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Presents a collection of essays that cover the topic of successful school reform.
This engaging text examines issues in education and curriculum theory from multiple critical perspectives. Students are encouraged to look at education from the "inside" (the complex processes, methods and relations that operate within schools) and from the "outside" (the larger social, economic, and political forces that have affected schools over time). Each essay begins with "Guiding Questions" and concludes with "Questions for Discussion," "Teachers as Researchers" activities, and "Suggested Readings."
Provides a thoughtful conceptual frame-work for reading and understanding teacher research, exploring its history, potential, and relationship to university-based research. In the second half, the voices of teacher researchers contrast, engage, and combine as contributors explore the meaning and significance of their approaches and findings. These authors enter into the "national conversation about school reform, teacher professionalism, multicultural curriculum and pedagogy, and language and literacy education."
Failure to meet test-based standards can produce consequences such as school closure or staff replacement. With this real-world challenge to education foremost, this book presents pertinent research and instructive case studies of two 'good' high schools. It advocates a proven strategy of small-scale, incremental change_small wins_which increases the likelihood that schools will improve despite a climate of 'do more with less.'
A systematic review of research projects into the state of education in South Africa.
This book looks at the failure of educational reform efforts to impact on the learning and performance of students due to misguided action based on a number of myths associated with school reform which remain prevalent in education.
America's fragmented, decentralized, politicized, and bureaucratic system of education governance is a major impediment to school reform. In this important new book, a number of leading education scholars, analysts, and practitioners show that understanding the impact of specific policy changes in areas such as standards, testing, teachers, or school choice requires careful analysis of the broader governing arrangements that influence their content, implementation, and impact. Education Governance for the Twenty-First Century comprehensively assesses the strengths and weaknesses of what remains of the old in education governance, scrutinizes how traditional governance forms are changing, and suggests how governing arrangements might be further altered to produce better educational outcomes for children. Paul Manna, Patrick McGuinn, and their colleagues provide the analysis and alternatives that will inform attempts to adapt nineteenth and twentieth century governance structures to the new demands and opportunities of today. Contents: Education Governance in America: Who Leads When Everyone Is in Charge?, Patrick McGuinn and Paul Manna The Failures of U.S. Education Governance Today, Chester E. Finn Jr. and Michael J. Petrilli How Current Education Governance Distorts Financial Decisionmaking, Marguerite Roza Governance Challenges to Innovators within the System, Michelle R. Davis Governance Challenges to Innovators outside the System, Steven F. Wilson Rethinking District Governance, Frederick M. Hess and Olivia M. Meeks Interstate Governance of Standards and Testing, Kathryn A. McDermott Education Governance in Performance-Based Federalism, Kenneth K. Wong The Rise of Education Executives in the White House, State House, and Mayor's Office, Jeffrey R. Henig English Perspectives on Education Governance and Delivery, Michael Barber Education Governance in Canada and the United States, Sandra Vergari Education Governance in Comparative Perspective, Michael Mintrom and Richard Walley Governance Lessons from the Health Care and Environment Sectors, Barry G. Rabe Toward a Coherent and Fair Funding System, Cynthia G. Brown Picturing a Different Governance Structure for Public Education, Paul T. Hill From Theory to Results in Governance Reform, Kenneth J. Meier The Tall Task of Education Governance Reform, Paul Manna and Patrick McGuinn
Five Broad Foundation award-winning districts are featured in Bringing School Reform to Scale. The author shares the sustainable, universally-applicable reform strategies these schools used to reduce achievement gaps and improve urban student performance.
In spite of decades of school reform, the achievement gap between English learners and English-proficient students has narrowed little. This book introduces the Sustainability Frameworka step-by-step process that will help educators at all levels increase school attendance and academic success for ELL students. This reform-navigation tool identifies patterns and trends in the deployment of a reform and subsequently allows leaders to make necessary adjustments to extend, accelerate, or terminate a given reform. Bridging the English Learner Achievement Gap offers a compelling, research-grounded way for schools with a substantial ELL population to successfully accommodate their students.
