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This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT'95, held near Vienna, Austria, in September 1995. Spatial Information Theory brings together three fields of research of paramount importance for geographic information systems technology, namely spatial reasoning, representation of space, and human understanding of space. The book contains 36 fully revised papers selected from a total of 78 submissions and gives a comprehensive state-of-the-art report on this exciting multidisciplinary - and highly interdisciplinary - area of research and development.
This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 3001, held in Morro Bay, CA, USA in September 2001. The 30 revised full papers presented together with three full keynote papers were carefully reviewed and selected from more than 70 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on geographical ontology and onthologies; qualitative spatio-temporal reasoning; formalizations of human spatial cognition; space, cognition, and information systems; human and machine approaches to navigation; language and space; and cognitive mapping.
This book constitutes the proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 2015, held in Santa Fee, NM, USA, in October 2015. The 22 papers presented in this book were carefully reviewed and selected from 52 full paper submissions. The following topics are addressed: formalizing and modeling space-time, qualitative spatio-temporal reasoning and representation, language and space, signs, images, maps, and other representations of space, navigations by humans and machines.
This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 1997 International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT'97, held in Laurel Highlands, Pennsylvania, USA, in October 1997. The 31 revised full papers presented were carefully selected from a total of 66 submissions. Also included are seven posters. The volume is divided into sections on representations of change, structuring of space, boundaries and gradations, topological models of space, formal models of space, cognitive aspects of spatial acquisition, novel use of spatial information, wayfinding and map interpretation, representations of spatial concepts, new approaches to spatial information.
This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 2005, held in Elliottville, NY, USA in September 2005. The 30 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 82 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on vagueness, uncertainty, and gradation; paths and routes; ontologies and semantics; ontologies and spatial relations; spatial reasoning: cognitive maps and spatial reasoning; time, change, and dynamics; landmarks and navigation; geographic information, and spatial behaviour.
This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 2009 held in Aber Wrac'h, France in September 2009. The 30 revised full papers were carefully reviewed from 70 submissions. They are organized in topical sections on cognitive processing and models for spatial cognition, semantic modeling, spatial reasoning, spatial cognition, spatial knowledge, scene and visibility modeling, spatial modeling, events and processes, and route planning.
This volume collects the papers presented at the European Conference on Spatial Information Theory (COSIT '93) held on the island of Elba, Italy, inSeptember 1993. Spatial information theory includes disciplinary topics and interdisciplinary issues dealing with the conceptualization and formalization of large-scale (geographic) space. It contributes towards a consistent theoretical basis for Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Geographic information systems are widely used in administration,planning, and science in many different countries, and for a wide variety ofapplications. Research results which relevant for GIS are distributed between many disciplines and contacts between researchers have been limited. At the same time, the development of GIS has been hinderedby the lack of a sound theoretical base. This conference was intended to help remedies these problems.
This book constitutes the proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 2013, held in Scarborough, UK, in September 2013. The 28 papers presented in this book were carefully reviewed and selected from 62 full paper submissions. The following topics are addressed: spatial change, wayfinding and assistance, representing spatial data, handling language data, spatial language and computation, spatial ontology, spatial reasoning and representation.
This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 2011, held in Belfast, ME, USA, in September 2011. The 23 revised full papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 55 submissions. They are organized in topical sections on maps and navigation, spatial change, spatial reasoning, spatial cognition and social aspects of space, perception and spatial semantics, and space and language.
This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 2003, held at Kartause Ittingen, Switzerland, in September 2003. The 26 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 61 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on ontologies of space and time, reasoning about distances and directions, spatial reasoning - shapes and diagrams, computational approaches, reasoning about regions, vagueness, visualization, and landmarks and wayfinding.
This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT '99, held in Stade, Germany, in August 1999. The 30 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 70 submissions. The book is divided into topical sections on landmarks and navigation, route directions, abstraction and spatial hierarchies, spatial reasoning calculi, ontology of space, visual representation and reasoning, maps and routes, and granularity and qualitative abstraction.
This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Spatial Information Theory, COSIT 2007, held in Melbourne, Australia in September 2007. The 27 revised full papers were carefully reviewed from 102 submissions, and they are organized in topical sections on cultural studies, semantics, similarity, mapping and representation, perception and cognition, reasoning and algorithms, navigation and landmarks, as well as uncertainty and imperfection.
