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This pocket edition RHS colouring book contains forty-five beautiful floral images from the world-famous RHS Lindley Library. Each image is interpreted as a pattern to colour, taking inspiration from the forms and shapes of each flower. Use the colour images to inspire you, or give your creations colours of your own choosing. ΓΏ
This beautiful floral address book is covered with real linen cloth includes a ribbon marker. With colour-coded alphabetical sections and beautiful floral images throughout from the world-famous RHS Lindley Library, this decorative address book makes the perfect gift.
A stylish and elegantly designed address book with plenty of space to record names, addresses, telephone numbers and email addresses for all your contacts, friends and family. With colour-coded alphabetical sections, a ribbon marker and beautiful floral images throughout from the world-famous RHS Lindley Library, this decorative address book makes the perfect gift.
The Royal Horticultural Society Pocket Diary 2021 brings together a beautiful selection of botanical illustrations by Rear-Admiral John Paul Wellington Furse, part of the collection held in the world-famous RHS Lindley Library. Furse retired from the Royal Navy in 1959 and made several trips to Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Russia and Afghanistan collecting bulbs, many of which he brought back to RHS Wisley. Vice-Chairman of the RHS Lily group, he was also awarded the RHS Victoria Medal of Honour. This week-to-view diary is illustrated in colour throughout, with an internal storage pocket and ribbon marker.
Each week features a full-page color illustration and the diary includes the dates of all the RHS Flower Shows as well as the UK's national and religious holidays and astronomical information.
Anna Day and Ellie Jauncey are not your average florists. Friends first and business partners later, they formed The Flower Appreciation Society when they realised they shared a love of all things floral and a frustration with the formal arrangements preferred by many traditional florists. The bouquets and accessories they create in their London studio are relaxed, natural and breathtakingly beautiful - and packed full of seasonal blooms from local markets. In this, their first book, they will take readers on incredible, meandering journey through an A to Z of blooms - from Anemones to Zinnias and everything in between. If you're a bride-to-be doing your own wedding flowers or have ever wondered why your tulips just won't stand up straight, The Flower Appreciation Society has all the tips, tricks and wonderfully creative ideas you could ask for. Includes: Anemones and Appreciation, Bouquets and Bees, Colours and Corsages, Delphiniums and Daisies, Edible flowers and Events, Foliage and Forget-me-Nots, Garlands and Gardens, Headbands and Hydrangea, Insects and Irises, Jasmine and Jam jars, Kit and Kitsch, Lily-of-the-Valley and Latin names, Mother's Day and Markets, Narcissus and Nature, Old wives' tales and Orchids, Peonies and Posies, Quick tips and Questions, Roses and Romance, Scents and Seasonality, Tulips and Thyme, Urban legends and Unloved blooms, Vases and Valentines, Weddings and Wild flowers . . . And Xylem, Yarrow and Zinnia
How did the delphinium get its name? Which parts of the body lend their names to auriculas and orchids? Who are the gentian, lobelia and heuchera named after? Why are nasturtiums and antirrhinums connected? What does an everlasting pea have to do with Indian miniature paintings? These are some of the questions answered in Peter Parker's adventurous exploration of the mysteries of Botanical Latin. Evolved over many centuries and often thought to belong to the rarefied world of scholars and scientists, this invented language is in fact a very useful tool for everyday gardening. It allows us to find our way around nurseries; it sorts out confusions when two plants have the same English name; and it gives us all kinds of information about how big or small a plant will grow, what shape or colour it will develop, and what habitat it prefers. In his lively survey, Parker agues that Botanical Latin is not merely useful, but fun. The naming of plants draws upon geography, social and medical history, folklore, mythology, language, literature, the human body, the animal kingdom and all manner of ancient beliefs and superstitions. The book, beautifully illustrated with old woodcuts, explains how and why plants have been named, includes handy lists of identifying adjectives, and takes the reader down some of the stranger byways of human endeavour and eccentricity.

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