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Students of Latin have long enjoyed the poetry of Ovid, but his love poems, aptly titled Amores, have proved more difficult to introduce into the classroom. Curricular changes and increased appreciation of sophisticated love poetry are finally making room for the Amores. This edition of the first book of the Amores—the only one available for both intermediate- and advanced-level classes—addresses the needs of students of varying abilities and experience, helping them comprehend, and more fully enjoy, the rich complexities of Ovid's poetry. In their introduction to the volume, Maureen B. Ryan and Caroline A. Perkins recount Ovid's career as a poet, describe the elegiac genre, and explain elegiac meter and style. For the Latin text, they briefly introduce each poem, acquainting students with relevant subject matter and themes. Their commentary provides helpful notes clarifying grammatical constructions, word order, ellipsis, and other complexities of the Latin language that can challenge even the most experienced student. On the assumption that students will gain skills as they work through each poem, Ryan and Perkins give extensive and repeated assistance at the beginning of the text, tapering off as the student's facility increases. Throughout their commentary, they highlight thematic points of interest; explain mythological, cultural, and literary allusions; and stress the importance of Ovid's literary innovations. In addition to the critical apparatus accompanying each poem, this volume features a glossary of literary terms, a comprehensive Latin-to-English vocabulary, and an up-do-date bibliography.
From Catullus to Horace, the tradition of Latin erotic poetry produced works of literature which are still read throughout the world. Ovid’s Amores, written in the first century BC, is arguably the best-known and most popular collection in this tradition. Born in 43 BC, Ovid was educated in Rome in preparation for a career in public services before finding his calling as a poet. He may have begun writing his Amores as early as 25 BC. Although influenced by poets such as Catullus, Ovid demonstrates a much greater awareness of the funny side of love than any of his predecessors. The Amores is a collection of romantic poems centered on the poet’s own complicated love life: he is involved with a woman, Corinna, who is sometimes unobtainable, sometimes compliant, and often difficult and domineering. Whether as a literary trope, or perhaps merely as a human response to the problems of love in the real world, the principal focus of these poems is the poet himself, and his failures, foolishness, and delusions. By the time he was in his forties, Ovid was Rome’s most important living poet; his Metamorphoses, a kaleidoscopic epic poem about love and hatred among the gods and mortals, is one of the most admired and influential books of all time. In AD 8, Ovid was exiled by Augustus to Romania, for reasons that remain obscure. He died there in AD 17. The Amores were originally published in five books, but reissued around 1 AD in their current three-book form. This edition of the first book of the collection contains the complete Latin text of Book 1, along with commentary, notes and full vocabulary. Both entertaining and thought-provoking, this book will provide an invaluable aid to students of Latin and general readers alike. This book contain embedded audio files of the original text read aloud by Aleksandra Szypowska.
From Catullus to Horace, the tradition of Latin erotic poetry produced works of literature which are still read throughout the world. Ovid’s Amores, written in the first century BC, is arguably the best-known and most popular collection in this tradition. Born in 43 BC, Ovid was educated in Rome in preparation for a career in public services before finding his calling as a poet. He may have begun writing his Amores as early as 25 BC. Although influenced by poets such as Catullus, Ovid demonstrates a much greater awareness of the funny side of love than any of his predecessors. The Amores is a collection of romantic poems centered on the poet’s own complicated love life: he is involved with a woman, Corinna, who is sometimes unobtainable, sometimes compliant, and often difficult and domineering. Whether as a literary trope, or perhaps merely as a human response to the problems of love in the real world, the principal focus of these poems is the poet himself, and his failures, foolishness, and delusions. By the time he was in his forties, Ovid was Rome’s most important living poet; his Metamorphoses, a kaleidoscopic epic poem about love and hatred among the gods and mortals, is one of the most admired and influential books of all time. In AD 8, Ovid was exiled by Augustus to Romania, for reasons that remain obscure. He died there in AD 17. The Amores were originally published in five books, but reissued around 1 AD in their current three-book form. This edition of the first book of the collection contains the complete Latin text of Book 1, along with commentary, notes and full vocabulary. Both entertaining and thought-provoking, this book will provide an invaluable aid to students of Latin and general readers alike. This book contain embedded audio files of the original text read aloud by Aleksandra Szypowska.
Brings the Amores into the forefront of scholarly discussion
This dissertation explores the revised publication of the Amores as Ovid's triumphal monument to elegy, one which rivals Augustus' political activities and building projects and is a fitting self-tribute to Ovid's early literary career. Ovid's revised arrangement of the three books function as a vehicle of new meaning and aesthetics for the work as a whole. In each libellus, Ovid rearranges the poems in light of a major monument of Augustan Rome, challenging the reader to visually "see" both the elegiac and the Augustan monuments simultaneously and to construct meaning and political discourse from their comparison. The major monument is introduced in each book's second poem, which effectively revises the books' programmatic initial poems and presents the monument as the proper ambience for understanding the schematic and thematic arrangement of each book. Through this new comparative structure, Ovid voices dissent from the Augustan Principate and creates his own didactic message about the proper tension between the ruler's auctoritas and the citizens' libertas in a peaceful Rome. In Amores 1 Ovid maps his new arrangement onto the recently dedicated Forum Augustum to highlight Augustan intrusion in the lives of Romans and to lampoon the monument's triumphal claims. In Amores 2 the Portico of the Danaids at the Temple of Palatine Apollo evokes Augustus' propagandistic message of moral renewal at the end of the civil wars, a message that Ovid rejects and recasts by presenting an indictment of Augustus' marriage legislation as constituting a continuation of civil aggression in the private sphere. In Amores 3, the poet presents two distinct visions of the valley of the Circus Maximus to highlight the layered structure of Roman landscape and identity and introduce the major structuring theme of the final libellus, the raw natural environment and the fictive arts of the poets, and politicians, who shape that nature. Ovid's politics, however, are not thoroughly subversive. Rather, he offers the Princeps some realistic advice on the need for moderation. He does not object to Augustus' rule per se, but to Augustus' over-reaching and moralizing control that endangers the libertas of Rome's citizens and Rome's poets.
Contains a continuous running commentary suited to short poems. This book contains the commentary to promote in sixth-formers and undergraduates, not just an understanding of the Latin but also an appreciation of literary quality.
This volume provides the prescribed passages for the IB Latin Syllabus with examinations 2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022. Volume III contains the passages for the Vergil, History, and Love Poetry portions of the syllabus. Special Features: Unadapted Latin text; Introduction to each author and to each poem or selections; Laitn text with same- and facing-page notes; Appendices on meter and on literary terms; Historical and literary timelines; Latin-to-English glossary.
Provides an overview of the life of Roman poet Ovid and offers an in depth analysis of his varied works.
Tibullus is considered one of the finest exponents of Latin lyric in the golden age of Rome, during the Emperor Augustus’s reign, and his poetry retains its enduring beauty and appeal. Together these works provide an important document for anyone who seeks to understand Roman culture and sexuality and the origins of Western poetry. * The new translation by Rodney Dennis and Michael Putnam conveys to students the elegance and wit of the original poems. * Ideal for courses on classical literature, classical civilization, Roman history, comparative literature, and the classical tradition and reception. * The Latin verses will be printed side-by-side with the English text. * Explanatory notes and a glossary elucidate context and describe key names, places, and events. * An introduction by Julia Haig Gaisser provides the necessary historical and social background to the poet’s life and works. * Includes the poems of Sulpicia and Lygdamus, transmitted with the text of Tibullus and formerly ascribed to him.

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