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A magisterial, richly detailed history of the Kremlin, and of the centuries of Russian elites who have shaped it—and been shaped by it in turn The Moscow Kremlin is the heart of the Russian state, a fortress whose blood-red walls have witnessed more than eight hundred years of political drama and extraordinary violence. It has been the seat of a priestly monarchy, a worldly church and the Soviet Union; it has served as a crossroads for diplomacy, trade, and espionage; it has survived earthquakes, devastating fires, and at least three revolutions. Its very name is a byword for enduring power. From Ivan the Terrible to Vladimir Putin, generations of Russian leaders have sought to use the Kremlin to legitimize their vision of statehood. Drawing on a dazzling array of sources from hitherto unseen archives and rare collections, renowned historian Catherine Merridale traces the full history of this enigmatic fortress. The Kremlin has inspired innumerable myths, but no invented tales could be more dramatic than the operatic successions and savage betrayals that took place within its vast compound of palaces and cathedrals. Today, its sumptuous golden crosses and huge electric red stars blaze side by side as the Kremlin fulfills its centuries-old role, linking the country's recent history to its distant past and proclaiming the eternal continuity of the Russian state. More than an absorbing history of Russia's most famous landmark, Red Fortress uses the Kremlin as a unique lens, bringing into focus the evolution of Russia's culture and the meaning of its politics.
The definitive biography of the great soldier-statesman by the New York Times bestselling author of The Storm of War—winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Biography and the Grand Prix of the Fondation Napoleon Austerlitz, Borodino, Waterloo: his battles are among the greatest in history, but Napoleon Bonaparte was far more than a military genius and astute leader of men. Like George Washington and his own hero Julius Caesar, he was one of the greatest soldier-statesmen of all times. Andrew Roberts’s Napoleon is the first one-volume biography to take advantage of the recent publication of Napoleon’s thirty-three thousand letters, which radically transform our understanding of his character and motivation. At last we see him as he was: protean multitasker, decisive, surprisingly willing to forgive his enemies and his errant wife Josephine. Like Churchill, he understood the strategic importance of telling his own story, and his memoirs, dictated from exile on St. Helena, became the single bestselling book of the nineteenth century. An award-winning historian, Roberts traveled to fifty-three of Napoleon’s sixty battle sites, discovered crucial new documents in archives, and even made the long trip by boat to St. Helena. He is as acute in his understanding of politics as he is of military history. Here at last is a biography worthy of its subject: magisterial, insightful, beautifully written, by one of our foremost historians.
This volume presents the results of recent archaeological and historical studies of the Ottoman fort of Quseir, which was Upper Egypt's only direct outlet to the Red Sea at that time. Illustrated with over 100 maps, drawings, and photographs, this groundbreaking study examines a key example of Ottoman-era material culture in Egypt. With contributions from seven historians and archaeologists, Quseir traces the development and history of an important Ottoman fortress, built near an abandoned medieval port. Its establishment was part of a constant struggle by the Ottoman state to maintain control of the desert and the routes across it. Studies of the archaeological remains from the fort reveal the presence of reused stones from a Greco-Roman temple and emphasize its key role as a regional grain entrepôt and port of embarkation for Muslim pilgrims on the way to Mecca. Quseir is a portrait of a place at the boundary of two powerful cultural and economic systems. While serving as an outlet for the pilgrims and produce of Upper Egypt, Quseir also played a role in the distinctive maritime culture of the Red Sea. This study also reveals in detail for the first time the story of the struggle between the British and French for control of Quseir during the Napoleonic occupation of 1798-1801. American Research Center in Egypt Conservation Series 2
English has fast become the number one language for everything from business and science, diplomacy and education, entertainment and environmentalism to socializing and beyond—virtually any human activity unfolding on a global scale. Worldwide, nonnative speakers of English now outnumber natives three to one; and in China alone, more people use English than in the United States—a remarkable feat for a language that got its start as a mongrel tongue on an island fifteen hundred years ago. Through the fascinating stories of thirty English words used and understood in nearly all corners of the globe, The English Is Coming! takes readers on an eye-opening journey across culture and commerce, war and peace, and time and space. These mini-histories shed new light on everyday words: the strange turns of fate by which their meanings evolved and their new roles as the building blocks of the first language ever to forge a global community. Exploring such familiar terms as shampoo (from a Hindi word for scalp and body hygiene long practiced in India); robot (coined by Czech painter Josef Capek for his brother Karel’s 1921 play about man-made creatures); credit (rooted in a prehistoric phrase of sacred significance: "to put heart into"); and dozens of others, Dunton-Downer reveals with clarity and humor how these linguistic artifacts embody the resilience, appeal, adoptability, and wild inclusiveness that English, through a series of historical accidents, gained on its road to worldwide reach. These words explain not only how English has managed to link our distant and often disparate pasts but also how it is propelling humankind to a future that we can, for the first time, talk about and shape in a language that now belongs to all of us: Global English. Perfect for culture buffs, armchair travelers, and language lovers alike, The English Is Coming! is sure to inspire truly global conversations for decades to come.
