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HMS "Wagtail is a river gunboat, a ship seemingly at the end of her useful life, lying in a Hong Kong dockyard awaiting her last summons to the breakers' yard. Commander Justin Rolfe is also seemingly at the end of his useful naval life, an embittered man, brooding and angry from a court-martial verdict. Then the offshore island of Santu is threatened with invasion from the Chinese mainland. The small British community must be brought out and Commander Rolfe and the Wagtail are ordered to the island. The job is regarded with sullen resentment by his crew, but to Rolfe, and even the ship, it is a job that offers the chance of a reprieve and a restoration of self respect.
Gunboat Frontier presents a different interpretation of Indian-white relations in nineteenth-century British Columbia, focusing on the interaction of West Coast Indians with British law and authority. This authority was exercised by officers, seamen, marines, and ships of the Royal Navy on behalf of the colonial governments of Vancouver Island and British Columbia and, after 1871, of Canada.
The 1911 Liverpool transport strike was more than an industrial dispute. It led to the second biggest city of the British empire being brought to a standstill as the strike committee ran the city of Liverpool. Such was the fear that the dispute might lead to revolution, the Government sent troops onto the streets of Liverpool. Events escalated out of control that Winston Churchill infamously sent two gunboats up the Mersey with the guns pointing at the city itself.Brian Benjamin's account unearths one of histories unknown stories of working class struggles and of how the transport strike was a pivotal moment in working rights. It also reveals the violence of 'Bloody Sunday,' when Police and troops charged a crowd that had congregated outside of St. George's Hall.'Send the gunboats up the Mersey,' also reveals the long forgotten near revolution of 1919. Scarcely months after the armistice of world war one, there were mutinies within the army, industrial unrest, demonstrations that led to troops and tanks onto the streets of Glasgow and Liverpool. At one point, eight years after two gunboats were sent up the Mersey so was another ship. This account brushes away and reveals the real mood of the nation still recovering from an awful war with uncertainty and high unemployment. Read also how the events of 1911, the great unrest, and the near revolution led to Nye Bevan's formation of the NHS and the welfare state. It also reveals of how our ancestors' battles from the early twentieth century led to the world that we currently live in today.If you liked Peterloo and wish to discover more unknown history and how it influences the world that we live in today, then this book is for you.Also included are articles previously published in these football times about Dixie Dean, football's first number nine, the quiet Champion, Liverpool's Joe Fagan, and how Scotland are the Godfather of Tika-taka. So, you like history and politics, you are in for a treat.
This book by world-expert Barry Gough examines the period of Pax Britannica , in the century before World War I. Following events of those 100 years, the book follows how the British failed to maintain their global hegemony of sea power in the face of continental challenges.
The Author, who lives in Shanghai, sets out to demonstrate that the British military has been at the forefront of many of the great changes that have swept China over the last two centuries.He devotes chapters to the various wars, military adventures and rebellions that regularly punctuated Sino/British relationships since the 1st Opium War 1839-1842. This classic example of Imperial intervention saw the establishment of Hong Kong and Shanghai as key trading centres. The Second Opium War and the Taiping and Boxer Rebellions saw the advancement of British influence despite determined but unsuccessful efforts by the Chinese to loosen the grip of Western domination. The Royal Navys might ensured that, by gunboat diplomacy, trading rights and new posts were established and great fortunes made.But in the 1940s the British grossly underestimated Japanese military might and intentions with disastrous results. After the Second World War the British returned to find that the Americans had supplanted them. The Communists victory in the Civil War sealed British and Western fates and, while Hong Kong remained under British control until 1997, the end of British rule was almost inevitable. But the handover was a masterly piece of pragmatic capitalism and the former Colony remains an economic powerhouse with strong British influence.
