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Freakonomics lived on the New York Times bestseller list for an astonishing two years. Now authors Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner return with more iconoclastic insights and observations in SuperFreakonomics—the long awaited follow-up to their New York Times Notable blockbuster. Based on revolutionary research and original studies SuperFreakonomics promises to once again challenge our view of the way the world really works.
'A HUMDINGER' THE TIMES BIGGER, BETTER AND MORE CONTROVERSIAL, THE INTERNATIONALLY BESTSELLING FREAKQUEL IS HERE IN A SUPER-DELUXE, SUPER-ILLUSTRATED EDITION. Steven Levitt, the original rogue economist, and Stephen Dubner look deeper, question harder and uncover even more hidden truths about our world, from terrorism to shark attacks, cable TV to hurricanes. They ask, among other things- What's a sure-fire way to catch a terrorist? Are people hard-wired for altruism or selfishness? Which cancer does chemotherapy work best for? Why is saving the planet easier than we think? With this illustrated edition, Levitt and Dubner bring alive their unique analysis and storytelling with an explosion of visual evidence to reveal the world in a bold, new way. Seeing is believing . . .
PLEASE NOTE: This is a companion to Steven Levitt’s & et al SuperFreakonomics and NOT the original book. Preview: SuperFreakonomics (2009) by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner is a follow-up to the authors’ previous book Freakonomics (2005). Like the previous book, SuperFreakonomics describes research and innovative ideas in the field of behavioral economics for the casual reader… Inside this companion to the book: · Overview of the Book · Insights from the Book · Important People · Author's Style and Perspective · Intended Audience About the Author: With Instaread, you can get the notes and insights from a book in 15 minutes or less. Visit our website at instaread.co.
Superfreakonomics—the smash hit follow-up to the remarkable New York Times bestselling phenomenon Freakonomics—is back in a new full-color, fully illustrated and expanded edition. The brainchild of rogue economist Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner that once again brilliantly challenges our view of the way the world really works is presented with a new, visual, superfreaky dimension added, enhancing the already provocative thinking about street prostitutes, hurricanes, heart attacks, and other seemingly mundane matters that made Freakonomics and Superfreakonomics part of the national zeitgeist.
In "No One Helped" Marcia M. Gallo examines one of America’s most infamous true-crime stories: the 1964 rape and murder of Catherine "Kitty" Genovese in a middle-class neighborhood of Queens, New York. Front-page reports in the New York Times incorrectly identified thirty-eight indifferent witnesses to the crime, fueling fears of apathy and urban decay. Genovese’s life, including her lesbian relationship, also was obscured in media accounts of the crime. Fifty years later, the story of Kitty Genovese continues to circulate in popular culture. Although it is now widely known that there were far fewer actual witnesses to the crime than was reported in 1964, the moral of the story continues to be urban apathy. "No One Helped" traces the Genovese story’s development and resilience while challenging the myth it created. "No One Helped" places the conscious creation and promotion of the Genovese story within a changing urban environment. Gallo reviews New York’s shifting racial and economic demographics and explores post–World War II examinations of conscience regarding the horrors of Nazism. These were important factors in the uncritical acceptance of the story by most media, political leaders, and the public despite repeated protests from Genovese’s Kew Gardens neighbors at their inaccurate portrayal. The crime led to advances in criminal justice and psychology, such as the development of the 911 emergency system and numerous studies of bystander behaviors. Gallo emphasizes that the response to the crime also led to increased community organizing as well as feminist campaigns against sexual violence. Even though the particulars of the sad story of her death were distorted, Kitty Genovese left an enduring legacy of positive changes to the urban environment.
An interdisciplinary textbook that incorporates case material and theoretical tools for the Earth changers of today and tomorrow.
Mesmerizing & fascinating. . . The Seattle Post–Intelligencer The Freakonomics of big data. Stein Kretsinger, founding executive of Advertising.com ∗∗∗Winner of the Nonfiction Book and Small Business Book Awards∗∗∗ ∗∗Used in courses at more than 30 universities∗∗ ∗Translated into 9 languages∗ An introduction for everyone In this rich, fascinating surprisingly accessible introduction, leading expert Eric Siegel reveals how predictive analytics works, and how it affects everyone every day. Rather than a how to for hands–on techies, the book serves lay readers and experts alike by covering new case studies and the latest state–of–the–art techniques. Prediction is booming. It reinvents industries and runs the world. Companies, governments, law enforcement, hospitals, and universities are seizing upon the power. These institutions predict whether you′re going to click, buy, lie, or die. Why? For good reason: predicting human behavior combats risk, boosts sales, fortifies healthcare, streamlines manufacturing, conquers spam, optimizes social networks, toughens crime fighting, and wins elections. How? Prediction is powered by the world′s most potent, flourishing unnatural resource: data. Accumulated in large part as the by–product of routine tasks, data is the unsalted, flavorless residue deposited en masse as organizations churn away. Surprise! This heap of refuse is a gold mine. Big data embodies an extraordinary wealth of experience from which to learn. Predictive analytics unleashes the power of data. With this technology, the computer literally learns from data how to predict the future behavior of individuals. Perfect prediction is not possible, but putting odds on the future drives millions of decisions more effectively, determining whom to call, mail, investigate, incarcerate, set up on a date, or medicate. In this lucid, captivating introduction now in its Revised and Updated edition former Columbia University professor and Predictive Analytics World founder Eric Siegel reveals the power and perils of prediction: What type of mortgage risk Chase Bank predicted before the recession Predicting which people will drop out of school, cancel a subscription, or get divorced before they even know it themselves Why early retirement predicts a shorter life expectancy and vegetarians miss fewer flights Five reasons why organizations predict death including one health insurance company How U.S. Bank and Obama for America calculated and Hillary for America 2016 plans to calculate the way to most strongly persuade each individual Why the NSA wants all your data: machine learning supercomputers to fight terrorism How IBM′s Watson computer used predictive modeling to answer questions and beat the human champs on TV′s Jeopardy! How companies ascertain untold, private truths how Target figures out you′re pregnant and Hewlett–Packard deduces you′re about to quit your job How judges and parole boards rely on crime–predicting computers to decide how long convicts remain in prison 183 examples from Airbnb, the BBC, Citibank, ConEd, Facebook, Ford, Google, the IRS, LinkedIn, Match.com, MTV, Netflix, PayPal, Pfizer, Spotify, Uber, UPS, Wikipedia, and more How does predictive analytics work? This jam–packed book satisfies by demystifying the intriguing science under the hood. For future hands–on practitioners pursuing a career in the field, it sets a strong foundation, delivers the prerequisite knowledge, and whets your appetite for more. A truly omnipresent science, predictive analytics constantly affects our daily lives. Whether you are a consumer of it or consumed by it get a handle on the power of Predictive Analytics.

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