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Excerpt from Proceedings of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, 19 October-7 December 1908, Vol. 13: With Communications Made to the Society, Michaelmas Term 1908 Proceedings, 1908. Easter Term. With Communications, N 0. LI. 267 - 329. Plates XVI-XXIX and other illustrations. 53. Net. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
The Westford Knight is a mysterious, controversial stone carving in Massachusetts. Some believe it is an effigy of a 14th century knight, evidence of an early European visit to the New World by Henry Sinclair, the Earl of Orkney and Lord of Roslin. In 1954, an archaeologist encountered the carving, long known to locals and ascribed a variety of origin stories, and proposed it to be a remnant of the Sinclair expedition. The story of the Westford Knight is a mix of history, archaeology, sociology, and Knights Templar lore. This work unravels the threads of the Knight's history, separating fact from fantasy. This revised edition includes a new foreword and four new chapters which add context to the myth-building that has surrounded the Westford Knight and artifacts like it.
In New England today, there are megalithic stones, stone chambers and structures, carvings and petroglyphs, even an unidentified skeleton in armor that defy easy explanation. From Maine to Massachusetts, this work presents an examination of various unexplained historical remains in New England. From the most notorious to the lesser known, it explores not only the layout and dimensions of such sites—some reminiscent of Stonehenge with their huge stones, astronomical alignments and undiscovered purposes—but also the history and possible explanations for their existence. Theories regarding Norse, Phoenician, Irish, Celtic and Native American origins are presented here in an impartial and logical manner. Sites discussed include Mystery Hill in North Salem, New Hampshire (also known as America's Stonehenge); Dighton Rock in Berkley, Massachusetts; Newport Tower in Newport, Rhode Island; and the Bellows Falls Petroglyphs in Bellows Falls, Vermont. An appendix provides information regarding sites open to the public.

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