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Why are so many people fascinated by superheroes? In this thoughtful, engaging, and intelligent collection, editor Robin Rosenberg compiles essays by some of the world's leading scholars to address our relationships with superheroes (and supervillains) as well as the humanity of superheroes. How do characters and stories reflect human nature? What is the role of justice in superhero worlds? Finally, are superhero stories good for us? These questions and many more are addressed in this illuminating new book.
Persia had Rustam. Babylon had Gilgamesh and Enkidu. Egypt had Horus and Isis. Greece had Odysseus and Achilles. Israel had its heroes, too--Moses, David, Esther and Samson. While Israel's heroes did not wear capes or spandex, they did meet cultural needs. In times of crisis, heroes emerge to model virtues that inspire a sense of commitment and worth. Identity concerns were especially acute for a post-exile Jewish culture. Using modern American superheroes and their stories in a cross-cultural discussion, this book presents the stories of Israelite characters as heroes filling a cultural need.
Contributions by Jerold J. Abrams, José Alaniz, John Carey, Maurice Charney, Peter Coogan, Joe Cruz, Phillip Lamarr Cunningham, Stefan Danter, Adam Davidson-Harden, Randy Duncan, Richard Hall, Richard Heldenfels, Alberto Hermida, Víctor Hernández-Santaolalla, A. G. Holdier, Tiffany Hong, Stephen Graham Jones, Siegfried Kracauer, Naja Later, Ryan Litsey, Tara Lomax, Tony Magistrale, Matthew McEniry, Cait Mongrain, Grant Morrison, Robert Moses Peaslee, David D. Perlmutter, W. D. Phillips, Jared Poon, Duncan Prettyman, Vladimir Propp, Noriko T. Reider, Robin S. Rosenberg, Hannah Ryan, Lennart Soberon, J. Richard Stevens, Lars Stoltzfus-Brown, John N. Thompson, Dan Vena, and Robert G. Weiner The Supervillain Reader, featuring both reprinted and original essays, reveals why we are so fascinated with the villain. The obsession with the villain is not a new phenomenon, and, in fact, one finds villains who are “super” going as far back as ancient religious and mythological texts. This innovative collection brings together essays, book excerpts, and original content from a wide variety of scholars and writers, weaving a rich tapestry of thought regarding villains in all their manifestations, including film, literature, television, games, and, of course, comics and sequential art. While The Supervillain Reader focuses on the latter, it moves beyond comics to show how the vital concept of the supervillain is part of our larger consciousness. Editors Robert Moses Peaslee and Robert G. Weiner collect pieces that explore how the villain is a complex part of narratives regardless of the original source. The Joker, Lex Luthor, Harley Quinn, Darth Vader, and Magneto must be compelling, stimulating, and proactive, whereas the superhero (or protagonist) is most often reactive. Indeed, whether in comics, films, novels, religious tomes, or video games, the eternal struggle between villain and hero keeps us coming back to these stories over and over again.
What is a superhero? Everyone knows, right? And yet everyone seems to have a different answer. In this innovative collection of essays, renowned psychologist Robin Rosenberg and comics scholar Peter Coogan explore this question from a variety of viewpoints. With essays from scholars and commentaries by the writers and creators themselves, What is a Superhero? is the first volume to provide a true synthesis and reflection of the state of superheroes in our society today.
Harness the Therapeutic Power of the Superhero! Application of the Star Wars Adoption Narrative Emotional Literacy and the Incredible Hulk Batman and Trauma What Would Superman Do--An Adlerian Approach? With an incisive historical foreword by John Shelton Lawrence and insight from contributors such as Michael Brody, Patty Scanlon, and Roger Kaufman, Lawrence Rubin takes us on a dynamic tour of the benefits of using these icons of popular culture and fantasy in counseling and play therapy. Not only can superheroes assist in clinical work with children, but Rubin demonstrates how they can facilitate growth and change with teen and adults. Early childhood memories of how we felt pretending to have the power to save the world or our families in the face of impending danger still resonate in our adult lives, making the use of superheroes attractive as well, to the creative counselor. In presenting case studies and wisdom gleaned from practicing therapists' experience, Lawrence Rubin shows how it is possible to uncover children's secret identities, assist treatment of adolescents with sexual behavior problems, and inspire the journey of individuation for gay and lesbian clients, all by paying attention to our intrinsic social need for superhero fantasy and play.
