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The atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August of 1945 unleashed a force as mysterious as it was deadly—radioactivity. In 1946, the United States government created the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) to serve as a permanent agency in Japan with the official mission of studying the medical effects of radiation on the survivors. The next ten years saw the ABCC's most intensive research on the genetic effects of radiation, and up until 1974 the ABCC scientists published papers on the effects of radiation on aging, life span, fertility, and disease. Suffering Made Real is the first comprehensive history of the ABCC's research on how radiation affected the survivors of the atomic bomb. Arguing that Cold War politics and cultural values fundamentally shaped the work of the ABCC, M. Susan Lindee tells the compelling story of a project that raised disturbing questions about the ethical implications of using human subjects in scientific research. How did the politics of the emerging Cold War affect the scientists' biomedical research and findings? How did the ABCC document and publicly present the effects of radiation? Why did the ABCC refuse to provide medical treatment to the survivors? Through a detailed examination of ABCC policies, archival materials, the minutes of committee meetings, newspaper accounts, and interviews with ABCC scientists, Lindee explores how political and cultural interests were reflected in the day-to-day operations of this controversial research program. Set against a period of conflicting views of nuclear weapons and nuclear power, Suffering Made Real follows the course of a politically charged research program and reveals in detail how politics and cultural values can shape the conduct, results, and uses of science.
Suffering Made Real
Language: en
Pages: 295
Authors: M. Susan Lindee
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-10-10 - Publisher: University of Chicago Press

The atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August of 1945 unleashed a force as mysterious as it was deadly—radioactivity. In 1946, the United States government created the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) to serve as a permanent agency in Japan with the official mission of studying the medical
Medic
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Crawford F. Sams, Zabelle Zakarian
Categories: Medical
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-06-16 - Publisher: Routledge

In the aftermath of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Crawford F. Sams led the most unprecedented and unsurpassed reforms in public health history, as chief of the Public Health and Welfare Section of the Supreme Commander of Allied Powers in East Asia. "Medic" is Sams's firsthand account of public
The Jesus I Didn't Know I Didn't Know
Language: en
Pages: 120
Authors: Tim Reddish
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-06-25 - Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

There are diverse perceptions and opinions about the person of Jesus, and these are based on various assumptions—whether someone is a Christian or not. Regardless of what differing viewpoints we may hold, since the Gospel writers, each in their own distinctive way, address the “Who is Jesus?” question, it is
Hiroshima Traces
Language: en
Pages: 301
Authors: Lisa Yoneyama
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1999-05-16 - Publisher: Univ of California Press

Remembering Hiroshima, the city obliterated by the world's first nuclear attack, has been a complicated and intensely politicized process, as we learn from Lisa Yoneyama's sensitive investigation of the "dialectics of memory." She explores unconventional texts and dimensions of culture involved in constituting Hiroshima memories—including history textbook controversies, discourses on
Strange Glow
Language: en
Pages: 512
Authors: Timothy J. Jorgensen
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-08-22 - Publisher: Princeton University Press

More than ever before, radiation is a part of our modern daily lives. We own radiation-emitting phones, regularly get diagnostic x-rays, such as mammograms, and submit to full-body security scans at airports. We worry and debate about the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the safety of nuclear power plants. But