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Incorporated in 1795, Plymouth is known for its industrialists and innovations. A. Terry & Company was a pioneer in the industry of malleable iron, and Eli Terry was instrumental in the creation of interchangeable parts leading to mass production. Cooper Oven Thermometer designed and created the first baking thermometers in the United States. Plymouth is also home to two sections of historic importance listed on the National Register of Historic Places: Plymouth Center, known as the initial center of town with locations on the Underground Railroad, and East Church, where a small group of Tories lived during the Revolutionary War.
A genealogy of the ancestors of Nathan Lewis Harrison born in 1983 in Lansing, Michigan. His parents were Keith Graham Harrison and Linda Diane Dodson. Ancestors, descendants and relatives lived mainly in England, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Michigan.
Montgomery County was incorporated in 1784, though much of the area was settled in the late 1600s and early 1700s through land grants by Pennsylvania's founder, William Penn. Located immediately northwest of Philadelphia, the Quaker city has always influenced the county. Wealthy mansions, religious institutions, colleges, and industry all have contributed to the fabric of the county. Eastern Montgomery County Revisited explores this scenic and historic area with rare postcards from 1905 to 1970 and is meant to be a companion to Eastern Montgomery County. Although this book visits many favorite and familiar parts of the county, great emphasis has been placed on smaller, lesser-known places that truly make this book intriguing and unique.
Congregationalists, the oldest group of American Protestants, are the heirs of New England's first founders. While they were key characters in the story of early American history, from Plymouth Rock and the founding of Harvard and Yale to the Revolutionary War, their luster and numbers have faded. But Margaret Bendroth's critical history of Congregationalism over the past two centuries reveals how the denomination is essential for understanding mainline Protestantism in the making. Bendroth chronicles how the New England Puritans, known for their moral and doctrinal rigor, came to be the antecedents of the United Church of Christ, one of the most liberal of all Protestant denominations today. The demands of competition in the American religious marketplace spurred Congregationalists, Bendroth argues, to face their distinctive history. By engaging deeply with their denomination's storied past, they recast their modern identity. The soul-searching took diverse forms--from letter writing and eloquent sermonizing to Pilgrim-celebrating Thanksgiving pageants--as Congregationalists renegotiated old obligations to their seventeenth-century spiritual ancestors. The result was a modern piety that stood a respectful but ironic distance from the past and made a crucial contribution to the American ethos of religious tolerance.

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