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Circulation, audience, and the creation of a shared court culture Making books at the Ottoman court Sokollu Mehmed Pasha and the illustrated Ottoman histories Chief Black Eunuch Mehmed Agha: negotiating the sultanic image In the image of a military ruler A Venetian Ottomanized: Chief White Eunuch Gazanfer Agha and his artistic patronage.
Ottoman historical writing of the 15th and 16th centuries played a significant role in fashioning Ottoman identity and institutionalizing the dynastic state structure during this period of rapid imperial expansion. This volume shows how the writing of history achieved these effects by examining the implicit messages conveyed by the texts and illustrations of key manuscripts. It answers such questions as how the Ottomans understood themselves within their court and in relation to non-Ottoman others; how they visualized the ideal ruler; how they defined their culture and place in the world; and what the significance of Islam was in their self-definition.
The first study of album-making in the Ottoman empire during the seventeenth century, demonstrating the period’s experimentation, eclecticism, and global outlook The Album of the World Emperor examines an extraordinary piece of art: an album of paintings, drawings, calligraphy, and European prints compiled for the Ottoman sultan Ahmed I (r. 1603–17) by his courtier Kalender Paşa (d. 1616). In this detailed study of one of the most important works of seventeenth-century Ottoman art, Emine Fetvacı uses the album to explore questions of style, iconography, foreign inspiration, and the very meaning of the visual arts in the Islamic world. The album’s thirty-two folios feature artworks that range from intricate paper cutouts to the earliest examples of Islamic genre painting, and contents as eclectic as Persian and Persian-influenced calligraphy, studies of men and women of different ethnicities and backgrounds, depictions of popular entertainment and urban life, and European prints depicting Christ on the cross that in turn served as models for apocalyptic Ottoman paintings. Through the album, Fetvacı sheds light on imperial ideals as well as relationships between court life and popular culture, and shows that the boundaries between Ottoman art and the art of Iran and Western Europe were much more porous than has been assumed. Rather than perpetuating the established Ottoman idiom of the sixteenth century, the album shows that this was a time of openness to new models, outside sources, and fresh forms of expression. Beautifully illustrated and featuring all the folios of the original seventy-page album, The Album of the World Emperor revives a neglected yet significant artwork to demonstrate the distinctive aesthetic innovations of the Ottoman court.
The father of the legendary Ottoman sultan Suleyman the Magnificent, Selim I ("The Grim") set the stage for centuries of Ottoman supremacy by doubling the size of the empire. Conquering Eastern Anatolia, Syria, and Egypt, Selim promoted a politicized Sunni Ottoman* identity against the Shiite Safavids of Iran, thus shaping the early modern Middle East. Analyzing a wide array of sources in Ottoman-Turkish, Persian, and Arabic, H. Erdem Cipa offers a fascinating revisionist reading of Selim's rise to power and the subsequent reworking and mythologizing of his persona in 16th- and 17th-century Ottoman historiography. In death, Selim continued to serve the empire, becoming represented in ways that reinforced an idealized image of Muslim sovereignty in the early modern Eurasian world.
Bernhard von Breydenbach’s Peregrinatio in terram sanctam (Journey to the Holy Land), first published in 1486, is one of the seminal books of early printing and is especially renowned for the originality of its woodcuts. In Picturing Experience in the Early Printed Book, Elizabeth Ross considers the Peregrinatio from a variety of perspectives to explain its value for the cultural history of the period. Breydenbach, a high-ranking cleric in Mainz, recruited the painter Erhard Reuwich of Utrecht for a religious and artistic adventure in a political hot spot—a pilgrimage to research the peoples, places, plants, and animals of the Levant. The book they published after their return ambitiously engaged with the potential of the new print medium to give an account of their experience. The Peregrinatio also aspired to rouse readers to a new crusade against Islam by depicting a contest in the Mediterranean between the Christian bastion of the city of Venice and the region’s Muslim empires. This crusading rhetoric fit neatly with the state of the printing industry in Mainz, which largely subsisted as a tool for bishops’ consolidation of authority, including selling the pope’s plans to combat the Ottoman Empire. Taking an artist on such an enterprise was unprecedented. Reuwich set a new benchmark for technical achievement with his woodcuts, notably a panorama of Venice that folds out to 1.62 meters in length and a foldout map that stretches from Damascus to Sudan around the first topographically accurate view of Jerusalem. The conception and execution of the Peregrinatio show how and why early printed books constructed new means of visual representation from existing ones—and how the form of a printed book emerged out of the interaction of eyewitness experience and medieval scholarship, real travel and spiritual pilgrimage, curiosity and fixed belief, texts and images.
In this re-assessment of Renaissance art, Lisa Jardine and Jerry Brotton examine the ways in which European civilization defined itself between 1450 and 1550.
[This book] helps students understand how ancient peoples and cultures made the history that still affects the world today.-http://www. glencoe. com.
Oxford University Press is proud to present the most up-to-date and comprehensive encyclopedia in this field. In three illustrated volumes with more than 1,500 entries, the Encyclopedia deals with all aspects of this important area of study, ranging from the Middle East to Central Asia to Southeast Asia and Africa as well as Europe and North America. The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture covers all subject areas including: artists, ruler, writers, architecture, ceramics, sculpture, painting, calligraphy, coins, textiles, and much more.
In this generously illustrated book, Jerry Brotton documents the dramatic changes in the nature of geographical representation which took place during the sixteenth century, and suggests that they tell us a great deal about the transformation of European culture at the end of the early modern era. He examines the age's fascination with maps, charts, and globes as both texts and artifacts that provided their owners with a promise of gain, be it intellectual, political, or financial.
Papers presented at a conference held Sept. 22-26, 1997 in the Herzog August Bibliothek, Wolfenb'uttel, Ger. which was sponsored by the Wolfenb'utteler Arbeitskreis f'ur Renaissanceforschung and Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
The Ottoman Empire was one the crucial forces that shaped the modern world. These essays combine archaeological and historical approaches to shed light on how the Ottoman Empire approached the challenge of governing frontiers as diverse as Central and Eastern Europe, Anatolia, Iraq, Arabia, and the Sudan over the 15th to 20th centuries.
"With its unprecedented focus on the history of Orientalism in British art, this fascinating book examines the work of British artists who engaged with Middle Eastern themes over three centuries, from the 1620s to the eclipse of the Ottoman Empire in 1922." "Paintings by British artists who travelled to the Islamic world during this period portray a wide range of subject matter, from landscapes and interiors to portraits, documentary, and genre scenes. The Lure of the East includes essays that discuss the beauty of these images, as well as investigate the ways in which ideas about this beauty formed part of the larger history of Western political and colonial involvement with the region." "Placing the British within the genre of Orientalism, this catalogue features both well-known and rarely seen paintings, as well as sketches and photographs by leading British artists from the eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries, including works by Roger Fenton, William Holman Hunt, John Frederick Lewis, Joshua Reynolds, John Singer Sargent, and Stanley Spencer. The Lure of the East considers the shared legacy of British and Islamic artistic traditions, as well as Western myths about the Islamic world in relation to artists' direct experiences."--BOOK JACKET.

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