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This book brings together international academics, policy makers and practitioners to build bridges between the real-world and scholarship on breastfeeding. It asks the question: How can the latest social science research into breastfeeding be used to improve support at both policy and practice level, in order to help women breastfeed and to breastfeed for longer? The edited collection includes discussion about the social and cultural contexts of breastfeeding and looks at how policy and practice can apply this to women’s experiences. This will be essential reading for academics, policy makers and practitioners in public health, midwifery, child health, sociology, women's studies, psychology, human geography and anthropology, who want to make a real change for mothers.
Spaces and Politics of Motherhood considers motherhood through themes at the cutting-edge of social and feminist theory including: materiality and material agency; place and memory in the formation of maternal identity; issues relating to parenting in public, and the politics of combining breastfeeding with wage-work.
Midwives and other health care professionals need to have a deep understanding of the various lives childbearing women live in order to support them insightfully and practise in a nuanced manner. The Social Context of Birth has been revised, updated and enlarged to provide an essential understanding of the different lives women live and in which they birth their children. For the first time, it also contains original primary research on the perspectives of student midwives as they progress through their three year training. This comprehensive guide provides countless valuable insights into the many different lives, experiences and expectations of women in their childbearing years in the twenty-first century, especially vulnerable women. Written by a team of highly experienced health professionals, it also covers contentious areas of maternity care, such as new reproductive technologies and fetal surveillance. A true essential for all healthcare professionals who work with women giving birth, such as midwives, nurses, health visitors and obstetricians, and wish to deepen their knowledge of women’s lives.
Marking the 10th anniversary of the Breastfeeding and Feminism International Conference, Breastfeeding, Social Justice, and Equity is the third and final volume in this series. The opening two chapters address changes over the past decade in U.S. and global policy. Part 2 focuses on the importance of centering women's experiences in conversations about infant feeding, with a particular focus on the ways women's experiences are shaped by race and ethnicity. Part 3 offers solutions and strategies across the social ecology. Breastfeeding, Social Justice, and Equity is a highly readable volume that increases our understanding of the forces that influence breastfeeding, and outlines steps we can take to improve outcomes for both mothers and babies.
Mother's Milk examines why nursing a baby is an ideologically charged experience in contemporary culture. Drawing upon medical studies, feminist scholarship, anthropological literature, and an intimate knowledge of breastfeeding itself, Bernice Hausman demonstrates what is at stake in mothers' infant feeding choices--economically, socially, and in terms of women's rights. Breastfeeding controversies, she argues, reveal social tensions around the meaning of women's bodies, the authority of science, and the value of maternity in American culture. A provocative and multi-faceted work, Mother's Milk will be of interest to anyone concerned with the politics of women's embodiment.
We all have a body, but how does it impact upon our day to day life? This book sets out to explore how ordinary women, men and children talk about their bodies, through four central themes:- * physical and emotional bodies * illness and disability * gender * ageing. A coherent collection of such empirical research, The Body in Everyday Life provides an accessible introduction to the sociology of the body, a field previously dominated by theoretical or philosophical accounts.
Implementing Continuity of Care in Breast Feeding emphasizes quality and continuity of care; management issues; and policies and procedures that support breastfeeding in the hospital setting whether in the inpatient maternity, NICU, or ambulatory care.
This book centers on the role of media in shaping public perceptions of breastfeeding. Drawing from magazines, doctors’ office materials, parenting books, television, websites, and other media outlets, Katherine A. Foss explores how historical and contemporary media often undermine breastfeeding efforts with formula marketing and narrow portrayals of nursing women and their experiences. Foss argues that the media’s messages play an integral role in setting the standard of public knowledge and attitudes toward breastfeeding, as she traces shifting public perceptions of breastfeeding and their corresponding media constructions from the development of commercial formula through contemporary times. This analysis demonstrates how attributions of blame have negatively impacted public health approaches to breastfeeding, thus confronting the misperception that breastfeeding, and the failure to breastfeed, rests solely on the responsibility of an individual mother.
This exciting book, edited by Fiona Dykes and Victoria Hall Moran and with a foreword from Gretel Pelto, explores in an integrated context the varied factors associated with infant and child nutrition, including global feeding strategies, cultural factors, issues influencing breastfeeding, and economic and life cycle influences
From the colonial period through to the 20th century, this text examines the intersection of medical science, social theory and cultural practices as they shaped relations among wet nurses, physicians and families. It explores how Americans used wet nursing to solve infant feeding problems, shows why wet nursing became controversial as motherhood slowly became medicalized, and elaborates how the development of scientific infant feeding eliminated wet nursing by the beginning of the 20th century. Janet Golden's study contributes to our understanding of the cultural authority of medical science, the role of physicians in shaping child rearing practices, the social construction of motherhood, and the profound dilemmas of class and culture that played out in the private space of the nursery.
