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A report on development economics in action, by a crucial player in Nigeria's recent reforms. Corrupt, mismanaged, and seemingly hopeless: that's how the international community viewed Nigeria in the early 2000s. Then Nigeria implemented a sweeping set of economic and political changes and began to reform the unreformable. This book tells the story of how a dedicated and politically committed team of reformers set out to fix a series of broken institutions, and in the process repositioned Nigeria's economy in ways that helped create a more diversified springboard for steadier long-term growth. The author, Harvard- and MIT-trained economist Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, currently Nigeria's Coordinating Minister for the Economy and Minister of Finance and formerly Managing Director of the World Bank, played a crucial part in her country's economic reforms. In Nigeria's Debt Management Office, and later as Minister of Finance, she spearheaded negotiations with the Paris Club that led to the wiping out of $30 billion of Nigeria's external debt, 60 percent of which was outright cancellation. Reforming the Unreformable offers an insider's view of those debt negotiations; it also details the fight against corruption and the struggle to implement a series of macroeconomic and structural reforms. This story of development economics in action, written from the front lines of economic reform in Africa, offers a unique perspective on the complex and uncertain global economic environment.
McClean argues that a collective move towards stewardship within the financial industry is necessary to restore ethical behaviour and public confidence. Drawing on practical examples and offering new policy recommendations, this unique philosophical study paints a picture of what a truly ethical trading culture of the future might look like.
A frontline account of how to fight corruption, from Nigeria's former finance minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala. In Fighting Corruption Is Dangerous, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala has written a primer for those working to root out corruption and disrupt vested interests. Drawing on her experience as Nigeria's finance minister and that of her team, she describes dangers, pitfalls, and successes in fighting corruption. She provides practical lessons learned and tells how anti-corruption advocates need to equip themselves. Okonjo-Iweala details the numerous ways in which corruption can divert resources away from development, rewarding the unscrupulous and depriving poor people of services. Okonjo-Iweala discovered just how dangerous fighting corruption could be when her 83-year-old mother was kidnapped in 2012 by forces who objected to some of the government's efforts at reforms led by Okonjo-Iweala—in particular a crackdown on fraudulent claims for oil subsidy payments, a huge drain on the country's finances. The kidnappers' first demand was that Okonjo-Iweala resign from her position on live television and leave the country. Okonjo-Iweala did not resign, her mother escaped, and the program of economic reforms continued. “Telling my story is risky,” Okonjo-Iweala writes. “But not telling it is also dangerous.” Her book ultimately leaves us with hope, showing that victories are possible in the fight against corruption.
Covering Russia's attempted move towards democracy, this text includes an evaluation of the collapse of the USSR, Gorbachev's reconstruction adn the creation of the Russian state. It examines the collapse of Soviet power through the Yeltsin years, assesses Yeltsin's legacy and Putin's first few months in office, and provides coverage of the 1999 State Duma Elections and the March 2000 election of President Putin.
It doesn’t take days or weeks or months to read a book. It takes hours. READ MORE explains how. Most people readily admit that reading books is beneficial, and wish they could read a bit more, and in some cases, a lot more. But most people also have what seem like perfectly valid excuses for not reading, chief among which are lack of time, work-load and responsibility. Yes, they all seem perfectly understandable excuses until you read this book, and discover accounts of people going out of their way to indulge in the habit, from Rudi Giuliani, who, as New York Mayor during 9-11, finally arrived home at past 2 A.M. on the night of that fateful day, and still picked up a book to read; to Barack Obama who went on a one-week vacation in 2010, with over 2,300 pages of reading; to George W. Bush whose formula for reading was to enter into a reading contest with his top presidential aide, Karl Rove. Then there is the challenge of the 99% majority, for whom affordability might also be a ready excuse. Yet, Dr. Ben Carson, today a world-famous neurosurgeon and bestselling author, traces his turnaround to the reading habit instilled in him in fifth grade by his single mother who wasn’t even literate at the time. And there are several other examples. But what of the other 1%, the rich and famous, for whom, time is priceless? Bill Gates as CEO of Microsoft had a Think Week, dedicated to reading. And as Singapore Prime Minister, Lee Kuan Yew took out time to “recharge his batteries” at Harvard. A commitment to a regime of habitual reading takes more than mental conviction. It takes doing. And unlike what most people have come to believe, reading a book doesn’t take days or weeks. It takes hours. This book demonstrates how, and reveals other simple steps that anyone can follow, to develop a life-time habit of enjoyable reading, and reap its rewards.
In this wide-ranging and acclaimed book, Stephen F. Cohen challenges conventional wisdom about the course of Soviet and post-Soviet history. Reexamining leaders from Nikolai Bukharin, Stalin's preeminent opponent, and Nikita Khrushchev to Mikhail Gorbachev and his rival Yegor Ligachev, Cohen shows that their defeated policies were viable alternatives and that their tragic personal fates shaped the Soviet Union and Russia today. Cohen's ramifying arguments include that Stalinism was not the predetermined outcome of the Communist Revolution; that the Soviet Union was reformable and its breakup avoidable; and that the opportunity for a real post-Cold War relationship with Russia was squandered in Washington, not in Moscow. This is revisionist history at its best, compelling readers to rethink fateful events of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries and the possibilities ahead. In his new epilogue, Cohen expands his analysis of U.S. policy toward post-Soviet Russia, tracing its development in the Clinton and Obama administrations and pointing to its initiation of a "new Cold War" that, he implies, has led to a fateful confrontation over Ukraine.