Geographic information systems have developed rapidly in the past decade, and are now a major class of software, with applications that include infrastructure maintenance, resource management, agriculture, Earth science, and planning. But a lack of standards has led to a general inability for one GIS to interoperate with another. It is difficult for one GIS to share data with another, or for people trained on one system to adapt easily to the commands and user interface of another. Failure to interoperate is a problem at many levels, ranging from the purely technical to the semantic and the institutional. Interoperating Geographic Information Systems is about efforts to improve the ability of GISs to interoperate, and has been assembled through a collaboration between academic researchers and the software vendor community under the auspices of the US National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis and the Open GIS Consortium Inc. It includes chapters on the basic principles and the various conceptual frameworks that the research community has developed to think about the problem. Other chapters review a wide range of applications and the experiences of the authors in trying to achieve interoperability at a practical level. Interoperability opens enormous potential for new ways of using GIS and new mechanisms for exchanging data, and these are covered in chapters on information marketplaces, with special reference to geographic information. Institutional arrangements are also likely to be profoundly affected by the trend towards interoperable systems, and nowhere is the impact of interoperability more likely to cause fundamental change than in education, as educators address the needs of a new generation of GIS users with access to a new generation of tools. The book concludes with a series of chapters on education and institutional change. Interoperating Geographic Information Systems is suitable as a secondary text for graduate level courses in computer science, geography, spatial databases, and interoperability and as a reference for researchers and practitioners in industry, commerce and government.
The Conference on Spatial Information Theory – COSIT – grew out of a series of workshops / NATO Advanced Study Institutes / NSF specialist meetings concerned with cognitive and applied aspects of representing large-scale space, particularly geographic space. In these meetings, the need for a well-founded theory of spatial information processing was identified. The COSIT conference series was established in 1993 as a biennial interdisciplinary European conference on the representation and processing of information about large-scale space, after a successful international conference on the topic had been organized by Andrew Frank et al. in Pisa, Italy, in 1992 (frequently referred to as ‘COSIT zero’). After two successful European conferences with strong North-American participation (COSIT ’93, held on the Island of Elba, Italy; COSIT ’95, held in Semmering, Austria), the conference became a truly international enterprise when COSIT ’97 was held in the Laurel Highlands, Pennsylvania, USA. COSIT ’99 will take place in Stade, Germany. All aspects of large-scale space, i. e. spaces too large to be seen from a single vantage point, are addressed in the COSIT conferences. These include spaces of geographic scale, as well as smaller spaces in which humans, animals, or autonomous robots have to find their way around. Spatial information theory also deals with the description of objects, processes, or events in spatial environments and it forms the foundation for the construction of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and for spatial information and communication system design in general.
This third volume documents the results achieved within a priority program on spatial cognition funded by the German Science Foundation (DFG). The 23 revised full papers presented went through two rounds of reviewing and improvement and reflect the increased interdisciplinary cooperation in the area. The papers are organized in topical sections on routes and navigation, human memory and learning, spatial representation, and spatial reasoning.
"This book discusses the complete range of contemporary research topics such as computer modeling, geometry, geoprocessing, and geographic information systems"--Provided by publisher.
In an effort to further investigation into critical development facets of geographic information systems (GIS), this book explores the reasoning processes that apply to geographic space and time. As a result of an iniative sponsored by the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCGIA), it treats the computational, cognitive and social science applications aspects of spatial and temporal reasoning in GIS. Essays were contributed by scholars from a broad spectrum of disciplines including: geography, cartography, surveying and engineering, computer science, mathematics and environmental and cognitive psychology.
Now ubiquitous in modern life, spatial data present great opportunities to transform many of the processes on which we base our everyday lives. However, not only do these data depend on the scale of measurement, but also handling these data (e.g., to make suitable maps) requires that we account for the scale of measurement explicitly. Scale in Spatial Information and Analysis describes the scales of measurement and scales of spatial variation that exist in the measured data. It provides you with a series of tools for handling spatial data while accounting for scale. The authors detail a systematic strategy for handling scale issues from geographic reality, through measurements, to resultant spatial data and their analyses. They also explore a process-pattern paradigm in approaching scale issues. This is well reflected, for example, in chapters dealing with terrain analysis, in which scale in terrain derivatives is described in relation to the processing involved in the derivation of specific terrain variables from elevation data, and area classes, which are viewed as driven by class-forming covariates. Lastly, this book provides coverage of some of the issues related to scale that are relatively under-represented in the literature, such as the effects of scale on information content in remotely sensed images, and the interaction between scale and uncertainty that is increasingly important for spatial information and analysis. By taking a rigorous, scientific approach to scale and its various meanings in relation to the geographic world, the book alleviates some of the frustration caused by dealing with issues of scale. While past research has led to an increasing number of journal articles and a few books dedicated to scale modeling and change of scale, this book helps you to develop coherent strategies for scale modeling, highlighting applicability for a variety of fields, from geomatic engineering and geoinformatics to environmental modeling.
This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Spatial Databases, SSD'99, held in Hong Kong, China in July 1999. The 17 revised full papers presented were carefully selected from 55 submissions. Also included are short papers corresponding to three invited talks and industrial applications presentations. The papers are organized in chapters on multi-resolution and scale, indexing, moving objects and spatio-temporal data, spatial mining and classification, spatial join, uncertainty and geological hypermaps, and industrial and visionary application track.

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