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Sugar. It's killing us. Why do we eat so much of it? What are its hidden dangers? In 1972, when British scientist John Yudkin first proved that sugar was bad for our health, he was ignored by the majority of the medical profession and rubbished by the food industry. We should have heeded his warning. Today, 1 in 4 adults in the UK are overweight. There is an epidemic of obese six month olds around the globe. Sugar consumption has tripled since World War II. Using everyday language and a range of scientific evidence, Professor Yudkin explores the ins and out of sugar, from the different types - is brown sugar really better than white? - to how it is hidden inside our everyday foods, and how it is damaging our health. Brought up-to-date by childhood obesity expert Dr Robert Lustig M.D., his classic exposé on the hidden dangers of sugar is essential reading for anyone interested in their health, the health of their children and the health of modern society. '[A] valiant . . . attempt to warn us against our lust for sucrose' Geoff Watts, British Medical Journal ' A medical classic' Jack Winkler, Nutrition Policy Unit, London Metropolitan University 'Arguably the leading nutritionist of his time' Guardian 'Yudkin was far ahead of his time with his idea of nutrition as a subject of great breadth: not just the study of the composition of foods, but the importance of enjoying a variety of fresh foods, and the recognition of the psychological and social factors that cause us to choose certain foods and avoid others' Independent 'Worldwide, around 180million tonnes of refined sugar is produced each year and the UK market alone is worth nearly £1billion. Little wonder that no one listened to eminent nutritionist Professor John Yudkin when he called sugar 'pure, white and deadly' back in 1972 and quite rightly warned of the links between excessive consumption and heart disease' Catherine Collins, Principal Dietician, St George's Hospital John Yudkin (8 August 1910 - 12 July 1995) was a British physiologist and nutritionist, whose books include This Slimming Business, Eat Well, Slim Well and This Nutrition Business. He became internationally famous with his book Pure, White and Deadly, first published in 1972, and was one of the first scientists to claim that sugar was a major cause of obesity and heart disease. Robert H. Lustig, M.D. has spent the past sixteen years treating childhood obesity and studying the effects of sugar on the central nervous system and metabolism. He is the Director of the UCSF Weight Assessment for Teen and Child Health Program and also a member of the Obesity Task Force of the Endocrine Society. His YouTube video lecture Sugar: The Bitter Truth has received over two million hits, he recently appeared on the BBC 2 documentary The Men Who Made Us Fat and his book Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease is being published in Autumn 2012.
Sugar is killing us. Why do we eat so much of it? What are its hidden dangers? One in four adults in the US are overweight. There is an epidemic of obese children around the globe. Sugar consumption has tripled since the Second World War. Using everyday language and a range of scientific evidence, Professor Yudkin explores the ins and outs of sugar, from the different types to how it is hidden inside our everyday foods and how it is damaging our health. Brought up to date by childhood obesity expert Dr Robert Lustig MD, his classic exposé on the hidden dangers of sugar is essential reading for anyone interested in their health, the health of their children and the health of modern society.
The Arrow War (1856–60) involved all the world's major powers, and could almost be called a world war because of the global economic and diplomatic issues driving it. For twenty-five years Dr John Wong has been trying to discover the true origins of the war. What began as a study of an alleged insult to the British flag supposedly flying over the boat Arrow led to an analysis of complex Chinese and British diplomacy; of the even more complex Chinese tea and silk exports; of British India's jealously guarded economic strategies and opium monopoly; of cotton supplied to the Lancashire mills by the Americans, who thereby made up their trade deficit with China occasioned by their heavy purchases of tea; of intricate Westminster politics and British global trade; of French pride and cultural priorities; of Russian intrigues and territorial designs; and of America's apparent aloofness and real ambitions.
Brown Sugar and Health is a 10-chapter book on the properties and effects of using brown sugar as a substitute for white sugar. The book first highlights human health, and then discusses the relationship of health and food. Next, the text explains why using refined (or white) sugar is claimed “deadly. It then shifts to the description of brown sugar and its actions in human body based on the experiments. Some observations on the effects of brown sugar are also examined. The text will be helpful to students and practitioners of human nutrition, food technology, and medicine.
For decades it has been nearly universal dogma among environmentalists and health advocates that cattle and beef are public enemy number one. But is the matter really so clear cut? Hardly, argues environmental lawyer turned rancher Nicolette Hahn Niman in her new book, Defending Beef. The public has long been led to believe that livestock, especially cattle, erode soils, pollute air and water, damage riparian areas, and decimate wildlife populations. In Defending Beef, Hahn Niman argues that cattle are not inherently bad for either the Earth or our own nutritional health. In fact, properly managed livestock play an essential role in maintaining grassland ecosystems by functioning as surrogates for herds of wild ruminants that once covered the globe. Hahn Niman argues that dispersed, grass-fed, small-scale farms can and should become the basis for American food production, replacing the factory farms that harm animals and the environment. The author—a longtime vegetarian—goes on to dispel popular myths about how eating beef is bad for our bodies. She methodically evaluates health claims made against beef, demonstrating that such claims have proven false. She shows how foods from cattle—milk and meat, particularly when raised entirely on grass—are healthful, extremely nutritious, and an irreplaceable part of the world’s food system. Grounded in empirical scientific data and with living examples from around the world, Defending Beef builds a comprehensive argument that cattle can help to build carbon-sequestering soils to mitigate climate change, enhance biodiversity, help prevent desertification, and provide invaluable nutrition. Defending Beef is simultaneously a book about big ideas and the author’s own personal tale—she starts out as a skeptical vegetarian and eventually becomes an enthusiastic participant in environmentally sustainable ranching. While no single book can definitively answer the thorny question of how to feed the Earth’s growing population, Defending Beef makes the case that, whatever the world’s future food system looks like, cattle and beef can and must be part of the solution.
Popularized by Michael Pollan in his best-selling In Defense of Food, Gyorgy Scrinis's concept of nutritionism refers to the reductive understanding of nutrients as the key indicators of healthy food—an approach that has dominated nutrition science, dietary advice, and food marketing. Scrinis argues this ideology has narrowed and in some cases distorted our appreciation of food quality, such that even highly processed foods may be perceived as healthful depending on their content of "good" or "bad" nutrients. Investigating the butter versus margarine debate, the battle between low-fat, low-carb, and other weight-loss diets, and the food industry's strategic promotion of nutritionally enhanced foods, Scrinis reveals the scientific, social, and economic factors driving our modern fascination with nutrition. Scrinis develops an original framework and terminology for analyzing the characteristics and consequences of nutritionism since the late nineteenth century. He begins with the era of quantification, in which the idea of protective nutrients, caloric reductionism, and vitamins' curative effects took shape. He follows with the era of good and bad nutritionism, which set nutricentric dietary guidelines and defined the parameters of unhealthy nutrients; and concludes with our current era of functional nutritionism, in which the focus has shifted to targeted nutrients, superfoods, and optimal diets. Scrinis's research underscores the critical role of nutrition science and dietary advice in shaping our relationship to food and our bodies and in heightening our nutritional anxieties. He ultimately shows how nutritionism has aligned the demands and perceived needs of consumers with the commercial interests of food manufacturers and corporations. Scrinis also offers an alternative paradigm for assessing the healthfulness of foods—the food quality paradigm—that privileges food production and processing quality, cultural-traditional knowledge, and sensual-practical experience, and promotes less reductive forms of nutrition research and dietary advice.

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