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The book covers interplay between pest management strategies and safety of pollinators. Detailed information is provided on pests and pollinators of temperate, subtropical and tropical fruit crops. Most of the fruit crops are highly cross pollinated and depend upon insects or benefit from insect pollination for fruit set. Insect pests on the other hand cause major economic damage on fruit crops in tropics, subtropics and temperate. Evidently, pest management in fruit crops on one hand and providing safety to the pollinators on the other is a challenging task in the context of increasing horticultural productivity without upsetting the ecological balance. This book aims to integrate and develop pest control strategies in a way to minimize their impact on beneficial insect species such as natural enemies and pollinators to enhance fruit production and quality. The book covers interplay between pest management strategies and safety of pollinators. Detailed information is provided on pests and pollinators of temperate, subtropical and tropical fruit crops. Pollinators play a crucial role in flowering plant reproduction and in the production of most fruits and vegetables. Most of the fruit crops are highly cross pollinated and depend upon insects or benefit from insect pollination for fruit set. Insect pests on the other hand cause major economic damage on fruit crops in tropics, subtropics and temperate. Evidently, pest management in fruit crops on one hand and providing safety to the pollinators on the other is a challenging task in the context of increasing horticultural productivity without upsetting the ecological balance. This book aims to integrate and develop pest control strategies in a way to minimize their impact on beneficial insect species such as natural enemies and pollinators to enhance fruit production and quality. Most of the fruit crops are highly cross pollinated and depend upon insects or benefit from insect pollination for fruit set. Insect pests on the other hand cause major economic damage on fruit crops in tropics, subtropics and temperate. Evidently, pest management in fruit crops on one hand and providing safety to the pollinators on the other is a challenging task in the context of increasing horticultural productivity without upsetting the ecological balance. This book aims to integrate and develop pest control strategies in a way to minimize their impact on beneficial insect species such as natural enemies and pollinators to enhance fruit production and quality. The book covers interplay between pest management strategies and safety of pollinators.
Recent studies have revealed remarkable complexity and diversity in orchid-pollinator relationships. These studies comprise a vast literature currently scattered in numerous, often obscure, journals and books. The Pollination Biology of North American Orchids brings together, for the first time, a comprehensive treatment of this information for all native and introduced North American orchids found north of Mexico and Florida. It provides detailed information on genetic compatibility, breeding systems, pollinators, pollination mechanisms, fruiting success, and limiting factors for each species. Distribution, habitat, and floral morphology are also summarized. In addition, detailed line drawings emphasize orchid reproductive organs and their adaptation to known pollinators. This, the first of two volumes, furnishes a brief introduction to the general morphology of the orchid flower and the terminology used to describe orchid breeding systems and reproductive strategies. It treats the lady’s-slippers of genus Cypripedium, subfamily Cypripedioideae, and nine genera of the subfamily Orchidoideae, including the diverse rein orchids of genus Platanthera. The Pollination Biology of North American Orchids will be of interest to both regional and international audiences including: Researchers and students in this field of study who are currently required to search through the scattered literature to obtain the information gathered here. Researchers and students in related fields with an interest in the co-evolution of plants and insects. Conservation specialists who need to understand both the details of orchid reproduction and the identity of primary pollinators in order to properly manage the land for both. Orchid breeders who require accurate and current information on orchid breeding systems. General readers with an interest in orchid biology. Charles Argue, Ph.D., is a plant biologist at the University of Minnesota specializing in the study of pollen grains. His articles have appeared in numerous journals including the American Journal of Botany, International Journal of Plant Sciences (formerly Botanical Gazette), Botany (formerly Canadian Journal of Botany), Grana, Pollen et Spores, North American Native Orchid Journal, The Native Orchid Conference Journal, Fremontia, and as chapters in a number of books.
Recent studies have revealed remarkable complexity and diversity in orchid-pollinator relationships. These studies comprise a vast literature currently scattered in numerous, often obscure, journals and books. The Pollination Biology of North American Orchids brings together, for the first time, a comprehensive treatment of this information for all native and introduced North American orchids found north of Mexico and Florida. It provides detailed information on genetic compatibility, breeding systems, pollinators, pollination mechanisms, fruiting success, and limiting factors for each species. Distribution, habitat, and floral morphology are also summarized. In addition, detailed line drawings emphasize orchid reproductive organs and their adaptation to known pollinators. This, the first of two volumes, furnishes a brief introduction to the general morphology of the orchid flower and the terminology used to describe orchid breeding systems and reproductive strategies. It treats the lady’s-slippers of genus Cypripedium, subfamily Cypripedioideae, and nine genera of the subfamily Orchidoideae, including the diverse rein orchids of genus Platanthera. The Pollination Biology of North American Orchids will be of interest to both regional and international audiences including: Researchers and students in this field of study who are currently required to search through the scattered literature to obtain the information gathered here. Researchers and students in related fields with an interest in the co-evolution of plants and insects. Conservation specialists who need to understand both the details of orchid reproduction and the identity of primary pollinators in order to properly manage the land for both. Orchid breeders who require accurate and current information on orchid breeding systems. General readers with an interest in orchid biology. Charles Argue, Ph.D., is a plant biologist at the University of Minnesota specializing in the study of pollen grains. His articles have appeared in numerous journals including the American Journal of Botany, International Journal of Plant Sciences (formerly Botanical Gazette), Botany (formerly Canadian Journal of Botany), Grana, Pollen et Spores, North American Native Orchid Journal, The Native Orchid Conference Journal, Fremontia, and as chapters in a number of books.
More than twenty years ago, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations contributed to the growing recognition of the role of pollination in agricultural production, with the publication of “The Pollination of Cultivated Plants in the Tropics”. Since that time, the appreciation of pollinators has grown, alongside the realization that we stand to lose them. But our knowledge and understanding of crop pollination, pollinator biology, and best management practices has also expanded over this time. This volume is the first of two “compendiums for practitioners”, sharing expert knowledge on all dimensions of crop pollination in both temperate and tropical zones. The focus in this first volume is on applied crop and system-specific pollination.
The coverage of this volume ranges from Cycads and Pines of Gymnosperms to monocot genera of significance in phylogeny, agri-horticulture and commerce. The previous volume (1C), dealt with dicot counterparts. Noteworthy features of the volume include molecular phylogeny of Cycads, correlation of genomics and micro habitat in Pinus, genome studies in oil and datepalm, correlation of molecular data with habit in orchids, congruence of karyotype and molecular data in Festuca and analysis of putative ancestors in Avena. The volume will be of interest to all students of genomics interested in phylogeny, agri-horticulture and commercial plants.
Floral initiation and development. Floral physiology and breeding systems. Pollination. The female-male interaction. Seed and fruit development. Ripening and dispersal. Genetic consequences of variation in reproductive biology. Fruit- and seed-production management and tree breeding.
Kew Record of Taxonomic Literature Relating to Vascular Plants

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