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Supporting Change in Autism Services explores the theoretical and practical dimensions of improving service provision for children, young people and adults with autism. The core aim of the book is to identify and critically examine some of the key factors that either facilitate or inhibit the implementation of good autism practice at both practitioner level and workplace level. It shows practitioners and students how to successfully translate autism theory into practice across service contexts and showcases a range of practitioner case studies throughout the text in order to illustrate effective implementation. Topics explored include: controversies and ambiguities in autism policy, theory and discourse; understanding autism in an inclusive context; enabling participation; making sense of behaviour; autism and interprofessionalism; strategic planning for autism friendly services; bridging the implementation gap. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in improving services for people with autism in the education, social care, health and voluntary sectors.
This ground-breaking book gives an accessible overview and synthesis of current knowledge of relevance to the development of excellence in autism education. By situating understandings of autism within a ‘bio-psycho-social-insider’ framework, the book offers fresh insights and new ways of thinking that bring together global pedagogic practice, research, policy, and the insider perspective. Guldberg critiques current notions of Evidence-Based Practice and suggests ways of bridging the research-practice gap. She explores the interrelationship between inclusive principles, distinctive group learning needs and the individual needs of the child or young person. Eight principles of good autism practice provide a helpful framework for how education settings and practitioners can adapt classroom environments and teaching so that autistic children and young people can thrive. Written for anyone who wants to make a difference to the lives of autistic pupils, Developing Excellence in Autism Practice provides practitioners and students on education courses with tools for best practices, and shows how to draw on these to implement true positive change in the classroom.
This practical book gives detailed guidance on how to develop a tailored Applied Behavioural Analysis programme that includes the key features of ABA: detailed individual behaviour assessment, reinforcement strategies to encourage new behaviours and systematic programme implementation.
This book unravels some common misunderstandings between people with autism spectrum disorders and providers of support services, and offers practical advice on how to ensure that the needs of people with ASD are catered for effectively. Edwards emphasises the importance of understanding ASD so that services can meet a person's needs effectively.
Autism, which includes Asperger syndrome, is a lifelong condition which affects the way in which people interact with the world around them. There are estimated to be 400,000 adults with autism in England, many of whom may require specialised support. Yet the NAO found that most NHS organisations and local authorities do not know how many people with autism there are in the areas they serve, and three quarters of local authorities do not have a specific commissioning strategy for adults with autism. GPs and social care staff have low awareness of autism and how to diagnose it, with 80 per cent of GPs surveyed reporting that they need additional guidance and training in order to identify and treat patients with autism more effectively. Around 200,000 adults with autism do not have a learning disability. This group often fails to secure appropriate support, as health and social care services are traditionally configured for people with a learning disability, a physical illness or disability, or a mental health problem (which autism is not). Three quarters of local authorities said adults with autism who do not meet eligibility criteria experience or report difficulties accessing the services they require. Almost two thirds felt that current services for adults with autism are limited. Providing specialised support could improve outcomes for this group of people and their carers, and potentially enhance value for money, as the costs of establishing such support could be outweighed over time by overall savings. There are few specialised employment support services for people with autism. A lack of understanding of autism is a significant barrier to gaining employment and more training is needed for those delivering employment support and those administering benefits.
This book is a guide to effective campaigning for appropriate services for children with autism, written by PACE (The Parents' Autism Campaign for Education). Based on the real-life experiences, it explains how the system works at local and national levels and provides invaluable information about local authority structures and government policy.
The Guest Editors have assembled expert authors to cover the full clinical span of the topic autism and autism spectrum disorders. An historical perspective of the evolution of the disorder opens the issue. Next, comprehensive coverage is given to an article on the definitions, diagnostic criteria, and clinical features of autism spectrum disorders. Other articles in the issue cover the relevant topics like epidemiology, genetic syndromes and genetic testing, early diagnosis and diagnostic evaluation, and neuroimaging and neurochemistry of autism. Authors also present information on tsocial skills for the autistic child, behavioral interventions, and transitioning the autistic child into adulthood, to name a few. This issue should be very well received by pediatricians.
Moving house is difficult for anyone but especially for people with autistic spectrum disorders who face many difficulties with change. Moving house is difficult for anyone but especially for people with autistic spectrum disorders who face many difficulties with change. The Shirley Foundation funded a project by Housing Options, an advisory service for learning disability, to promote the development of housing and support for people with autism and their particular needs.
Many people with Asperger syndrome do very well in higher education because they are able to pursue their special interests. This guide offers help to their lecturers, tutors and other higher education staff on how best to support them.