Written by an experienced district administrator who accomplished reform and an internationally recognized expert in large-scale educational change, this book offers 14 key parameters for realizing districtwide improvement.
Supporting teacher learning is a complicated and challenging task. This much-awaited book offers a practical, research-based framework for thinking about instructional leadership, along with the necessary resources and tools for improving practice. The authors identify specific structures, formats, and strategies that an instructional leader can use to support new and veteran principals and teacher leaders. They then discuss ways to think about which structures are most appropriate for particular settings, offering suggestions on the most effective way to work with these structures. This unique book combines theory with best practices to create a vision of how 21st-century instructional leaders can improve education for all students. This practical book: Describes a unique, adult learning framework.Includes a variety of tools and protocols that leaders can use to support teacher learning in schools, districts, departments, and teams.Offers instructional leaders both theory and practice-the what to do and also the why and how.Addresses a broad spectrum of instructional leaders at the district, school, and university level. “Students everywhere deserve teachers and administrators who have read this book, and who enact the ideas in it. It is a must read for principals, district level administrators, teacher leaders, instructional coaches and mentors - anyone charged with leading the learning of adults in their schools.” —Gene Thompson-Grove, Educational Consultant and Board Member, SchoolReform Initiative “Leading for Powerful Learning is the book every school leader needs. It provides the essential tools for carrying out what is arguably the school leader's most difficult task: supporting the learning of the teachers with whom they work. The authors’ insights and practical wisdom, drawn from their decades of experience in schools, will be useful not only to formal school leaders but to those serving as leaders in more informal ways.” —Tina Blythe, Harvard Graduate School of Education
The future of learning depends absolutely on the future of teaching. In this latest and most important collaboration, Andy Hargreaves and Michael Fullan show how the quality of teaching is captured in a compelling new idea: the professional capital of every teacher working together in every school. Speaking out against policies that result in a teaching force that is inexperienced, inexpensive, and exhausted in short order, these two world authorities--who know teaching and leadership inside out--set out a groundbreaking new agenda to transform the future of teaching and public education. Ideas-driven, evidence-based, and strategically powerful, Professional Capital combats the tired arguments and stereotypes of teachers and teaching and shows us how to change them by demanding more of the teaching profession and more from the systems that support it. This is a book that no one connected with schools can afford to ignore. This book features: (1) a powerful and practical solution to what ails American schools; (2) Action guidelines for all groups--individual teachers, administrators, schools and districts, state and federal leaders; (3) a next-generation update of core themes from the authors' bestselling book, "What's Worth Fighting for in Your School?" [This book was co-published with the Ontario Principals' Council.].
A much-needed counterpoint to the sweeping rhetoric of reform, this important book offers a nuanced depiction of the challenges and possibilities at the school and classroom level. Through the experiences of urban high school teachers who partner with their local university, Del Prete provides unique insight into teaching and learning in the midst of reform. He effectively illustrates why focusing on teaching practice and school cultures—more than standards and accountability—is a more fruitful way to achieve real and lasting change. With powerful portraits from classrooms serving diverse and low-income students, this book: Depicts the daily concerns and small victories of teachers determined to support all students in meaningful learning, and prepare them for postsecondary education. Characterizes the importance of a coherent school learning culture, based on one of the most effective small urban schools in the country. Illustrates the potential of university-school partnerships to support the development of teaching practices that will help close the achievement gap. Thomas Del Preteis Director of the Jacob Hiatt Center for Urban Education, and Chair of the Education Department at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. He has worked for more than two decades on teacher education, university-school partnership, and school reform. “Tom Del Prete presents a fascinating case study of teachers at three high schools that really get it right when it comes to engaging all students in challenging content and higher-order thinking. In the process, he makes a compelling argument for creating high school–college partnerships that lead to a ‘culture of learning’ that engages teachers and improves student performance dramatically.” —David