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From Satisfactory to Outstanding: a hands-on guide to unashamedly pimping lessons for observation.
This is an informative, engaging and accessible book about teaching that covers a broad range of content without being superficial.
THE MUST-HAVE BEHAVIOUR MANAGEMENT BIBLE "Show the students the can of dog food, open it up and then eat from it. Offer it round the class to see if anyone else will have a taste..."* This is just one of Sue Cowley's infamous ways of captivating your students, seizing control and getting those buggers to behave! *(WARNING: Make sure you read the crucial preparation advice before putting this idea into practice!) Now in its fifth edition, Getting the Buggers to Behave remains a firm favourite with trainees, newly qualified teachers and experienced staff alike. The advice ranges from the basics of behaviour management to 'how to deal with the class from hell' and is applicable whether you are working in the early years, primary, secondary or further education with level specific examples in every chapter. The book covers preparing for your first meeting with a new group of students, developing your individual teaching style, creating a positive learning environment and working in really challenging schools. Sue is famed for the practical, honest and realistic nature of her advice, and all her ideas include case studies and anecdotes based on her years of experience working as a teacher and the stories and problems she has advised on 'agony aunt' style, for teachers of all levels. In this brand new edition, Sue takes a detailed look at the use of incentives for managing behaviour, how to implement a restorative justice approach in order to change children's behaviour and also identifies the ten most common forms of misbehaviour and how to deal with them. So, if your 2 year olds are ignoring you, your Year 11s are unmanageable, your tutor group is running riot or that unmentionable 9 year old is driving you round the bend then this is the book for you!
In Progress, Isabella Wallace and Leah Kirkman explore our understanding of this core educational concept, drawing together ideas from leading international thinkers and practical strategies for busy teachers. The Best of the Best series brings together – for the first time – the most influential voices in education in a format that is concise, insightful and accessible for teachers. Keeping up with the latest and best ideas in education can be a challenge – as can putting them into practice – but this new series is here to help. Each title features a comprehensive collection of brief and accessible contributions from some of the most eminent names in education from around the world. In this exciting first volume, Isabella Wallace and Leah Kirkman have curated a collection of inspiring contributions on the theme of progress and have developed practical, realistic, cross-curricular and cross-phase strategies to make the most of these important insights in the classroom. Each expert has provided a list of further reading so you can dig deeper as you see fit. In addition, the Teacher Development Trust has outlined ideas for embedding these insights as part of CPD. Suitable for all educationalists, including teachers and school leaders. Many myths abound about progress. We have to show that learners are making progress, but what do we really mean by the term? Who decides what constitutes progress? Who should set targets, and why? How do we measure progress? How do we know when pupils are demonstrating it? How do we differentiate and allow for learners’ different starting points? Should we be measuring everyone against the average or should we be looking at ipsative progress, where achievement is relative only to the pupil’s personal best? Indeed, if everyone is making expected progress, is that really progress or just doing as expected? Do we need to rethink assessment? Does meta-cognition hold the answer? What about other approaches like SOLO taxonomy or Building Learning Power? If progress isn’t linear, what kind of shape does it have? What implicit value judgements may we be making when applying the term uncritically and unthinkingly? How do we ensure that funding, including the Pupil Premium, is having a tangible effect on progress? Can we make learning and progress visible? What does the evidence base – the research studies and meta-analyses – have to say? Will that be applicable in all contexts? These are just some of the questions that the educational experts delve into in this first volume in the Best of the Best series. The practical strategies offered by Isabella Wallace and Leah Kirkman demonstrate how teachers can immediately use these ideas in the classroom. Advice from the Teacher Development Trust demonstrates how to plan sustained and responsive changes to practice based on the book’s key insights. Contributions include: Professor John Hattie – Pupil premium – monitoring what works. Geoff Petty – Improving progress by learning from the best research. Sir John Jones – Demographics, destiny and the magic-weaving business. Sugata Mitra – Schools in the Internet age. David Didau – The real shape of progress. Professor Mick Waters – Doing well for your age? Will Ord – What is progress? Claire Gadsby – A climate for learning. Professor Robert Bjork – Creating desirable difficulties to enhance learning. Professor John West-Burnham – Progress and practice. Professor Guy Claxton – Building Learning Power: finding your own sweet spot. James Nottingham – Progress, progress, progress. Mark Burns – Learning without limits. Martin Robinson – The pupil’s progress. Mike Gershon – Exemplar work. Pam Hook – On making progress visible with SOLO. Andy Hargreaves – Uplifting colleagues. Teacher Development Trust – Next steps ...
