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When his parents decide to move to an old house in the country, Chase Riley uses email to his friends back in Columbus, Ohio, and to his sister in college to help him deal with cicadas, deer hunters, and other changes in his life. Originally published as ChaseR. Reprint.
The idea of the village - unspoilt, unpretentious, unchanging and growing almost organically out of the landscape - is one of the most potent in the English imagination. Writers, artists and ordinary people have waxed lyrical on the theme for centuries, while today millions have left the cities in search of the rural idyll. Yet the village is plainly dying. The unchanging rhythms of village life, as experienced with little variations by generations, have vanished. But not without trace ... they exist in living memory. In the voices of men and women for whom the old ways were life-shaping realities. Richard Askwith, an award-winning writer and journalist, describes a journey in search of the quintessential English village, through dales and suburbs, down ancient lanes and estates. He captures the voices of poachers and gamekeepers, farmers and hunters, nurses and postmen, teachers and craftsmen, and demonstrates that, while the landscape more changed than we thought, the past is never so simple as we imagine.
So you’re walking out of school and parked at the gate is a new, bright red Ford Mustang with a hulk of a man in the front seat. He’s sporting a razor cut and wraparound shades. Before you can pass he’s out of the car and blocking your path. “Mind if I take a minute”—he has you by the arm now—“to tell you about the great life in today’s Army and why you should seriously think about signing up?” The armed forces are having a tough time attracting new recruits lately, in no small part due to the mess in Iraq. Young people are getting wise to the many excellent reasons not to join the U.S. Military, and this handy book brings them all together, combining accessible writing with hard facts and devastating personal testimony. Contributors with firsthand experience point out the dangers facing soldiers, describe the tricks used by recruiters, and emphasize that there really are other options, even in a sluggish economy. It’s essential reading for anyone thinking of signing up.
A guide on how to make your dream come true.
Rob Walker, columnist for The New York Times Magazine, energises the lately enervated worlds of memoir and travelogue with his book-length debut, 'Letters From New Orleans', a reconnaissance of a city obsessed with the forensic details of denial. Walker traded his New York life, including a decent media job, back in January of 2000. He and his girlfriend set up shop in New Orleans and soon after, Walker began sending, via email, 'The Letter From New Orleans' to interested parties. All fourteen pieces, along with additional material and photo spectra, are included in the book. Subjects covered include: celebratory gunfire, rich people, Michelle Shocked, the riddle of race relations today, robots, fine dining, drunkenness, urban decay, debutantes, the nature of identity, Gennifer Flowers, the song 'St James Infirmary', and mortality.
The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. It is published daily when Congress is in session. The Congressional Record began publication in 1873. Debates for sessions prior to 1873 are recorded in The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States (1789-1824), the Register of Debates in Congress (1824-1837), and the Congressional Globe (1833-1873)

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