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Why and how has civic engagement emerged in the policy process of Hong Kong as an Asian semi-democratic state? This book attempts to answer this question through examining six cases that straddle diverse policy domains. It identifies three explanatory factors, namely, the profile of a policy domain, the structure of societal interest, and the strength of the civil society sector as important in shaping the state’s strategy in managing society, hence its propensity to engage. These factors affect the outcome through dynamic interaction between the state and societal actors. The findings outlined in the book show that the development of civic engagement in Hong Kong consists of both society-led and state-led cases. Society-led development brought about a high degree of openness and inclusiveness, whereas state-led civic engagement practices tended to be tactics utilized by the state for appeasing or depoliticizing civil society. Compared with other Asian regimes, the use of ‘transgressive contention’ as a way to compel the state to engage society is a feature that stands out in the liberal autocratic regime in Hong Kong.
The inexorable advent of globalization has transformed the public policymaking process into a multi-faceted challenge that transcends traditional policymaking boundaries and forces scholars, experts, and practitioners to redefine their field in terms of both theory and practice. While every policy dilemma has a specific location in time and space, most significant policy issues— climate change, food and water, economic development, global pandemics, terrorism and violence, and migration, to name just a few—now require a collective framing of the problem and a collaborative effort to take effective action. The essays in Public Policymaking in a Globalized World offer valuable insights into how policymaking is evolving from a circumscribed field of inquiry into a truly global dialogue that can help stakeholders to focus on key issues that threaten the survival of our planet.
The APPLIED THEATRE series is a major innovation in applied theatre scholarship: each book presents new ways of seeing and critically reflecting on this dynamic and vibrant field. Volumes offer a theoretical framework and introductory survey of the field addressed, combined with a range of case studies illustrating and critically engaging with practice. Series Editors: Sheila Preston and Michael Balfour Applied Theatre: Economies addresses a notoriously problematic area: applied theatre's relationship to the economy and the ways in which socially committed theatre makers fund, finance or otherwise resource their work. Part One addresses longstanding concerns in the field about the effects of economic conditions and funding relationships on applied theatre practice. It considers how applied theatre's relationship with local and global economies can be understood from different theoretical and philosophical perspectives. It also examines a range of ways in which applied theatre can be resourced, identifying key issues and seeking possibilities for theatre makers to sustain their work without undermining their social and artistic values. The international case studies in Part Two give vivid insights into the day-to-day challenges of resourcing applied theatre work in Chile, Canada, the UK, New Zealand, Hong Kong and the US. The authors examine critical issues or points of tension that have arisen in a particular funding relationship or from specific economic activities. Each study also illuminates ways in which applied theatre makers can bring artistic and social justice principles to bear on financial and organizational processes.
When Britain and China negotiated the future of Hong Kong in the early 1980s, their primary concern was about maintaining the status quo. The rise of China in the last thirty years, however, has reshaped the Beijing-Hong Kong dynamic as new tensions and divisions have emerged. Thus, post-1997 Hong Kong is a case about a global city’s democratic transition within an authoritarian state. The Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Hong Kong introduces readers to these key social, economic, and political developments. Bringing together the work of leading researchers in the field, it focuses on the process of transition from a British colony to a Special Administrative Region under China’s sovereign rule. Organized thematically, the sections covered include: ‘One Country, Two Systems’ in practice Governance in post-colonial Hong Kong Social mobilization The changing social fabric of Hong Kong society Socio-economic development and regional integration The future of Hong Kong. This book provides a thorough introduction to Hong Kong today. As such, it will be invaluable to students and scholars of Hong Kong’s politics, culture and society. It will also be of interest to those studying Chinese political development and the impact of China’s rise more generally.
This Handbook provides a comprehensive global survey of the policy process. Written by an outstanding line up of distinguished scholars and practitioners, the Handbook covers all aspects of the policy process including: Theory – from rational choice to the new institutionalism Frameworks – network theory, advocacy coalition and development models Key stages in the process – Formulation, implementation and evaluation Agenda setting and decision making The roles of key actors and institutions This is an invaluable resource for all scholars, graduate students and practitioners in public policy and policy analysis.