Conley, CEO, Educational Policy Improvement Center, Director, Center for Educational Policy Research, and Professor, University of Oregon "School-University collaboration is a phrase far easier to roll trippingly off one's tongue than it is to accomplish with effectiveness and integrity. In this fine volume, we read an account that rings true and can guide others hoping to pull off similar difficult collaborations. It is a book well worth reading and deserves to be studied with care.” —Lee S. Shulman, President Emeritus, The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching "Del Prete provides a richly detailed account of how a team of teachers grows and nurtures a collectively built body of knowledge and practice that enables them to achieve remarkable results—year after year—with students from one of the lowest income urban communities in the state. If you want to know why we need to build a collaborative learning culture in schools, read this book. If you want to know how to do it, read it again." —Tom Carroll, President, National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future (NCTAF) "Del Prete has written a book that describes what it means to prepare for and teach in an urban high school setting. At the same time, he masterfully weaves the contexts of policy, content area, and school culture into a compelling story that outlines what high-quality teaching should look like." —Lee Teitel, Harvard University Graduate School of Education
For better or worse, many educational decisions that were once a private matter of teachers or administrators are now based on information technology. To be successful in this era, educators need to know how to use data successfully for their purposes and to understand the social forces at work. In this book, the author draws on his unique background in education policy and information systems to provide valuable insights into the education data movement. Using narratives of practice, the text discusses many current topics including value added modeling for teacher evaluation, big data and analytics, longitudinal data systems, open educational resources, and new designs for teaching.
This book aims to shed light on questions such as how leaders can develop and implement strategies to improve principals' and teachers' knowledge and skills in a systemic way, and how they can manage the process of reform in the complex environments that surround school systems today. The authors used for their example the study of a systemic reform initiative that was launched in San Diego, California in the late 1990's. The story presented in this book captures the early years of an ongoing reform.
We began, prompted by the late Chris Gonnet, Superintendent of Grande Prairie Public Schools, to explore the question 'What Makes a Great School?'in December 2010 at a meeting in Boston. We concluded that it involved many inter-connected elements, but that the key components were focused teacher leadership enabled by being empowered and resourced to make a difference. Rethinking Leadership sees evidence-informed practice as the fulcrum point for leveraging school improvement, especially if it systematically supported within a systematic way at the jurisdiction and provincial levels to build school leadership capacity. We also concluded that the framing conditions for the work of the school - the provincial/ state policies, curriculum requirements, financial arrangements, assessment regimes as well as the policies of school boards and districts - either enables or impairs the ability of a team within the school to create a great school for all students.
In her new book, Betty Demarest describes a bold agenda for education reform—one that is firmly grounded in a synthesis of educational research about learning, teaching, and the contexts of education. The author’s “learning-centered” framework includes: (1) a broad and balanced set of education goals, (2) a multi-faceted concept of achievement, (3) classroom capacity for learning, (4) systemic capacity and infrastructure, (5) shared, reciprocal accountability, and (6) systems of multiple assessments. New research-based concepts in these six areas are critically compared to older concepts behind standards-based reform and No Child Left Behind. Book Features: A comprehensive, alternative framework for future education reform that focuses on improving the core educational practices of learning, teaching, content, and leadership. A federal role that emphasizes meaningful partnerships rather than top-down control. A critique of past standards and present accountability-based frameworks, with implications of the learning-centered framework for future national policy, especially ESEA An operational definition of educational capacity, a re-conceptualization of accountability, and a sharp reversal of the relative emphasis placed on these strategies. Elizabeth J. Demarestis an education consultant living in Alexandria, Virginia. She was formerly with the U.S. Department of Education and the National Education Association. “Betty Demarest clearly defines a learning-centered framework for improving policy and practice. Practitioners can benefit from the strategies outlining a clear pathway for transforming to learning-centered practice in our nation’s classrooms.” —Gerald N. Tirozzi, executive director, National Association of Secondary School Principals “Betty Demarest’s deep experience with research and policy development allows her to re-envision reform at many levels, all based on research evidence for valid concepts and practices of teaching and learning. This book is a welcome gift to policymakers and practitioners.” —Roland Tharp, research professor, University of California, Berkeley “Demarest provides a research-based foundation for informed discussion and debate as Congress renews federal education law. Her synthesis of key issues should provide a starting point for any serious discussion of the way forward in federal education policy.” —Mary Haywood Metz, professor emerita, University of Wisconsin–Madison
