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All through his growing-up years, John Danalis's family had an Aboriginal skull on the mantelpiece; yet only as an adult after enrolling in an Indigenous Writing course did he ask his family where it came from and whether it should be restored to its rightful owners. This is the compelling story of how the skull of an Aboriginal man, found on the banks of the Murray River more than 40 years ago, came to be returned to his Wamba Wamba descendants. It is a story of awakening, atonement, forgiveness, and friendship. ""It is as if a whole window into Indigenous culture has blown open, not jus.
1860. An Aboriginal labourer named Jim Crow is led to the scaffold of the Maitland Gaol in colonial New South Wales. Among the onlookers is the Scotsman AS Hamilton, who will take bizarre steps in the aftermath of the execution to exhume this young man’s skull. Hamilton is a lecturer who travels the Australian colonies teaching phrenology, a popular science that claims character and intellect can be judged from a person’s head. For Hamilton, Jim Crow is an important prize. A century and a half later, researchers at Museum Victoria want to repatriate Jim Crow and other Aboriginal people from Hamilton’s collection of human remains to their respective communities. But their only clues are damaged labels and skulls. With each new find, more questions emerge. Who was Jim Crow? Why was he executed? And how did he end up so far south in Melbourne? In a compelling and original work of history, Alexandra Roginski leads the reader through her extensive research aimed at finding the person within the museum piece. Reconstructing the narrative of a life and a theft, she crafts a case study that elegantly navigates between legal and Aboriginal history, heritage studies and biography. The Hanged Man and the Body Thief is a nuanced story about phrenology, a biased legal system, the aspirations of a new museum, and the dilemmas of a theatrical third wife. It is most importantly a tale of two very different men, collector and collected, one of whom can now return home.
Conversations with a Black Cockatoo: The Poems of 2009-2013 is the final book in a trilogy written over the years when the author's mother entered the final phase of her life. It includes her illness, death, and the grieving of a son for a much-loved parent. Author Kevin Munro then uprooted his life and relocated to the Shoalhaven Region on the south coast of New South Wales, Australia. All of this occurred as he recovered from a bipolar breakdown that ended his teaching career. The poetry in this book contains all these issues that evolved as the years unfolded. This trilogy is not only stirring literature, but is intended as an educational tool to help others. All three of his books contain interactive exercises that allow readers to examine the personal experience of someone with bipolar. These exercises are primarily aimed at tertiary education students training for involvement with mental health. The exercises are rich in group discussion potential and for individual educational needs and settings. Kevin Munro lives two hours south of Sydney, Australia, and holds a master's in education from the University of Western Sydney. His first book in the trilogy was a collection of poetry titled Netted Rainbows. His second book was a collection of short stories, The Chronicles of a Stink Chicken: Episodes. He wrote the books as he cared for his dying mother and in the grieving period following her death. Publisher's website: http: //sbpra.com/KevinMunro
"There's a movie in this story." "Essential reading..." When Mounted Constable William Willshire had his troopers shoot two Aboriginal men, Ereminta and Donkey, in cold blood they left behind several witnesses, and an intriguing story. The man who shot Ereminta, Thomas, was an Aranda-Lutheran, one of the Finke River mission's first converts. This book reveals some surprising connections between the police, including William Willshire, and the missionaries. The pastoralists offered young Aboriginal men and women new opportunities outside traditional life. The frontier policemen protected the white people, serving a law that was of little help when relations between black and white descended into armed conflict. In two trials the deeds of all the players were subject to harsh scrutiny, with results that the proudly British citizens of Adelaide found hard to assimilate. The echoes of these events can be heard in the politics of race in Australia today.

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