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An organized, detailed approach to quantum mechanics, ideal for a two-semester graduate course on the subject.
Over the last century quantum field theory has made a significant impact on the formulation and solution of mathematical problems and inspired powerful advances in pure mathematics. However, most accounts are written by physicists, and mathematicians struggle to find clear definitions and statements of the concepts involved. This graduate-level introduction presents the basic ideas and tools from quantum field theory to a mathematical audience. Topics include classical and quantum mechanics, classical field theory, quantization of classical fields, perturbative quantum field theory, renormalization, and the standard model. The material is also accessible to physicists seeking a better understanding of the mathematical background, providing the necessary tools from differential geometry on such topics as connections and gauge fields, vector and spinor bundles, symmetries and group representations.
Explaining the concepts of quantum mechanics and quantum field theory in a precise mathematical language, this textbook is an ideal introduction for graduate students in mathematics, helping to prepare them for further studies in quantum physics. The textbook covers topics that are central to quantum physics: non-relativistic quantum mechanics, quantum statistical mechanics, relativistic quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. There is also background material on analysis, classical mechanics, relativity and probability. Each topic is explored through a statement of basic principles followed by simple examples. Around 100 problems throughout the textbook help readers develop their understanding.
The book provides a step by step construction of the framework of relativistic quantum field theory, starting from a minimal set of basic foundational postulates. The emphasis is on a careful and detailed description of the conceptual subtleties of modern field theory, many of which are glossed over in other texts.
This is an approachable introduction to the important topics and recent developments in the field of condensed matter physics. First, the general language of quantum field theory is developed in a way appropriate for dealing with systems having a large number of degrees of freedom. This paves the way for a description of the basic processes in such systems. Applications include various aspects of superfluidity and superconductivity, as well as a detailed description of the fractional quantum Hall liquid.
Quantum field theory has been a great success for physics, but it is difficult for mathematicians to learn because it is mathematically incomplete. Folland, who is a mathematician, has spent considerable time digesting the physical theory and sorting out the mathematical issues in it. Fortunately for mathematicians, Folland is a gifted expositor. The purpose of this book is to present the elements of quantum field theory, with the goal of understanding the behavior of elementary particles rather than building formal mathematical structures, in a form that will be comprehensible to mathematicians. Rigorous definitions and arguments are presented as far as they are available, but the text proceeds on a more informal level when necessary, with due care in identifying the difficulties. The book begins with a review of classical physics and quantum mechanics, then proceeds through the construction of free quantum fields to the perturbation-theoretic development of interacting field theory and renormalization theory, with emphasis on quantum electrodynamics. The final two chapters present the functional integral approach and the elements of gauge field theory, including the Salam–Weinberg model of electromagnetic and weak interactions.
This modern text combines fundamental principles with advanced topics and recent techniques in a rigorous and self-contained treatment of quantum field theory.Beginning with a review of basic principles, starting with quantum mechanics and special relativity, students can refresh their knowledge of elementary aspects of quantum field theory and perturbative calculations in the Standard Model. Results and tools relevant to many applications are covered, including canonical quantization, path integrals, non-Abelian gauge theories, and the renormalization group. Advanced topics are explored, with detail given on effective field theories, quantum anomalies, stable extended field configurations, lattice field theory, and field theory at a finite temperature or in the strong field regime. Two chapters are dedicated to new methods for calculating scattering amplitudes (spinor-helicity, on-shell recursion, and generalized unitarity), equipping students with practical skills for research. Accessibly written, with numerous worked examples and end-of-chapter problems, this is an essential text for graduate students. The breadth of coverage makes it an equally excellent reference for researchers.
A sequel to the well received book, Quantum Mechanics by T Y Wu, this book carries on where the earlier volume ends. This present volume follows the generally pedagogic style of Quantum Mechanics. The scope ranges from relativistic quantum mechanics to an introduction to quantum field theory with quantum electrodynamics as the basic example and ends with an exposition of important issues related to the standard model. The book presents the subject in basic and easy-to-grasp notions which will enhance the purpose of this book as a useful textbook in the area of relativistic quantum mechanics and quantum electrodynamics. Request Inspection Copy
This book develops quantum field theory starting from its foundation in quantum mechanics. Quantum field theory is the basic theory of elementary particle physics. In recent years, many techniques have been developed which extend and clarify this theory. This book incorporates these modern methods, giving a thoroughly modern pedagogic account which starts from first principles. The path integral formulation is introduced right at the beginning. The method of dimensional continuation is employed to regulate and renormalize the theory. This facilitates the introduction of the concepts of the renormalization group at an early stage. The notion of spontaneous symmetry breakdown is also introduced early on by the example of superfluid helium. Topics in quantum electrodynamics are described which have an analog in quantum chromodynamics. Some novel techniques are employed, such as the use of dimensional continuation to compute the Lamb shift. Many problems are included.
This book starts from a set of common basic principles to establish the basic formalisms of all disciplines of fundamental physics, including quantum field theory, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, general relativity, electromagnetism, and classical mechanics. Instead of the traditional pedagogic way, the author arranges the subjects and formalisms in a logical order, i.e. all the formulas are derived from the formulas before them. The formalisms are also kept self-contained. Most mathematical tools are given in the appendices. Although this book covers all the disciplines of fundamental physics, it contains only a single volume because the contents are kept concise and treated as an integrated entity, which is consistent with the motto that simplicity is beauty, unification is beauty, and thus physics is beauty.This can be used as an advanced textbook for graduate students. It is also suitable for physicists who wish to have an overview of fundamental physics.
