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Presenting the non-directive and related points of view in counselling and therapy, this book defines the progress recently made in the development of the techniques and basic philosophy of counselling.
Since its beginnings in the 1950s, the person-centred approach to therapy has developed in many ways. In this important new text, Campbell Purton introduces the 'focusing' approach of Eugene Gendlin. The book discussed Gendlin's theoretical innovations and their implications for clinical practice. It throws light on the relationship between the various schools of therapy, and on the relationship between therapy and such areas as ethics and spirituality. It will be essential reading for students and practioners of person-centred therapy.
Building on the success of the first edition, this substantially revised and extended new edition is set to remain the most in-depth and wide-ranging book available on person-centred psychotherapy and counselling. The book is thoroughly updated to reflect the latest trends in theory and practice: • It extends its coverage of professional settings and applications, including brand new chapters on children, older people, arts-based therapies, addiction and bereavement. • It engages systematically with urgent contemporary issues, such as evidence-based practice, political and medical discourses, and theoretical integration. • It uses case illustrations, therapist-client dialogues, points of reflection and further resources to bring person-centred therapy to life for the reader, in a user-friendly way. • It includes contributions by an increasingly extensive group of writers, thinkers, teachers and practitioners.
Contributions to Client-Centered Therapy and the Person-Centered Approach brings together an important set of difficult-to-obtain original papers and writings by Nat Raskin for academics, teachers, researchers and all serious students.
Person-Centred Counselling in a Nutshell is a short, accessible guide to one of the most popular approaches to counselling. Using examples drawn from practice, Roger Casemore outlines, in a clear, jargon-free style, the main principles of the person-centred approach, using the core therapeutic conditions: - congruence - unconditional regard - empathy This revised and updated second edition includes new material on professional issues, on the use of person-centred counselling in short-term therapy, and on the wider application of the person-centred approach in other settings. Providing a concise introduction to the theory and practice of person-centred counselling, Person-Centred Counselling in a Nutshell is the ideal place to start for anyone reading about the approach for the first time. Roger Casemore is Senior Teaching Fellow and Director of Counselling courses at University of Warwick
From the Foreword `It is an honour to be asked to write a foreword for this new book by Michael McMillan. I have been excited about this book ever since I read early drafts of its first two chapters some time ago at the birth of the project. At different times thereafter I have read other parts and my consistent impression has been that this is an author who has both a sophisticated academic understanding of the material and a great skill in communicating that widely. Those two qualities do not often go together! The book is about change. After a first chapter in which the author introduces us to the person-centred concept of the person, chapter two is devoted to the change process within the client, including a very accessible description of Rogers' process model. Chapter three goes on to explore why and how change occurs in the human being, while chapter four introduces the most up-to-date person-centred theory in relation to the nature of the self concept and its changing process. Chapters five and six explore why change occurs in therapy and the conditions that facilitate that change, while chapter seven looks beyond the core conditions to focus on the particular quality of presence, begging the question as to whether this is a transpersonal/transcendental quality or an intense experiencing of the core conditions themselves. This is an intensely modern book particularly in its postmodern emphasis. Rogers is sometimes characterised as coming from modernist times but he can also be seen as one of the early post modernists in his emphasis on process more than outcome and relationship more than personal striving. The modern nature of the book is also emphasised by a superb analysis of the relationship between focussing and person-centred therapy in Chapter five, linking also with Polanyi's notion of indwelling in this and other chapters. In suggesting that in both focussing and person-centred therapy the therapist is inviting the client to 'indwell' himself or herself, the author provides a framework for considering many modern perceptions of the approach including notions such as 'presence' and ' relational depth'. Also, the link with focussing is modern in the sense that the present World Association for the approach covers a fairly broad family including traditional person-centred therapists, experiential therapists, focussing-oriented therapists and process-guiding therapists. Important in this development is the kind of dialogue encouraged by the present book' - Dave Mearns, Strathclyde University The belief that change occurs during the therapeutic process is central to all counselling and psychotherapy. The Person-Centred Approach to Therapeutic Change examines how change can be facilitated by the counsellor offering empathy, unconditional positive regard and congruence. The Person-Centred Approach to Therapeutic Change outlines the main theoretical cornerstones of the person-centred approach and then, applying these, describes why change occurs as a result of a person-centred therapeutic encounter. The author explores the counselling relationship as an environment in which clients can open themselves up to experiences they have previously found difficult to acknowledge and to move forward. Integral to the person-centred approach is Carl Rogers' radical view that change should be seen as an ongoing process rather than an alteration from one fixed state to another. In Rogers' view psychological health is best achieved by the person who is able to remain in a state of continual change. Such a person is open to all experiences and is therefore able to assimilate and adapt to new experiences, whether 'good' or 'bad'. By focusing explicitly on how change is theorized and facilitated in counselling, this book goes to the heart of person-centred theory and practice, making it essential reading for trainees and practitioners alike.
The person-centred approach is one of the most popular, enduring and respected approaches to psychotherapy and counselling. Person-Centred Therapy returns to its original formulations to define it as radically different from other self-oriented therapies. Keith Tudor and Mike Worrall draw on a wealth of experience as practitioners, a deep knowledge of the approach and its history, and a broad and inclusive awareness of other approaches. This significant contribution to the advancement of person-centred therapy: Examines the roots of person-centred thinking in existential, phenomenological and organismic philosophy. Locates the approach in the context of other approaches to psychotherapy and counselling. Shows how recent research in areas such as neuroscience support the philosophical premises of person-centred therapy. Challenges person-centred therapists to examine their practice in the light of the history and philosophical principles of the approach. Person-Centred Therapy offers new and exciting perspectives on the process and practice of therapy, and will encourage person-centred practitioners to think about their work in deeper and more sophisticated ways.

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