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Since the 2004 enlargement of the European Union over half a million Polish migrants have registered to work in the United Kingdom, constituting one of the largest migration movements in contemporary Europe. Drawing on research undertaken across a wide range of disciplines - history, economics, sociology, anthropology, film studies and discourse analysis - and focusing on both the Polish and British aspects of this phenomenon - both emigration and immigration - this edited collection investigates what is actually new about this migration flow, what its causes and consequences are, and how these migrants' lives have changed by moving to the United Kingdom. As the first book to deal with Polish migration to the United Kingdom, Polish Migration to the UK in the 'New' European Union will appeal to scholars across a range of social sciences, whose work concerns migration and the migration process.
Two decades have now passed since the revolutions of 1989 swept through Eastern Europe and precipitated the collapse of state socialism across the region, engendering a period of massive social, economic and political transformation. This book explores the ways in which young people growing up in post-socialist Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union negotiate a range of identities and transitions in their personal lives against a backdrop of thoroughgoing transformation in their societies. Drawing upon original empirical research in a range of countries, the book's contributors explore the various freedoms and insecurities that have accompanied neo-liberal transformation in post-socialist countries - in spheres as diverse as consumption, migration, political participation, volunteering, employment and family formation - and examine the ways in which they have begun to re-shape different aspects of young people's lives. In addition, while 'social change' is a central theme of the issue, all of the chapters in the collection indicate that the new opportunities and risks faced by young people continue both to underpin and to be shaped by familiar social and spatial divisions, not only within and between the countries addressed, but also between 'East' and 'West'. This book was originally published as a special issue of Journal of Youth Studies.
There is a highly significant and under-considered intersection and interaction between migration law and labour law. Labour lawyers have tended to regard migration law as generally speaking outside their purview, and migration lawyers have somewhat similarly tended to neglect labour law. The culmination of a collaborative project on 'Migrants at Work' funded by the John Fell Fund, the Society of Legal Scholars, and the Research Centre at St John's College, Oxford, this volume brings together distinguished legal and migration scholars to examine the impact of migration law on labour rights and how the regulation of migration increasingly impacts upon employment and labour relations. Examining and clarifying the interactions between migration, migration law, and labour law, contributors to the volume identify the many ways that migration law, as currently designed, divides the objectives of labour law, privileging concerns about the labour supply and demand over worker-protective concerns. In addition, migration law creates particular forms of status, which affect employment relations, thereby dividing the subjects of labour law. Chapters cover the labour laws of the UK, Australia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Germany, Sweden, and the US. References are also made to discrete practices in Brazil, France, Greece, New Zealand, Mexico, Poland, and South Africa. These countries all host migrants and have developed systems of migration law reflecting very different trajectories. Some are traditional countries of immigration and settlement migration, while others have traditionally been countries of emigration but now import many workers. There are, nonetheless, common features in their immigration law which have a profound impact on labour law, for instance in their shared contemporary shift to using temporary labour migration programmes. Further chapters examine EU and international law on migration, labour rights, human rights, and human trafficking and smuggling, developing cross-jurisdictional and multi-level perspectives. Written by leading scholars of labour law, migration law, and migration studies, this book provides a diverse and multidisciplinary approach to this field of legal interaction, of interest to academics, policymakers, legal practitioners, trade unions, and migrants' groups alike.
This book analyzes the aims, activities and structures of cross border migrant organizations in four European countries of arrival and seven countries of origin, exploring different patterns of cross-border resource mobilization and coordination.
In recent years an increasing number of scholars have incorporated a focus on emotions in their theories of material culture, transnationalism and globalization, and this book aims to contribute to this field of inquiry. It examines how 'emotions' can be theorized, and serves as a useful analytical tool for understanding the interrelated mobility of humans, objects and images. Ethnographically rich, and theoretically grounded case studies offer new perspectives on the relations between migration, material culture and emotions. While some chapters address the many different ways in which migrants and migrant artists express their emotions through objects and images in transnational contexts, other chapters focus on how particular works of art, everyday objects and artefacts can evoke feelings specific to particular migrant groups and communities. Case studies also analyse how artists, academics and policy makers can stimulate positive interaction between migrants and non-migrant communities.
In the space of around ten years Ireland went from being a traditional labour exporter to a leading European economy, and thus an attractive destination for immigrants from Eastern Europe and further afield. This produced a singular social laboratory, which this book explores in all its complexity set against the backdrop of globalization. Until recently seen as a showcase for the success of globalization, Ireland also became a destination for those displaced by the effects of globalization elsewhere. Globalization, Migration and Social Transformation takes Ireland as a paradigmatic case of social transformation, exploring the reasons why emigration was so rapidly replaced by immigration, along with the social, political, cultural and economic effects of this shift. Presenting the latest research around the themes of identity, social transformations and EU and Irish politics and policy, this book offers a rich array of detailed empirical case studies drawn from Ireland, which shed light on the experiences of immigrant groups from around the world and the wider processes of social transformation. In addition, it examines the manner in which the Irish state and the broader political system relate to new migrants and vice-versa, thus advancing our comparative understanding of how the European Union is responding to the challenge of mass migration. Globalization, Migration and Social Transformation makes a strong contribution to the comparative literature on immigration and integration, diaspora and social transformation in the era of globalization, and as such, it will appeal to social scientists with interests in migration, race and ethnicity, globalization and Irish studies.
Cultural Difference and Social Solidarity: Critical Cases engages the paradox of cultural difference and social solidarity within contemporary contexts. Several of the essays in this book focus on individuals negotiating with perceptions of their personal, social, and political identity. Other contributions frame the political perceptions of the individuals and the cultural communities those perceptions construct. In this collection are essays concerning immigrants and the negotiation of sacred, political, and cultural spaces in the United Arab Emirates, the UK, Germany, and Australia as well as analyses of internal cultural differences and solidarity in Québec, Canada and Turkey. Selections include an analysis of language accommodation asymmetry in the Gulf States; ethnopluralism and right wing extremism in Germany; the search of renewed Alevi identity in Australia; and the difference between post-war and post-EU ascension Polish immigrants in the UK. In addition, two essays concern challenges and analysis of Canadian and Québécois multi-culturalism. Finally, three contributions focus on Turkey through an analysis of perceptions of the dead in Turkey’s Kurdish conflict; transformation of urban identities in the Turkish city of Mersin; and how plurality is incorporated into symbolic representations of religious difference in Antakya, Turkey. Each essay in this book describes processes of differences and solidarities within specific contexts, challenging implicitly or explicitly the paradoxical entanglement of the two. Through this collection, the editors intend to begin to demonstrate the possibility of a broader acceptance of solidarities through difference.

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