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The best way to teach yoga to children is with games. With 52 vibrant, easy-to-follow yoga games requiring no previous yoga experience, this book will enable you to help children become better listeners, take responsibility, gain self-control, improve behaviour, become assertive and improve self-esteem and confidence. Within these pages Michael Chissick has distilled nearly twenty years' experience of teaching yoga to children aged 3-11 in mainstream and special needs schools. He explains the ideal yoga lesson structure to transform your children's behaviour: you will learn which games to teach, when to teach them and how to teach them, and how the additional benefits of improved co-ordination, flexibility, fitness, self-calming and relaxation can be accessible to all children regardless of impairment, need, culture, shape, mood or size.
The Pawnee Mythology, originally published in 1906, preserves 148 tales of the Pawnee Indians, who farmed and hunted and lived in earth-covered lodges along the Platte River in Nebraska. The stories, collected from surviving members of four bands-Skidi, Pitahauirat, Kitkehahki, and Chaui-were generally told during intermissions of sacred ceremonies. Many were accompanied by music. George A. Dorsey recorded these Pawnee myths early in the twentieth century after the tribe's traumatic removal from their ancestral homeland to Oklahoma. He included stories of instruction concerning supernatural beings, the importance of revering such gifts as the buffalo and corn, and the results of violating nature. Hero tales, forming another group, usually centered on a poor boy who overcame all odds to benefit the tribe. Other tales invited good fortune, recognized wonderful beings like the witch women and spider women, and explained the origin of medicine powers. Coyote tales were meant to amuse while teaching ethics. George A. Dorsey (1868-1931) was a distinguished anthropologist and journalist who also wrote about the traditions of the Arapahos, Arikaras, and Osages. Douglas R. Parks is a professor of anthropology and associate director of the American Indian Studies Research Institute at Indiana University. He is the editor of James R. Murie's Ceremonies of the Pawnee (Nebraska 1989) and the editor and translator of Myths and Traditions of the Arikara Indians (Nebraska 1996).
The Gardens of Covington joyously celebrates women and friendships, families and love, laughing through the tears, thinking with the head and the heart. The ladies, so real and inspiring, will make you wish they were your neighbors. If this is your first visit to the small town of Covington, you'll feel comfortably at home in the white farmhouse with the yellow shutters on Cove road that once again teems with warmth and fresh hope for today and tomorrow. If it's your second visit, you'll be thrilled to sit on the front porch once again and catch up with old friends and neighbors. Hannah, cool-headed and calm, battles to save their beloved hills from the rapacious development that has already ruined Loring Valley, only five minutes form Cove Road. Amelia, giddy with a newfound love, abandons the ladies and her photography to please her dashing new beau. And Grace is driven to prove she has an eye for business when she and her steady companion, Bob Richardson, open the Cottage Tearoom. New friends and neighbors are introduced. Eccentric Lurina Masterson, an eighty-one-year-old bride, brings tears of joy to all when, wearing her childhood dream of white satin, she married "Old Man," who is ninety-one. And George Maxwell, the ladies' closest neighbor, provides an inspired solution to preserving Covington's lush hills and valleys. Joan Medlicott writes lovingly about the complexity and tenderness of women. she writes with honesty about relationships, about love and passion, about commitment and friendship, as well as about the intricate bonds between parents and their children. As you join the ladies of Covington through their highs and their lows, their joys and their sorrows, you will not want the book to end, nor will you wish to leave their world behind you.
“Like a Chicken on a Folding Screen” was first published in 1936 in Yeoseong (Women), a women’s interest magazine with an explicitly didactic, modernizing focus. The story is an ironic look at the traditions and superstitions that governed family life in pre-war Korea, from the perspective of a “daughter-in-law.” It is typical for Korean women to not change their name after marriage. In the case of the story’s Park-sshi, however, her last names serves as a constant reminder that she can never genuinely be one with the family she has married into. “Like a Chicken” follows Park-sshi over the course of two days, charting the ways in which she attempts to confront the disintegration of her family life as a result of her failing to provide her husband with a son and the arrival of her husband’s new mistress, Byeon-sshi.
Gringo on a Chicken Bus details the unforgettable and delightful experiences of David Koons as he begins the adventure of a lifetime with a move to Central America in 1978 to accept a job as the new assistant director of an archaeological foundation in Guatemala City. While growing up in rural Indiana, the author had never experienced an enormous city without the safety net of friends or family. He shares the fascinating details of how he embarked on a journey as a young man to war-torn Central America with only rudimentary Spanish skills, ultimately testing his confidence and self-esteem in ways he never imagined possible. As he takes his first ride on a chicken bus, where not only suitcases are stored in the luggage rack, but also eggs, cans of gasoline, and of course, chickens, David realizes he is in for several eye-opening experiences over the next few years while living in Central America. With a humorous and appealing voice, Koons offers an entertaining look into a culture with colorful traditions, a resilient welcoming people, and a countryside rich in Mayan archeology.
In Augustine and the Fundamentalist's Daughter, Margaret Miles weaves her memoirs together with reflections on Augustine's Confessions. Having read and reread Augustine's Confessions, in admiration as well as frustration, over the past thirty-five years, Miles brings her memories of childhood and youth in a fundamentalist home into conversation with Augustine's effort to understand his life. The result is a fascinating work of autobiographical and theological reflection. Moreover, this project brings together a rare combination of insights on fundamentalists' convictions and habits of mind, as well as on differences among fundamentalists. Such reflections are especially urgent in this time in which fundamentalism is prominent in political and social discourse.
WHAT IS THE FORCE That drove them on foot across the land bridge from Asia to the New World long before recorded history? That keeps Joshua Warden on the wagon train headed to the California gold fields after losing so much? That is found in a shovel full of prairie soil-demanding that Amos Krebbs put down roots? That directs Stephano Romano's return to the sea? That moved Harry Krebbs from the Kansas prairie and focuses his eyes and those of his astronaut son, Alan, on the far horizon and beyond? That keeps the feet of industrialist Gilbert Krebbs and Congressman Bobby Dobbson firmly planted in the center? That drives a Monarch butterfly across a thousand miles of desert and mountains to a tiny spot on the California coast, where she has never been, but where she must return? That guides the sleek gray fish and the badly wounded Steve Romano to seek refuge in the Sea of Cortez? That fuels William Henry Stitt and his great grandson in their unending quest for knowledge? WHAT IS THE FORCE?

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