Abstract: Objective: to explore women's and midwives' expectations, knowledge and experiences of breastfeeding initiation using Social Cognitive Theory. Design: a qualitative study using focus group discussions and individual interviews. Breastfeeding initiation was defined for this study as a process within the first 48 hours after birth. Data were analysed using qualitative inductive analysis then further deductive analysis using Social Cognitive Theory (SCT). Setting and participants: a purposefully selected sample of primigravid antenatal and postnatal women (n=18) and practising midwives (n=18) from one Health Board area in Scotland. Findings: attachment of the baby to the breast at birth was hindered by sleepy babies and the busy unfamiliar hospital environment. These resulted in mothers struggling to maintain their motivation to breastfeed and to develop low self-efficacy. Instinctive attachment was rare. Midwives who considered it was normal for babies to be sleepy and unable to attach or feed at birth did not facilitate instinctive baby behaviour. Midwives sometimes experienced lack of autonomy and environmental circumstances that made women centred care difficult. Furthermore caring for high numbers of women, dependent on their help, resulted in reduced self-efficacy for providing effective breastfeeding support. Key conclusions: interviewing both women and midwives specifically about initiation of breastfeeding has allowed for deeper insights into this critical period and enabled a comparison between the data obtained from mothers and midwives. The findings suggest that instinctive attachment is not an expectation of either mothers or midwives and results in a loss of breastfeeding confidence in both. Implications for practice: to facilitate initiation there is a need for more research to develop appropriate maternal and midwifery skills, and make changes to the cultural environment in hospitals. Social Cognitive Theory could be used as a framework in both the antenatal and immediate postnatal period to develop strategies and materials to increase women's and midwives' self-efficacy specifically in initiation. Highlights: Low self-efficacy may be due to a mismatch between expectations and experiences. Women anticipated breastfeeding help from midwives but midwives anticipated problems. The baby's instinctive feeding behaviour was not expected to lead to breastfeeding.
Fundamentals of Midwifery: A Textbook for Students makes the subject of midwifery accessible, informative and motivating, ensuring that it is an essential text for the aspiring midwife! This resource brings together knowledge from a collection of clinical experts and experienced academics to support your learning and prepare you for the challenges faced in contemporary midwifery healthcare. It presents you with the ‘must-have’ information that you need concerning both the theoretical and practical aspects of what it means to be a midwife. With extensive full colour illustrations throughout, as well as activities and scenarios, this user-friendly textbook will support you throughout your entire education programme. Fundamentals of Midwifery is essential reading for all pre-registration student midwives, as well as newly qualified midwives. KEY FEATURES: • Broad and comprehensive in scope, with chapters on: team working; antenatal care, intrapartum and postnatal care; infant feeding; public health and health promotion; perinatal mental health; complementary therapies; pharmacology and medicines management; and emergencies. • Interactive and student-friendly in approach, with activities throughout. • Brings together professional and clinical topics in one user-friendly book. • Ties in with the latest NMC Standards for pre-registration midwifery education. • Supported by an online resource centre featuring interactive multiple-choice questions, additional scenarios and activities, and links to further reading.
In recent decades, global healthcare professionals and organisations have formed a wide, evidence-based consensus that breastfeeding is usually the best option for both mother and baby. However, women and professionals alike often face a sea of shifting attitudes and values, and complex social, cultural, political and economic factors that may influence women's feeding decisions. This book examines the global evidence, and the factors that affect women's decisions around initiating breastfeeding and maintaining it through the first year of their children's lives. It outlines potential areas for development and policy change at practitioner and strategic levels, and shows how health professionals can effectively communicate and provide information to help women make unpressured but informed decisions. Breastfeeding -- Contemporary Issues in Practice and Policy is essential reading for healthcare professionals, policy movers and shapers, and all those with an interest in breastfeeding who wish to influence the development of related policies, practices and healthcare services.
It’s natural... It’s unsightly... It’s normal... It’s dangerous. To breastfeed or not? For millions of women around the world, this personal decision is influenced by numerous social, cultural, and health factors. Infant Feeding Practices is the first book to delve into these factors from a global perspective, revealing striking similarities and differences from country to country. Dispatches from Asia, Australia, Africa, the U.K., and the U.S. explore as wide a gamut of salient issues affecting feeding practices as traditional beliefs about colostrums, “breast is best” campaigns, partner attitudes, workplace culture, direct government intervention, and the pressure to be a “good mother.” Throughout these informative pages, women are seen balancing innovation and tradition to nurture healthy, thriving babies. A sampling of topics covered: • Policy versus practice in infant feeding. • Infant feeding in the age of AIDS. • Managing the lactating body: the view from the U.S. • Motherhood, work, and feeding. • The effects of migration on infant feeding. • From breastfeeding tradition to optimal breastfeeding practice. Infant Feeding Practices is a first-of-its-kind resource for researchers and practioners in maternal and child health, public health, global health, and cultural anthropology seeking empirical findings and culturally diverse information on this sensitive issue.
This book offers a forum for women to share their experiences with others. Approaching nursing as a feminist issue and one that is very important to child rearing, the book embraces the wide spectrum of women's experiences breastfeeding their children. Organized thematically and framed within a social and cultural context by a sociologist and former nursing mother of two, The Breastfeeding Café moves the subject of women nursing their children out from behind closed doors. A must-read for clinicians, breastfeeding consultants, and both new and expectant mothers who are curious about the nursing experience in all its variety.

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