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A supplemental textbook that examines the self-control theory of crime from a range of perspectives, both supportive and critical.
They go by many names: helicopter parents, hovercrafts, PFHs (Parents from Hell). The news media is filled with stories of well-intentioned parents going to ridiculous extremes to remove all obstacles from their child’s path to greatness . . . or at least to an ivy league school. From cradle to college, they remain intimately enmeshed in their children’s lives, stifling their development and creating infantilized, spoiled, immature adults unprepared to make the decisions necessary for the real world. Or so the story goes. Drawing on a wealth of eye-opening interviews with parents across the country, Margaret K. Nelson cuts through the stereotypes and hyperbole to examine the realities of what she terms “parenting out of control.” Situating this phenomenon within a broad sociological context, she finds several striking explanations for why today’s prosperous and well-educated parents are unable to set realistic boundaries when it comes to raising their children. Analyzing the goals and aspirations parents have for their children as well as the strategies they use to reach them, Nelson discovers fundamental differences among American parenting styles that expose class fault lines, both within the elite and between the elite and the middle and working classes. Nelson goes on to explore the new ways technology shapes modern parenting. From baby monitors to cell phones (often referred to as the world’s longest umbilical cord), to social networking sites, and even GPS devices, parents have more tools at their disposal than ever before to communicate with, supervise, and even spy on their children. These play important and often surprising roles in the phenomenon of parenting out of control. Yet the technologies parents choose, and those they refuse to use, often seem counterintuitive. Nelson shows that these choices make sense when viewed in the light of class expectations. Today’s parents are faced with unprecedented opportunities and dangers for their children, and are evolving novel strategies to adapt to these changes. Nelson’s lucid and insightful work provides an authoritative examination of what happens when these new strategies go too far.
* Shows how our attempt to gain control through technology and interconnected systems actually leaves us more open to threat * Uses a concrete systems-theory approach to explain globalization’s impact on contemporary society * Presents approaches and strategies to correct the threats of a globalized world Is globalization reducing our ability to guide our futures? Hedley contends that although humankind has historically gained increasing power over its fate, the trajectory of control is now on a downward course. While our globalized systems provide greater scale, access, speed, and efficiency than ever before, we are paradoxically becoming more vulnerable to unseen risks thanks to the massive information and communication infrastructure. This book tells us how to take back control.
Explores the fundamental confrontations between Spinoza and Levinas in ethics, politics, science, and religion.

After the end of superstitious religion, what is the meaning of the world? Baruch Spinoza’s answer is truth, Emmanuel Levinas’s is goodness: science versus ethics. In Out of Control, Richard A. Cohen brings this debate to life, providing a nuanced exposition of Spinoza and Levinas and the confrontations between them in ethics, politics, science, and religion.

Spinoza is the control, the inexorable defensive logic of administrative rationality, where freedom is equated to necessity—a seventeenth-century glimpse of Orwellian doublespeak and Big Brother. Levinas is the way out: transcendence not of God, being, and logic but of the other person experienced as moral obligation. To alleviate the suffering of others—nothing is more important! Spinoza wagers everything on mathematical truth, discarding the rest as ignorance and illusion; for Levinas, nothing surpasses the priorities of morality and justice, to create a world in which humans can be human and not numbers or consumers, drudges or robots.

Situating these two thinkers in today’s context, Out of Control responds to the fear of dehumanization in a world flattened by the alliance of positivism and plutocracy. It offers a nonideological ethical alternative, a way out and up, in the nobility of one human being helping another, and the solidarity that moves from morality to justice.

“Cohen’s work here is nothing short of spectacular. His analysis of the mathematical and scientific foundations of Spinoza’s philosophy is exemplary. Lucidly, meticulously, and with very disciplined analysis he conveys the force, power, and influence of Spinoza’s philosophy on contemporary religious thought.” — Richard I. Sugarman, University of Vermont

“Richard Cohen has managed to not merely bring these two notoriously difficult philosophers into conversation with each other, but to do so in an extremely readable way. Indeed, he is able to explain extremely difficult philosophical disputes with clarity and to convey a palpable sense of excitement.” — Robert Erlewine, author of Monotheism and Tolerance: Recovering a Religion of Reason
Counselling techniques that can help families regain control and causes of families breaking up are among the topics explored in this ethnographic account of therapeutic sessions. Two very different views of what a family is and how it becomes `out of control' emerge, resulting in vastly different therapeutic approaches. Gubrium compares two family counselling facilities - a community outpatient centre and a private family-focused psychiatric hospital - which have radically different concepts of the family. One setting examines a family's system including hidden structures, power relations, language and interaction as clues to the family's dysfunction. The other is concerned with affective relationships and deep emotions, h
"Happy birthday. Meet your new mother." Suffice it to say, Daisy's childhood had been less than idyllic. It hadn't been easy growing up the daughter of the great Frank Truman—a respected and prolific painter who was not what he'd appeared. Even fifteen years after his death, Daisy is still trying to deal with her mixed feelings, not helped one bit by the arrival of a persistent biographer. Nicholas Wynne wants to write the definitive account of the artist's life, not stir up old ghosts for Truman's daughter. He'd certainly never intended to fall in love. So what's he going to do with his newfound revelations about Daisy's secret and traumatic past?
In Behind Closed Doors and Standing in the Shadows, Shannon McKenna introduced the McCloud Brothers: intense, rugged, and super-sexy. Now, Davy McCloud is about to meet a woman he can't trust--or live without. . . Disillusioned P.I. Davy McCloud has an ironclad rule: never follow blind impulse when it comes to women. But he breaks it the instant gorgeous Margo Vetter shows up to teach at the gym next door. The sexual hunger--and the instinctual protectiveness--that she awakens is much too strong to resist. Broke and on the run, framed for a murder she didn't commit, Margot has no one to turn to but Davy McCloud. But the closer he comes, the more Margot discovers that holding back--or hiding--from this enigmatic, powerful man is impossible. In every way. . . Then passion flares with unexpected intensity. But Margot's past has finally caught up with her, and life is about to get more than complicated. It's turning deadly. . .

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