They said the meek would inherit the Earth. As far as Jarek can tell, though, they must've been speaking Dutch or something, because those "meek" aliens sure did make a bloody mess of things. Even so, he wasn't about to make a fuss over the raknoth apocalypse. Not until those red-eyed bastards stole his exosuit. You don't steal a man's exosuit... But when Jarek's quest for vengeance runs him up against an alien stronghold and a blonde arcanist who throws around grown men like telekinetic frisbees, he soon learns there's far worse than missing exosuits to worry about. And if he and his fiery new friend don't put a stop to it, they may just be looking at Apocalypse Number Two... Don your power armor, grab your copy, and join Jarek and Rachel for a rip-roaring sci-fi thrill-ride today! Warning: This book contains big hearts, BIGGER swords, and a whole metric crap-ton of high-octane badassery. Also, swears. And snark. LOTS of snark. Read at your own risk.
The Penguins Ate My Postcards tells the story of one womans connections with people and places as she traveled around the world. It consists of essays, grouped by theme, of varying lengths and moods. They can be read in any order and independently of one another. Sections One provides anecdotes about people the author met in the USSR, Australia, Cambodia, and Europe. Most of their stories are light and entertaining, but they all identify some characteristics of human beings in specific situations all of us have faced. Section Two through Section Five describe some of the places the author has traveled. She combines her feelings as she stood atop mountains or glaciers and watched the sun set behind them with the reality of the beauty she was capturing with her camera. Some of the essays are memoirs from the time when Communism ruled a vast part of the world, and traveling was different in Iron Curtain countries from what it is now. Shell take you on her taxi ride through Checkpoint Charlie in Berlin and on her train ride from Leningrad through the Baltic countries and Poland into East Berlin. Because the author was a teacher, shell share with you some of the literary and historic sites she visited, combining some facts with her impressions and some incidents that occurred in those places. Youll laugh along with her as she compares the people she met with beloved literary characters youll remember from your high school and college English classes. Youll become pensive when she relates stories about genocide and civil strife in some of the Asian countries she has visited. Youll share some of her professional experiences as she visited schools in South Africa, Cambodia, England, China, and Vietnam, with her focus being on the conditions in which teachers and students interacted for learning. Youll remember the children. Some of the essays contain anecdotes about encounters with penguins in Antarctica, polar bears in the tundra, kangaroos in Australia, and camels in Egypt. The settings of her tales are diverse, and the enjoyment of being close to wild animals in their native habitat is strong. Youll walk alongside waterfalls, down mountain trails, within the remains of ancient civilizations, and in buildings constructed for some unique reasons. Section Six deals with the benefits of traveling, as the author illustrates some of the rules governing safe travel, especially for a woman traveling alone. She writes about the danger she encountered when the airplane tires blew while the plane was above the Himalayan Mountains, and when she walked alone in some remote places. She provides humorous stories dealing with language differences in European countries. One essay extols the value of having a competent travel agent and tour guide, again with anecdotes that identify the relationship she had with agents who prepared some of her trips. Finally, the book answers the most frequently asked question of experienced travelers: Whats your favorite place? The Penguins Ate My Postcards is an enjoyable collection of informal, personal essays that will keep you interested in the people and places being featured as they give you a strong impression of the location in which the events occurred. These essays are not the result of someones imagination; the incidents actually happened, and the author was an eye-witness to them. As you read, youll recognize that the author has separated life into serious situations and light, humorous moods, but she treats all the participants with the respect and sensitivity necessary to tell their stories. Perhaps, after you read The Penguins Ate My Postcards youll want to explore the world and find your own adventures. Happy reading.

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