Why are so many of the superhero myths tied up with loss, often violent, of parents or parental figures? What is the significance of the dual identity? What makes some superhuman figures "good" and others "evil"? Why are so many of the prime superheroes white and male? How has the superhero evolved over the course of the 20th and early 21st centuries? And how might the myths be changing? Why is it that the key superhero archetypes - Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Spider-Man, the X-Men - touch primal needs and experiences in everyone? Why has the superhero moved beyond the pages of comics into other media? All these topics, and more, are covered in this lively and original exploration of the reasons why the superhero - in comic books, films, and TV - is such a potent myth for our times and culture.>
A thought-provoking collection of essays explores the philosophical side of the comic book world, collecting the contributions of sixteen philosophers on a variety of subjects, including evil, justice, metaphysics, and the limits of violence. Original.
Unmasking superhuman abilities and double lives, this analysis showcases nearly two dozen psychologists as their essays explore the minds of pop culture's most intriguing and daring superheroes, including Spider-Man, Batman, Superman, and the X-Men. Exposing the inner thoughts that these reclusive heroes would only dare share with trained professionals, heady experts give detailed psychoanalyses of what makes specific superheroes tick while answering such questions as Why do superheroes choose to be superheroes? Why is there so much prejudice against the X-Men mutants? What makes Spider-Man so altruistic? and Why are supervillains so aggressive? Additionally, the essays tackle why superheroes have such an enduring effect on American culture.
It's easy to name a superhero--Superman, Batman, Thor, Spiderman, the Green Lantern, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Rorschach, Wolverine--but it's not so easy to define what a superhero is. Buffy has superpowers, but she doesn't have a costume. Batman has a costume, but doesn't have superpowers. What is the role of power and superpower? And what are supervillains and why do we need them? In What is a Superhero?, psychologist Robin Rosenberg and comics scholar Peter Coogan explore this question from a variety of viewpoints, bringing together contributions from nineteen comic book experts--including both scholars in such fields as cultural studies, art, and psychology as well as leading comic book writers and editors. What emerges is a kaleidoscopic portrait of this most popular of pop-culture figures. Writer Jeph Loeb, for instance, sees the desire to make the world a better place as the driving force of the superhero. Jennifer K. Stuller argues that the female superhero inspires women to stand up, be strong, support others, and most important, to believe in themselves. More darkly, A. David Lewis sees the indestructible superhero as the ultimate embodiment of the American "denial of death," while writer Danny Fingeroth sees superheroes as embodying the best aspects of humankind, acting with a nobility of purpose that inspires us. Interestingly, Fingeroth also expands the definition of superhero so that it would include characters like John McClane of the Die Hard movies: "Once they dodge ridiculous quantities of machine gun bullets they're superheroes, cape or no cape." From summer blockbusters to best-selling graphic novels, the superhero is an integral part of our culture. What is a Superhero? not only illuminates this pop-culture figure, but also sheds much light on the fantasies and beliefs of the American people.
Dr. Rosenberg explores the importance of origin stories and what they tell us about the characters and real people. She reveals the origins stories of seven superheroes, how those stories have evolved over time, and what they can tell us about ourselves.
"If you dare to become your own Superhero, rest assured that life will never be the same!" In her twenty years as a nurse, Michelle Heath witnessed an incredible amount of pain and suffering. Overweight, with uncontrolled high blood pressure and unhappy, Heath believed she had nothing to do with the mess her life was in. It wasn't until she realized that she wasn't simply an innocent bystander in her own life that she began to take control. Written as part of Heath's own healing and as a means to help others on their own path to inner freedom and peace, 7 Principles to Become Your Own Superhero is a real-life book that explains how to find-and love-the Superhero inside of you. Heath's seven principles are aimed at women who understand that there are no quick fixes. Change will occur only by re-programming the way you think. "I enjoyed this book. I like your candor, clarity and talent." -Maya Angelou The powerful messages in 7 Principles to Become Your Own Superhero acknowledge how difficult it is for women to change behaviors and thought processes hammered into their heads for centuries. Even when it doesn't feel right, women continue to do things they know are wrong. Poetry by Lissette Norman
Stan Lee, who was the head writer of Marvel Comics in the early 1960s, co-created such popular heroes as Spider-Man, Hulk, the X-Men, the Fantastic Four, Iron Man, Thor, and Daredevil. This book traces the ways in which American theologians and comic books of the era were not only both saying things about what it means to be human, but, starting with Lee they were largely saying the same things. Author Anthony R. Mills argues that the shift away from individualistic ideas of human personhood and toward relational conceptions occurring within both American theology and American superhero comics and films does not occur simply on the ontological level, but is also inherent to epistemology and ethics, reflecting the comprehensive nature of human life in terms of being, knowing, and acting. This book explores the idea of the "American monomyth" that pervades American hero stories and examines its philosophical and theological origins and specific manifestations in early American superhero comics. Surveying the anthropologies of six American theologians who argue against many of the monomyth’s assumptions, principally the staunch individualism taken to be the model of humanity, and who offer relationality as a more realistic and ethical alternative, this book offers a detailed argument for the intimate historical relationship between the now disparate fields of comic book/superhero film creation, on the one hand, and Christian theology, on the other, in the United States. An understanding of the early connections between theology and American conceptions of heroism helps to further make sense of their contemporary parallels, wherein superhero stories and theology are not strictly separate phenomena but have shared origins and concerns.