In the midst of the continuing controversy over the right ways to bring change to American schools, Peter Temes's book is a firebell in the night. In Against School Reform Mr. Temes sets out a straightforward prescription for our schools which centers on the life of the individual teacher and rejects the billion-dollar school reform industry. He argues that enormous monies and millions of hours of effort have gone into reforming American schools in the past ten years, and we have precious little to show for it. As we enter a critical period in American history—a growing population, an uncompromising demand for well-educated workers, and the complexities of world politics impacting ordinary people every day—there is not more time or money to waste. In Mr. Temes's view, great teachers are the secret to making better schools. Forget the macro issues of school reform, he advises, and focus on recruiting, retaining, and supporting the very best teachers. Teaching will once again become an elite profession, and school problems will go the way of the trolley car. Against School Reform digs deep into the qualities of great teaching, with stories from real schools and with practical advice for parents, teachers, and students who want to celebrate and support great teachers. It also takes a serious look at what our schools must do to recruit and reward the best teachers in the coming era of teacher shortages. Finally, the book celebrates the power of individual teachers to make a difference in their schools and communities, as forces for bottom-up change. More tests won't fix our schools, Mr. Temes writes. Bigger, better ideas about education won't fix things either. But great teachers can fix our schools, one classroom at a time.
Looks at ways a library media specialist can effectively assist in bringing about change in a school.
“You won’t find a better book on whole-system change that covers so much ground in such an accessible form than Leading Educational Change!” —From the Foreword by Michael Fullan, Professor Emeritus, OISE, University of Toronto “This book tackles critical issues and conundrums about how to create productive educational systems by a group of exceptionally knowledgeable thought leaders from the U.S. and around the world. Both policymakers and practitioners will benefit from these valuable insights.” —Linda Darling-Hammond, Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education at Stanford University, author of The Flat World and Education “A well-edited and fascinating anthology with a wide variety of prescriptions, from the powerful to the improbable.” —Sir Michael Barber, Chief Education Advisor, Pearson “This book provides exactly what we need at this moment in the education enterprise: clear-eyed and far-reaching analyses from our brightest minds on the problems and potential solutions to delivering better educators and education amid a vastly changing, globally competitive, and interconnected 21st century.” —Gregory A. Patterson, Managing Editor, Phi Delta Kappan Magazine This collection features original essays from international superstars in the field of educational change. Each “think piece” draws on the latest knowledge from research, policy, and practice to provide important insights for creating systemic, meaningful reform. The authors directly address contemporary challenges, misconceptions, and failed strategies, while also offering solutions, ideas, and guiding questions for examination. Unique in its breadth of ideas and diversity of voices, Leading Educational Change is must-reading for education decision makers on all levels, frontline practitioners, and everyone involved with children and adolescent learning. Together with the online companion Instructor’s Guide, this is also a perfect text for educational leadership and policy courses. Contributors: Mel Ainscow, Stephen E. Anderson, Rukmini Banerji, Gabriel Cámara, Maria Helena Guimarães de Castro, Madhav Chavan, Amanda Datnow, Sherry L. Deckman, Lorna Earl, Patrick Griffin, Silvina Gvirtz, Andy Hargreaves, Alma Harris, Jonathan D. Jansen, Elena Lenskaya, Ann Lieberman, Helen Janc Malone, Barry McGaw, Pak Tee Ng, Pasi Sahlberg, Andreas Schleicher, Dennis Shirley, James P. Spillane, Louise Stoll, Esteban Torre, Yong Zhao Helen Janc Malone, Ed.D., is an educational researcher dedicated to connecting research, policy, and practice in support of student learning and positive development. Her work centers on educational change, whole-system reform, expanded learning, and K–16 pathways.

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