This volume in 15 chapters serves as a useful overview of various significant aspects of the new trends of political participation in Hong Kong. Written by a team of experts who have been astute observers of Hong Kong Politics, the book covers a wide spectrum of topics ranging from a conventional understanding of political participation (e.g., the activities of political parties and interest groups) to a more specialized form of participation (e.g., the relationships between government and legislators in policy-making). The study of the rise of new social movements by the Post-80s generation would be of particular interest to those who are keen to comprehend the sharpening inter-generational differences. There will be a readership among academics and university students. This can also be a valuable reference for the media, policy-makers, or anyone interested in Hong Kong politics. This book is published by City University of Hong Kong Press. 香港城市大學出版社出版。
This book explores how the policy-making process is changing in the very volatile conditions of present day mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. It considers the overall background conditions – the need to rebalance in mainland China after years of hectic economic growth; governance transition and democratic consolidation in Taiwan; and governance crisis in Hong Kong under a regime of uncertain legitimacy. It examines the various actors in the policy-making process – the civic engagement of ordinary people and the roles of legislators, mass media and bureaucracy – and discusses how these actors interact in a range of different policy cases. Throughout the book contrasts the different approaches in the three different jurisdictions, and assesses how the policy-making process is changing and how it is likely to change further.
Covering the issues about political, economic, social, education and more, this book examines how critical the government is when handling challenges from past to current. With fresh perspectives and unique angles of criticism, the author provides us the clearest look at the government of today.
This book examines, in detail, the political context within which the civil service operates, including the role of the central government in Hong Kong SAR civil service policy making, the changing leadership role of Hong Kong's administrative elite, and attempts by the government to boost executive accountability since 2002.
These series of workshop papers are the second volume to be released by the Institute. The first was held in Victoria, 1987. This second one was co-hosted with the Thailand Development Research Institute (TDRC). A third one is scheduled for May 1990 in Kuala Lumpur. The workshop series is intended to link senior public policy researchers and practitioners from around the region. Papers presented address economic policy-making in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the Philippines, Japan, Thailand, South Korea, China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, and Indonesia.
The series Public Administration in Asia provides a periodically updatable resource that examines the public administrations of Asian countries looking at all the factors involved in the formulation of public policies. The Hong Kong civil service has experienced considerable change since the retrocession to China in 1997. The new political order has attempted to exert more control over the public sector, to introduce new approaches to formulating and implementing policy, and to re-define the relationships between the government and the public. In this book, the author describes the system of public administration in this changed political context, compares the way in which it now operates with that of its colonial predecessor, and analyzes the difficulties which the new regime and the public sector has faced in meeting the challenges posed by economic recession, epidemics and the fierce debates generated by its constitutional policies.
A society’s response to youth crime reveals much about its broader cultural values, social circumstances, and political affairs. This book examines reactions and policy responses to youth delinquency and crime in Hong Kong during its colonial and post-colonial periods, and in doing so, underscores the history of Hong Kong itself and its present-day circumstances. Exploring how officials have responded to youth crime in Hong Kong over time, this book tracks the emergence of a penal elitist mode of governance, highlighting concerns not only about young people’s behavior but the need for officials to establish state authority and promote citizen identification. In turn, it reveals an alternative to the ‘usual story’ about youth crime found in many western regions and provides an opportunity to begin to develop a comparative criminology. The book examines the emergence of the ‘disciplinary welfare’ tariff during the 1970s, debates and policy changes related to the minimum age of criminal responsibility and youth sex crimes, and inaction regarding the introduction of restorative justice initiatives in the post-colonial era. It also addresses the power of ‘Post-80s’ youth to protest and challenge government policies, which directly combat contemporary fears regarding the ‘mainlandization’ of Hong Kong. Drawing on archival sources, official reports and interviews with key stakeholders in the juvenile justice system, Responding to Youth Crime in Hong Kong will appeal to students and scholars interested in Chinese society, criminology, social work, sociology and youth studies.
This dissertation, "An Analysis of the Policy Making Process in Hong Kong: a Case Study of Public Housing Since 1997" by Jonathan, Ho, 何富豪, was obtained from The University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong) and is being sold pursuant to Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License. The content of this dissertation has not been altered in any way. We have altered the formatting in order to facilitate the ease of printing and reading of the dissertation. All rights not granted by the above license are retained by the author. DOI: 10.5353/th_b3828932 Subjects: Public housing - Government policy - China - Hong Kong
With China's economy and infrastructural development exploding, the world urgently needs avenues for a sustainable approach to its growth. Here Paul G. Harris explores these avenues, using Hong Kong as a case study to introduce the major concepts in sustainable development for China. Sketching out the historical and political contexts for China's environmental policymaking, he analyzes key challenges related to the country's development, including air pollution, water quality, waste, transport, and climate change. Geared toward undergraduates and the young people who will be instrumental in managing China's growth, it provides a fundamental outlook on how China can achieve its goals in environmentally friendly ways.

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