Download Free Oxford Sketchbook Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Oxford Sketchbook and write the review.

It's high summer in Oxford. The university vacation has just begun. The eight governors of the Moneybuckle Endowment architectural library are assembling at All Saints College for the annual dinner before their meeting under chairman Mark Treasure, merchant banker. The talk at the table is of some pricey sketches said to be by Constable, and an offer from a dealer in the town. But the talk turns to shock when murder is done in Walton Street, with the sketches as the obvious motive. The police are quick to make an arrest, but Treasure is sure they've got the wrong suspect - even though all other likely culprits are Moneybuckle governors, or Moneybuckle's custodian himself... Treasure in Oxford marks the twelfth outing for David Williams' utterly charming banker-turned-detective in a cleverly plotted mystery that is sure to delight.
New York City Notebook features over 50 drawings and watercolours by artist Fabrice Moireau, who turns his keen eye and delicate brush to recording the enchanting architecture of this fascinating city. The perfect gift for stationery lovers and art enthusiasts alike.
London Notebook features drawings and watercolours by artist Graham Byfield, who turns his keen eye and delicate brush to recording the enchanting architecture and landscapes of this iconic city. The perfect gift for stationery lovers and art enthusiasts alike.
In the opening decades of the twentieth century, Germany was at the cutting edge of arts and humanities scholarship across Europe. However, when many of its key thinkers - leaders in their fields in classics, philosophy, archaeology, art history, and oriental studies - were forced to flee to England following the rise of the Nazi regime, Germany's loss became Oxford's gain. From the mid-1930s onwards, Oxford could accurately be described as an 'ark of knowledge' of western civilization: a place where ideas about art, culture, and history could be rescued, developed, and disseminated freely. The city's history as a place of refuge for scientists who were victims of Nazi oppression is by now familiar, but the story of its role as a sanctuary for cultural heritage, though no less important, has received much less attention. In this volume, the impact of Oxford as a shelter, a meeting point, and a centre of thought in the arts and humanities specifically is addressed, by looking both at those who sought refuge there and stayed, and those whose lives intersected with Oxford at crucial moments before and during the war. Although not every great refugee can be discussed in detail in this volume, this study offers an introduction to the unique conjunction of place, people, and time that shaped Western intellectual history, exploring how the meeting of minds enabled by libraries, publishing houses, and the University allowed Oxford's refugee scholars to have a profound and lasting impact on the development of British culture. Drawing on oral histories, previously unpublished letters, and archives, it illuminates and interweaves both personal and global histories to demonstrate how, for a short period during the war, Oxford brought together some of the greatest minds of the age to become the custodians of a great European civilization.
In her fascinating and beautifully illustrated book, Catherine Phillips uses letters, new archival material, and contemporary publications to reconstruct the visual world Gerard Manley Hopkins knew between 1862 and 1889 - with its illustrated journals, art exhibitions, Gothic architecture, photographic shows, and changing art criticism - and to show how it was connected to the startling originality of his writing.
Explains the creative process that underlies these drawings and the interpretive techniques which have been used to analyse them. Colour illus.

Best Books