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This introduction to the mathematical foundations of quantum field theory is based on operator algebraic methods and emphasizes the link between the mathematical formulations and related physical concepts. The book begins with a general probabilistic description of physics, encompassing both classical and quantum physics, and presents the key physical notions before introducing operator algebraic methods. Operator algebra is then used to develop the theory of special relativity, scattering theory, and sector theory.
Quantum physics and special relativity theory were two of the greatest breakthroughs in physics during the twentieth century and contributed to paradigm shifts in physics. This book combines these two discoveries to provide a complete description of the fundamentals of relativistic quantum physics, guiding the reader effortlessly from relativistic quantum mechanics to basic quantum field theory. The book gives a thorough and detailed treatment of the subject, beginning with the classification of particles, the Klein–Gordon equation and the Dirac equation. It then moves on to the canonical quantization procedure of the Klein–Gordon, Dirac and electromagnetic fields. Classical Yang–Mills theory, the LSZ formalism, perturbation theory, elementary processes in QED are introduced, and regularization, renormalization and radiative corrections are explored. With exercises scattered through the text and problems at the end of most chapters, the book is ideal for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in theoretical physics.
over this stochastic space-time leads to the non local fields considered by G. V. Efimov. In other words, stochasticity of space-time (after being averaged on a large scale) as a self-memory makes the theory nonlocal. This allows one to consider in a unified way the effect of stochasticity (or nonlocality) in all physical processes. Moreover, the universal character of this hypothesis of space-time at small distances enables us to re-interpret the dynamics of stochastic particles and to study some important problems of the theory of stochastic processes [such as the relativistic description of diffusion, Feynman type processes, and the problem of the origin of self-turbulence in the motion of free particles within nonlinear (stochastic) mechanics]. In this direction our approach (Part II) may be useful in recent developments of the stochastic interpretation of quantum mechanics and fields due to E. Nelson, D. Kershaw, I. Fenyes, F. Guerra, de la Pena-Auerbach, J. -P. Vigier, M. Davidson, and others. In particular, as shown by N. Cufaro Petroni and J. -P. Vigier, within the discussed approach, a causal action-at-distance interpretation of a series of experiments by A. Aspect and his co-workers indicating a possible non locality property of quantum mechanics, may also be obtained. Aspect's results have recently inspired a great interest in different nonlocal theories and models devoted to an understanding of the implications of this nonlocality. This book consists of two parts.
In the period between the birth of quantum mechanics and the late 1950s, V.A. Fock wrote papers that are now deemed classics. In his works on theoretical physics, Fock not only skillfully applied advanced analytical and algebraic methods, but also systematically created new mathematical tools when existing approaches proved insufficient. This co
The applications of functional integral methods introduced in this text for solving a range of problems in quantum field theory will prove useful for students and researchers in theoretical physics and quantum field theory.
The majority of the "memorable" results of relativistic quantum theory were obtained within the framework of the local quantum field approach. The explanation of the basic principles of the local theory and its mathematical structure has left its mark on all modern activity in this area. Originally, the axiomatic approach arose from attempts to give a mathematical meaning to the quantum field theory of strong interactions (of Yukawa type). The fields in such a theory are realized by operators in Hilbert space with a positive Poincare-invariant scalar product. This "classical" part of the axiomatic approach attained its modern form as far back as the sixties. * It has retained its importance even to this day, in spite of the fact that nowadays the main prospects for the description of the electro-weak and strong interactions are in connection with the theory of gauge fields. In fact, from the point of view of the quark model, the theory of strong interactions of Wightman type was obtained by restricting attention to just the "physical" local operators (such as hadronic fields consisting of ''fundamental'' quark fields) acting in a Hilbert space of physical states. In principle, there are enough such "physical" fields for a description of hadronic physics, although this means that one must reject the traditional local Lagrangian formalism. (The connection is restored in the approximation of low-energy "phe nomenological" Lagrangians.
This book is a modern introduction to the ideas and techniques of quantum field theory. After a brief overview of particle physics and a survey of relativistic wave equations and Lagrangian methods, the author develops the quantum theory of scalar and spinor fields, and then of gauge fields. The emphasis throughout is on functional methods, which have played a large part in modern field theory. The book concludes with a brief survey of "topological" objects in field theory and, new to this edition, a chapter devoted to supersymmetry. Graduate students in particle physics and high energy physics will benefit from this book.
In this updated and expanded second edition of a well-received and invaluable textbook, Prof. Dick emphasizes the importance of advanced quantum mechanics for materials science and all experimental techniques which employ photon absorption, emission, or scattering. Important aspects of introductory quantum mechanics are covered in the first seven chapters to make the subject self-contained and accessible for a wide audience. Advanced Quantum Mechanics, Materials and Photons can therefore be used for advanced undergraduate courses and introductory graduate courses which are targeted towards students with diverse academic backgrounds from the Natural Sciences or Engineering. To enhance this inclusive aspect of making the subject as accessible as possible Appendices A and B also provide introductions to Lagrangian mechanics and the covariant formulation of electrodynamics. This second edition includes an additional 62 new problems as well as expanded sections on relativistic quantum fields and applications of quantum electrodynamics. Other special features include an introduction to Lagrangian field theory and an integrated discussion of transition amplitudes with discrete or continuous initial or final states. Once students have acquired an understanding of basic quantum mechanics and classical field theory, canonical field quantization is easy. Furthermore, the integrated discussion of transition amplitudes naturally leads to the notions of transition probabilities, decay rates, absorption cross sections and scattering cross sections, which are important for all experimental techniques that use photon probes.

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