Education is of relevance to everyone but it involves a specialised vocabulary and terminology which may be opaque or unfamiliar to those new to the field. The new UK-based Dictionary of Education provides concise and accessible definitions of the terms that anyone studying education, or working in the fieled, is likely to encounter. Coverage includes all sectors of education: pre-school, primary, secondary, and further and higher education, adult and continuing education and work-based learning as well as major legislation, key figures and organizations, and curriculum and assessment terminology. The Dictionary will include entry level web links updated via a companion web site. It includes a fully cross-referenced appendix of comparative terms used in the US, Canada, Australia and other English-language speaking countries.
Teacher-talk is a powerful tool. But whilst we must embrace teacher-talk as vital, we must also bear in mind that not all teacher-talk is created equally... Long periods of talk will not always keep a class spellbound. We need other techniques on which we can draw to help pupils embed learning and make progress. After all, how can we be effectively checking progress and understanding when it is we who are doing all the talking? How can we be certain that the sea of 'attentive' faces before us is not simply contemplating lunch? The solution is here: a vast bank of exciting, engaging, practical ways to allow learners to access and understand complex topics and skills without relentlessly bending their ears. Strategies which not only prevent pupils from being passengers in lessons, but which also make progress visible to both teacher and learner. In an entertaining and practical way, Talk-Less Teaching shows you how to encourage learners' responsibility for their own progress without compromising test results or overall achievement. Discover hundreds of tried and tested practical tips for helping pupils understand difficult concepts and learn new skills without developing lecture-laryngitis.
In Feedback, Isabella Wallace and Leah Kirkman explore our understanding of what is often cited as one of the most powerful tools for enhancing learning, drawing together ideas from leading international thinkers and practical strategies for busy teachers. The Best of the Best series brings together – for the first time – the most influential voices in education in a format that is concise, insightful and accessible for teachers. Keeping up with the latest and best ideas in education can be a challenge – as can putting them into practice – but this new series is here to help. Each title features a comprehensive collection of brief and accessible contributions from some of the most eminent names in education from around the world. In this second volume in the series, Wallace and Kirkman have curated a collection of inspiring contributions on the theme of feedback and have developed practical, realistic, cross-curricular and cross-phase strategies to make the most of these important insights in the classroom. Feedback can be understood and implemented in the classroom in a whole range of ways, as Wallace and Kirkman’s practical strategies – based on the contributors’ expert insights – demonstrate. From these contributions, each unique and enlightening in its own right, a number of key themes emerge. One is the need to get the balance right between praise and constructive critique by keeping feedback specific, detailed and firmly referenced to clearly explained criteria. Another is that these same principles should be applied whether the feedback is from teacher to student, teacher to colleague, student to teacher or student to student. Response to feedback is critical: the need to give students the time to reflect on it, to question it, to act on it. Also important is the manner in which feedback is given: kindly, constructively, in a timely way and in an atmosphere of trust. Above all, whether written or oral, effective feedback is primarily about is clear, constructive and specific communication. Each expert has provided a list of further reading so you can dig deeper into the topic. In addition, the Teacher Development Trust has offered more useful ideas for embedding these insights as part of CPD. Suitable for all educationalists, including teachers and school leaders. Contributions include: Professor Dylan Wiliam – Formative assessment: the bridge between teaching and learning; Arthur L. Costa and Robert J. Garmston – A feedback perspective; Professor Bill Lucas – Feedback or feedforward?; Diana Laufenberg – Finding time for feedback; Paul Dix – Wristband peer feedback; Taylor Mali – The sound of silent tears of pride; Ron Berger – Critique and feedback; Andy Griffith – Receiving feedback; Professor Barry Hymer – Praise and rewards: danger – handle with care; Jackie Beere OBE – How can failure help you grow?; Mike Gershon – Target implementation time; Professor Mick Waters – Reward points for teachers; Geoff Petty – The quality learning cycle: feedback for significant progress; Shirley Clarke – Getting underneath the understanding and acting on it; Seth Godin – The four rules of peer feedback; Phil Beadle – Shut up, coach!; Teacher Development Trust – Next steps ...

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