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This is Chronicle I of III. In this chronicle I take you deep into my soul. I was beautiful, young and innocent, so unaware of the danger and disappointment that was waiting for me around the corner. I share in unlimited detail, my first experience having sex, my struggle with poverty and homelessness. My fight with mental, physical, and sexual abuse, and worst of all, rape. I withhold nothing in this book. I wrote the chronicles, got ready to publish them, then I got scared.So, I put them in a closet on a shelf and I locked them away for more than twenty years. Now, I have taken them out and I am finally ready to reveal them. I hope by telling my story, I can be encouraging to those of you who have experienced similar tragedies. Please know that you are not alone. Maybe some of you are still suffering or struggling. Please know that joy is around the corner. Sometimes we just have to open our eyes and our hearts and grab it.
Right up to election day many polls showed Kerry leading Bush by a significant margin, and early exit polling confirmed this misapprehension. Why were the polls so wrong and what does it mean to be ahead in the polls? How ephemeral are these leads at different stages of the campaign? Who sponsors the polls? How are they conducted? What do they mean? For the third presidential election running, Michael W. Traugott and Paul J. Lavrakas give voters everything they need to know about election polls and why it matters that we understand them. If statistics are worse than lies, just think what misreading the polls can do! Visit our website for sample chapters!
Conducting computer analyses for the purposes of revealing information of significance to the press represents an extension of one of the most important forms of American journalism into the contemporary era of new technologies. Investigative reporting had its start with the establishment of the metropolitan newspaper during the early decades of the 1900s. At the time, it was a continuation of the evolving tradition of freedom of the press that had characterized American political life since colonial times. As it developed, investigative reporting stressed facts rather than the opinions of the editor or reporter. In turn, that tradition had its own intellectual roots. Today, computer-assisted investigative reporting (CAIR) extends that "marketplace of ideas" into systematic examinations of the electronic records of government. In addition, computer analyses of other kinds of information systematically gathered by journalists can provide the press with insights into trends and patterns unlikely to be revealed by other means. This unique volume addresses procedures and issues in investigative journalism that have not been explained in other publications. It sets forth -- for the first time -- a detailed and specific methodology for conducting computer-assisted investigative analyses of both large and small scale electronic records of government and other agencies. That methodology consists of the logic of inquiry, strategies for reaching valid conclusions, and rules for reporting what has been revealed by the analyses to the public in clear ways. Such systematic methodologies are essential in social and other sciences and the development of a counterpart for investigative journalism has been badly needed. That systematic methodology is developed within a context that explains the origin and major characteristics of those elements that have come together in American society to make computer-assisted investigative reporting both possible and increasingly a part of standard newsroom practices. These include the development of traditional investigative journalism, the evolution of computer technology, the use of computers by government to keep records, the legal evolution of freedom of information laws, the rapid adoption of computers in newsrooms, the increasing importance of precision journalism, and the sharp increase in recent times of computer-assisted investigative reporting by American newspapers both large and small. The issues addressed in this book are discussed in a very readable context with an abundance of examples and illustrations drawn from the real world of journalism as it is practiced daily in newsrooms around the country. Explanations of concepts, principles, and procedures are set forth in layperson's terms that require very little in the way of knowledge of computers or statistical methods.
This collection of original articles reflects the fascinating spectrum of practices, trends and values within the journalistic profession. It is perhaps the only significant work that documents the variety of ways in which this craft is both practised and viewed. Contributors including journalists, freelance writers, academics and media practitioners cover diverse issues such as gender and identity in the popular press; sports journalism; urban reporting; embedded journalists; censorship; and alternative media.
For thirty-five years and through thirteen editions, Jim Henslin's Down to Earth Sociology has opened new windows onto the social realities that shape our world. Now in its fourteenth edition, the most popular anthology in sociology includes new articles on our changing world while also retaining its classic must-read essays. Focusing on social interaction in everyday life, the forty-six selections bring students face-to-face with the twin projects of contemporary sociology: understanding the individual's experience of society and analyzing social structure. The fourteenth edition's exceptional new readings include selections on the role of sympathy in everyday life, mistaken perceptions of the American family, the effects of a criminal record on getting a job, and the major social trends affecting our future. Together with these essential new articles, the selections by Peter Berger, Herbert Gans, Erving Goffman, Donna Eder, Zella Luria, C. Wright Mills, Deborah Tannen, Barrie Thorne, Sidney Katz, Philip Zimbardo, and many others provide firsthand reporting that gives students a sense of "being there." Henslin also explains basic methods of social research, providing insight into how sociologists explore the social world. The selections in Down to Earth Sociology highlight the most significant themes of contemporary sociology, ranging from the sociology of gender, power, politics, and religion to the contemporary crises of racial tension, crime, rape, poverty, and homelessness.
This professional reference provides practical information on how to manage all types of news libraries and how to take full advantage of emerging technologies.

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