Robin W. Winks placed particular emphasis on those developments that most directly explain the nature of the modern world: social diffusion, group and national consciousness, technological change, religious identities-those aspects of intellectual history that have contributed most to our current dilemmas. In turn this means that there is more in World Civilization: A Brief History about nationalism, imperialism, or ethnic identities than there is about monarchies, feudalism, or diplomacy. The result of the strategic and intellectual decisions made with respect to this textbook is that its proportions are not the customary ones. Particular emphasis is placed on the early origins of civilizations, on Greece and Rome, and on the period of the so-called barbarian invasions, because it is by studying these periods that students may best learn how societies are formed. Particular emphasis is also placed on the period from the French Revolution on, for it is the events of the last two hundred years that have most closely shaped our present condition. This book can be read, straight through and in its entirety, as an interpretive statement about Western history written by a person who knew a good bit about non-Western history and who could thus throw into perspective the unusual, the commonplace, and the comparable in that sector of history conventionally labeled 'Western'. The text draws on over thirty-five years of discovering, in the classroom, what students themselves wish to ask about the past rather than what a body of scholars may have concluded they should wish to ask. Though this book is largely about Western civilization, it is also about world civilizations, for from the eighteenth century forward—and in many aspects of life, much earlier-the non-West has interacted with the West in such a way as to make it virtually impossible to separate one from the other when dealing at this level of generalization. As a teacher of the history of exploration and discovery, of imperialism and decolonization,
From Iraq to Bosnia to North Korea, the first question in American foreign policy debates is increasingly: Can air power alone do the job? Robert A. Pape provides a systematic answer. Analyzing the results of over thirty air campaigns, including a detailed reconstruction of the Gulf War, he argues that the key to success is attacking the enemy's military strategy, not its economy, people, or leaders. Coercive air power can succeed, but not as cheaply as air enthusiasts would like to believe. Pape examines the air raids on Germany, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and Iraq as well as those of Israel versus Egypt, providing details of bombing and governmental decision making. His detailed narratives of the strategic effectiveness of bombing range from the classical cases of World War II to an extraordinary reconstruction of airpower use in the Gulf War, based on recently declassified documents. In the first major book since the Vietnam War on the theory and practice of airpower and its political effects, Robert A. Pape helps policy makers judge the purpose of various air strategies, and helps general readers understand the policy debates.
This is an in-depth account of the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs Service, a uniquely cosmopolitan institution established in the wake of China's defeat in the Opium Wars (1842 to 43), and a central feature of the Treaty Port system. The British-dominated service was headed by the famous Robert Hart who founded a far-reaching customs administration that also encompassed other responsibilities such as marine and harbour maintenance, quarantine, anti-piracy patrols and postal services. This institution sat at a crucial juncture between Chinese and foreign interests, and was intimately linked to British interests and fortunes in the Far East. Following the establishment of the Republic in 1911 there were grave misgivings as to whether the foreign element of the Service would survive. Yet the Service grew in influence and strength, ensuring the foreign inspectorate a continued role in China's affairs. Delivering an overview of the Service, its bureaucracy, fiscal responsibilities and life for foreigners in its employ, focusing especially on the later years of the Service, Donna Brunero draws on the experiences of the foreign administration of the Service as it attempted to negotiate between Chinese and foreign expectations and interests.
With his own boat, the motor yacht Sea Fox, former naval officer Philip Vivian had hoped to earn a living free from the petty restrictions of everyday life, close to the sea he loved. Now, however, his dream is threatened by financial difficulties. So when a profitable, if legally dubious, proposition is put to him by an old naval comrade in arms, Vivian is willing to listen. But what starts out as a harmless adventure soon turns into something altogether more sinister. And Vivian finds himself trapped in a treacherous web of violence and crime, dangerously torn between his stubborn sense of past loyalties and his duty to a society he has always despised.
The publication of this book sees the completion of a monumental work listing the technical details and career histories of every significant British warship between 1603 and 1863. Following three earlier volumes, this one carries forward the story from the post-Napoleonic War reorganisation of the Royal Navy's rating system to the end of sail as the principal mode of propulsion. ??Although apparently well documented, this is a period of great complexity in the procurement and naval architecture of ships. The introduction of steam radically altered the design of vessels under construction and was later retro-fitted to others, while many 'names' lived a ghostly existence on the Navy List: ships ordered but not started, and in some cases having their intended draughts altered more than once before being cancelled entirely.??This book meticulously sorts out and clarifies these confusions _ a major contribution in itself _ but for the first time it also provides outline service histories for an era that is largely neglected. Like its companion volumes, the book is organised by Rate, classification and class, with significant technical and building data, followed by a concise summary of the careers of each ship in every class. ??With its unique depth of information, this is a work of the utmost importance to every naval historian and general reader interested in the navy of the sailing era and the formative years of the steam navy that supplanted it.
An entertaining and eye-opening biography of America's most memorable first daughter From the moment Teddy Roosevelt's outrageous and charming teenage daughter strode into the White House—carrying a snake and dangling a cigarette—the outspoken Alice began to put her imprint on the whole of the twentieth-century political scene. Her barbed tongue was as infamous as her scandalous personal life, but whenever she talked, powerful people listened, and she reigned for eight decades as the social doyenne in a town where socializing was state business. Historian Stacy Cordery's unprecedented access to personal papers and family archives enlivens and informs this richly entertaining portrait of America?s most memorable first daughter and one of the most influential women in twentieth-century American society and politics.
Critically wounded in battle, a handsome officer with amnesia grows to love beautiful Hannah Rose. Risking all he knows and loves, he confronts his memories -- including the mysterious woman he may have left behind.
Using original sources as well as the findings of demographers, ethnologists, and cultural anthropologists, Main compares the family life of the English colonists in Southern New England with the lives of comparable groups remaining in England and of native Americans. She looks at social organization, patterns of work, gender relations, sexual practices, childbearing and childrearing, demographic changes, and ways of dealing with sickness and death.

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