This fun and accessible guide offers super advice for business success. Top venture capitalist and self- proclaimed ?comic book geek? Sean Wise reveals how to create a winning business persona through valuable strategies from great comic book icons. In this engaging and insightful guide, Wise takes readers on a guided tour through the world of superheroes and their lessons, directly relating them to essential business tactics people need to master in order to succeed in today?s workplace. Featuring modern-day examples of business icons who best illustrate superhero strategies?as well as cautionary lessons from infamous supervillains?this is the book for anyone who dreams of donning a cape instead of a suit, taking an oath instead of swearing at the copier, and seeing the big picture instead of getting mired in the daily grind.
Based on an ethnographic study in an urban classroom of 7- to 9-year olds, Writing Superheroes examines how young school children use popular culture, especially superhero stories, in the unofficial peer social world and in the official school literacy curriculum. In one sense, the book is about children "writing superheroes"-about children appropriating superhero stories in their fiction writing and dramatic play on the playground and in the classroom. These stories offer children identities as powerful people who do battle against evil and win. The stories, however, also reveal limiting ideological assumptions about relations between people-boys and girls, adults and children, people of varied heritages, physical demeanors, and social classes. The book, then, is also about children as "writing superheroes." With the assistance of their teacher, the observed children became superheroes of another sort, able to take on powerful cultural storylines. In this book, Anne Dyson examines how the children's interest in and conflicts about commercial culture give rise to both literacy and social learning, including learning how to participate in a community of differences.
And 1970s, and the dark and violent creatures who embody the pre- and post-millennial crises of faith. Lavishly illustrated, the articles come to startling conclusions about what we have really been reading under the covers with flashlights for generations. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com).
9/11 had a profound effect on America and the world. It left deep scars on the New York skyline and our collective psyche. And few things show how much we changed more accurately than the stories of our superheroes. In the past decade, superhero stories have regained national prominence. Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, and countless others are everywhere you look: in books, comics, movies, and even in musicals. But while they have the same names and uniforms as before, they are very different. They have been changed by the terrible events of September 11. They are darker, more uncertain, more fallible and flawed, and more realistic than ever before. But perhaps the most interesting thing is what those changes say about us. In The Superhero Response, author Jeffery Moulton explores how the terrorist attacks changed our superheroes and what those changes say about life in post-9/11 America. Filled with engaging analysis and thought-provoking questions, The Superhero Response is sure to fascinate die-hard fans and casual readers alike.
Pulitzer-prize nominee and English professor Garrett explores the deeper side of comic books--and the motion pictures they inspire--for the lessons they can teach readers about faith, justice, and redemption.
Looking for the ultimate self-improvement guide so that you can take matters into your own hands and jump start or rejuvenate your career? Look no further than The Self-Improvement Book: A Guide Book for Success and Personal Development. The Self-Improvement Book is actually a set of four already popular books by renowned business and entrepreneurship authors Can Akdeniz and Jonas Stark. The set includes: The Nine Routines of Successful People: A Guidebook for Personal Change, Problem Solver: An Amazing Way to Deal with Problems and Personal Challenges, Surpass the Average: Learn the Seven Traits of High Achievers, and Productivity Masterclass: Learning to Work Smarter and Faster.

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