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Writing About Screen Media presents strategies for writing about a broad range of media objects – including film, television, social media, advertising, video games, mobile media, music videos, and digital media – in an equally broad range of formats. The book’s case studies showcase media studies’ geographical and industrial breadth, with essays covering topics as varied as: Brazilian telenovelas, K-pop music videos, Bombay cinema credit sequences, global streaming services, film festivals, archives, and more. With the expertise of over forty esteemed media scholars, the collection combines personal reflections about writing with practical advice. Writing About Screen Media reflects the diversity of screen media criticism and encourages both beginning and established writers to experiment with content and form. Through its unprecedented scope, this volume will engage not only those who may be writing about film and other screen media for the first time but also accomplished writers who are interested in exploring new screen media objects, new approaches to writing about media, and new formats for critical expression.
As mobile communication, social media, wireless networks, and flexible user interfaces become prominent topics in the study of media and culture, the screen emerges as a critical research area. This reader brings together insightful and influential texts from a variety of sources-theorists, researchers, critics, inventors, and artists-that explore the screen as a fundamental element not only in popular culture but also in our very understanding of society and the world. The Screen Media Reader is a foundational resource for studying the screen and its cultural impact. Through key contemporary and historical texts addressing the screen's development and role in communications and the social sphere, it considers how the screen functions as an idea, an object, and an everyday experience. Reflecting a number of descriptive and analytical approaches, these essays illustrate the astonishing range and depth of the screen's introduction and application in multiple media configurations and contexts. Together they demonstrate the long-standing influence of the screen as a cultural concept and communication tool that extends well beyond contemporary debates over screen saturation and addiction.
This book takes up the queer girl as a represented and rhetorical figure within film, television and video. In 1987, Canada’s Degrassi Junior High featured one of TV’s first queer teen storylines. Contained to a single episode, it was promptly forgotten within both the series and popular culture more generally. Cut to 2016 – queer girls are now major characters in films and television series around the globe. No longer represented as subsidiary characters within forgettable storylines, queer girls are a regular feature of contemporary screen media. Analysing the terms of this newfound visibility, Whitney Monaghan provides a critical perspective on this, arguing that a temporal logic underpins many representations of queer girlhood. Examining an archive of screen texts that includes teen television series and teenpics, art-house, queer and independent cinemas as well as new forms of digital video, she expands current discourse on both queer representation and girls’ studies by looking at sexuality through themes of temporality. This book, the first full-length study of its kind, draws on concepts of boredom, nostalgia and transience to offer a new perspective on queer representation in contemporary screen media.
‘Made up of a lucid and philosophically alert set of interlinked ethnographies, Sabry and Mansour’s new book provides us with an ethically informed examination of the media encounters of Arab children in everyday contexts. Their rigorous attention to the ways in which social class intersects political events, gender and geography to inflect particular media encounters is tempered by their analysis of features of Arab children’s media experience that cut across contexts.’ – Shakuntala Banaji, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK Using a phenomenological and multi-sited ethnographic approach, this book focuses on children’s uses of digital media in three sites – London, Casablanca and Beirut – and situates the study of Arab children and screen media within a wider frame, making connections between local, regional and global media content. The study moves away from a conventional definition of media towards a pluralistic interpretation, and provides key ethnographic findings that reveal how the notion of home is extended across everyday spaces that children occupy. Exploring the relationship between children and media outside of the subject-object hierarchy, it re-connects them in a horizontal mapping of affectivity and intimacy. This book will appeal to scholars specializing in children and the media, digital media, media and cultural studies, media anthropology, philosophy and Middle Eastern studies. .
This book is the first critical anthology to examine the controversial history of the zoo by focusing on its close relationship with screen media histories and technologies. Individual chapters address the representation of zoological spaces in classical and contemporary Hollywood cinema, documentary and animation, amateur and avant-garde film, popular television and online media. The Zoo and Screen Media: Images of Exhibition and Encounter provides a new map of twentieth-century human-animal relations by exploring how the zoo, that modern apparatus for presenting living animals to human audiences, has itself been represented across a diverse range of moving image media.
Mind the Screen pays tribute to the work of the pioneering European film scholar Thomas Elsaesser, author of several volumes on media studies and cinema culture. Covering a full scope of issues arising from the author’s work—from melodrama and mediated memory to avant-garde practices, media archaeology, and the audiovisual archive—this collection elaborates and expands on Elsaesser’s original ideas along the topical lines of cinephilia, the historical imaginary, the contemporary European cinematic experience, YouTube, and images of terrorism and double occupancy, among other topics. Contributions from well-known artists and scholars such as Mieke Bal and Warren Buckland explore a range of media concepts and provide a mirror for the multi-faceted types of screens active in Elsaesser’s work, including the television set, video installation, the digital interface, the mobile phone display, and of course, the hallowed silver screen of our contemporary film culture.

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