As the oldest statewide program serving autistic people in the United States, North Carolina's Division TEACCH (Treatment and Education of Autistic and related Communication handicapped CHildren) has had a major impact on ser vices for these people and their families. As we move into our second decade, we are frequently questioned about all aspects of our procedures, techniques, and program. Of all the questions that are asked, however, the one that comes up most frequently and seems to set our program apart from others concerns the ways in which we work with families. To help answer this question we identified what we have found to be the major components in our parent-professional relationships, and we elaborate on these with the most current research informa tion, clinical insights, and community knowledge available through the expertise of our distinguished contributors. Our purpose was to collect the most recent information and to organize the resulting volume along the outlines of the par ent-professional relationship found most important in the TEACCH program. Thus, the four main sections of the book include these four major ways profes sionals work with parents: as their advocates, their trainers, their trainees, and their reciprocal emotional support source. To the extent this effort was success ful, we acknowledge that it is easier to organize book chapters along these dimensions than it is to provide their implementation in the field.
Recreation is important to everyone's quality of life. This includes more than half a million Americans with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) whose lives can be enriched through leisure pursuits. This book was developed to assist recreation service providers, as well as families, to understand strategies for supporting individuals with ASD in community and school recreation programmes.
Learning Disabilities: Toward Inclusion (formerly edited by Bob Gates) is one of the leading textbooks in this field. It offers real ways to improve quality of experience for people with learning disabilities in all areas of life. This new edition brings together a comprehensive and coherent collection of material from eminent authors with a wealth of professional backgrounds and roles. Its contemporary focus reflects practice developments including the impact of changing policy and legislation on the nature and configuration of services. The leading textbook for carers of people with learning disabilities A comprehensive overview of the field of learning disabilities care Well-written accessible content Activities, case studies, diagrams and further resources including useful web links the embedding of key themes across chapters to draw diverse material into an integrated whole. These are: person-centredness, values, the reality of practice, the range of ability, the range of services and national and international perspectives. chapters on advocacy, personal narratives and life story, inclusive research, risk, safeguarding, sensory awareness, epilepsy and end-of-life care online case studies and activities with critical-thinking questions and ‘hot links’ to web resources to extend knowledge and understanding thereby facilitating learning a fully searchable, customisable electronic version of the text to enable easy access and quick reference
This textbook examines the complicated and often controversial issues related to instructional programming for students with autism, with particular sensitivity to the wide range and varying effects of the cognitive, behavioral, social, and academic abilities of these students. Students with autism also provides a comprehensive overview of program development and service delivery models to overcome these issues, relying on proven, empirically validated practices to help educators to meet the challenges they face. --Book cover.
A revolution in working with difficult students began during the 1980s, with a dramatic shift away from dependence on simply punishing bad behavior to reinforcing desired, positive behaviors of children in the classroom. With its foundation in applied behavior analysis (ABA), positive behavior support (PBS) is a social ecology approach that continues to play an increasingly integral role in public education as well as mental health and social services nationwide. The Handbook of Positive Behavior Support gathers into one concise volume the many elements of this burgeoning field and organizes them into a powerful, dynamic knowledge base – theory, research, and applications. Within its chapters, leading experts, including the primary developers and researchers of PBS: (1) Review the origins, history, and ethical foundations of positive behavior support. (2) Report on applications of PBS in early childhood and family contexts, from Head Start to foster care to mental health settings to autism treatment programs. (3) Examine school-based PBS used to benefit all students regardless of ability or conduct. (4) Relate schoolwide PBS to wraparound mental health services and the RTI (response to intervention) movement. (5) Provide data and discussion on a variety of topics salient to PBS, including parenting issues, personnel training, high school use, poorly functioning schools, and more. This volume is an essential resource for school-based practitioners as well as clinicians and researchers in clinical child, school, and educational psychology.
Our understanding of the biological bases to the autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) is advancing rapidly. Over 80 genetic conditions have now been reported in people who have also been diagnosed with ASDs. Many of these conditions have specific implications for the presenting phenotype and for treatment, management, and intervention. If the basis to the presenting behavioural phenotype is not identified, this can result in a sub-optimal level of care, complications, or even permanent damage. Kenneth J. Aitken shows that the notion of a single condition known as 'autism' is no longer tenable, and challenges current trends in the diagnosis and management of these behaviours as a homogenous group by drawing on recent research into brain function, genetics, epidemiology and neurology. This volume explains the biology and genetics of ASD, and provides clinicians and researchers with a comprehensive summary of each genetic factor including the research that links it to ASD, diagnosis and treatment issues, and related animal models, as well as detailing relevant professional organisations and avenues for further research. An A-Z of Genetic Factors in Autism is an essential resource for a wide range of researchers, clinical professionals and students interested in autism spectrum disorders, including clinical and educational psychologists, dieticians, psychiatrists, and neurologists.

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