Written by a former World Bank economist, How Does My Country Grow? distils growth policy lessons from the author's first-hand experience in Poland, Kenya, India, and Russia, and his contributions to the economic policy debates that followed the emerging market crises of 1997 to 2001, extending up to the global financial crisis of 2008-09. Based on living and working in the field, the author argues that country economic analysis is in effect a separate, integrative branch of economics that draws upon but is distinct from academic economics. The country stories recounted, reinforced by the emerging market experience since the 1980s, point to a canonical growth policy package built around three interconnected elements: the intertemporal budget constraint of the government; the micropolicy trio of hard budgets, competition and competitive real exchange rates; and managing volatility from external, but especially domestic, sources. This package is underpinned by good governance, which finds its most immediate expression in the management of the public finances. While the discussion is tilted towards developing countries, the insights have considerable relevance for advanced economies, many of which today are in the throes of their own growth-cum-sovereign debt crises.
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Necessary Nuptials Lady Grace Endicott never would have dreamed she'd be ruined by a rake. But after an innocent encounter with notorious scoundrel Lord Weston is misconstrued, her beloved sister's introduction to society—and her own reputation—are put at risk. The only way to avoid a scandal is a betrothal. Brandon Roth—Lord Weston—doesn't quite know what to think of his independent fiancée…or their growing friendship. Yet their engagement ruse is quickly becoming more than a temporary fix. If he can convince Grace that his wicked ways are now far behind him, he'll be able to prove that he wants nothing more than to care for the lovely lady…
"American quarterly of Soviet and East European studies" (varies).
Taking the Soviet collapse - the most cataclysmic event of the recent past - as a case study, this text engages students in the exercise of historical analysis, interpretation and explanation. In exploring the question posed by the title, the author introduces and applies such organizing concepts as great power conflict, imperial decline, revolution, ethnic conflict, colonialism, economic development, totalitarian ideology, and transition to democracy in a most accessible way. Questions and controversies, and extracts from documentary and literary sources, anchor the text at key points. This book is intended for use in history and political science courses on the Soviet Union or more generally on the 20th century.
An inspirational and practical book written by two high-achieving women, sharing the experience and advice of some of our most extraordinary women leaders, in their own words. From their broad experience on the world stage in politics, economics and global not-for-profits, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala and Julia Gillard have some strong ideas about the impact of gender on the treatment of leaders. Women and Leadership takes a consistent and comprehensive approach to teasing out what is different for women leaders. Almost every year new findings are published about the way people see women leaders compared with their male counterparts. The authors have taken that academic work and tested it in the real world. The same set of interview questions were put to each leader in frank face-to-face interviews. Their responses were then used to examine each woman’s journey in leadership and whether their lived experiences were in line with or different from what the research would predict. Women and Leadership presents a lively analysis of the influence of gender on women’s access to positions of leadership, the perceptions of them as leaders, the trajectory of their leadership and the circumstances in which it comes to an end, featuring Jacinda Ardern, Hillary Clinton, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Theresa May, Michelle Bachelet, Joyce Banda, Erna Solberg, Christine Lagarde and more.
The functioning of representative democracy crucially depends on political parties that mediate between citizens and the state. It is widely doubted, however, that contemporary parties can still perform this connective role. Taking seriously the ensuing challenges for representative democracy, Rethinking Party Reform advances a normative account of party reform, drawing on both democratic theory and political science scholarship on parties. Moving beyond purely descriptive or causal-analytical perspectives on party reform, the book clarifies on theoretical grounds why party reform is centrally important for the sustainability of established democracies, and what effective party reforms could look like in an age where most citizens look to parties with scepticism and distrust. In doing so, this book underlines in distinctive fashion why scholars and citizens should care about re-inventing and transforming political parties, resisting widespread tendencies of either declaring parties unreformable or theorising them out of the picture.
An analysis of EU programme management in all of the main spending areas over a 20-year period. After setting out the management framework in each area, the author examines audit evidence to build up a comprehensive performance profile.
The Integrated Ethics Reader: Reconnecting Thought, Emotion, and Reverence in a World on the Brink immerses students in astute and insightful essays by accomplished scholars and thinkers. The essays challenge readers to think through the important ethical and political issues of our time holistically. Through a series of cross-references and brief introductions, the text places the essays, seemingly about unrelated subjects, in conversation with one another. Over the course of 12 chapters, students gain new insights about politics, international relations, climate change, business conduct, the environment, and the need to push past theory to make room for the human heart as we face the difficult problems of our time. Throughout, readers are encouraged to carefully consider the ongoing conversations and debates on these issues, participate in further inquiry and deep reflection, and finally, consider how policy--both domestic and international--might be forged or improved. Presenting a new, highly contemporary approach to ethics, The Integrated Ethics Reader is an ideal resource for courses in philosophy, political science, sociology, international relations, ethics, and public policy and administration. David E. McClean is a lecturer of philosophy in the School of Arts & Sciences at Rutgers University, Newark, where he teaches courses in business and professional ethics, social ethics, and philosophy and the Black experience. He holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in philosophy from The New School for Social Research and a M.A. in liberal studies from New York University. Dr. McClean is the author of Richard Rorty, Liberalism and Cosmopolitanism and Wall Street, Reforming the Unreformable, as well as numerous academic articles and papers, and a monograph on the morality and politics of climate change.

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