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A tale of human emotion that lays bare the heights and depths of love, passion and desire in old and new worlds…as we follow Virginia Brandon, beautiful, impudent and innocent, from the glittering ballrooms of Paris to the sensuality of life in New Orleans to the splendor of intrigue-filled Mexico. A tale of unending passion, never to be forgotten…the story of Virginia's love for Steven Morgan, a love so powerful that she will risk anything for him…even her life.
Dashing doctors, naughty nurses, and sexy stewardesses caught in webs of love, passion, betrayal, and intrigue: these are the raw materials of the romance novel--and the lusty covers that advertise them. The Look of Love presents the captivating art and stories of this ever-popular genre, from the sugary tales of the 1940s to the bodice-rippers of the 1980s. This delightful compendium of popular illustration and purple prose is aimed at the hearts of romance lovers everywhere.
Since the 1970s, romance novels have surpassed all other genres in terms of popularity in the United States, accounting for half of all mass market paperbacks sold and driving the digital publishing revolution. Romance Fiction and American Culture brings together scholars from the humanities, social sciences, and publishing to explore American romance fiction from the late eighteenth to the early twenty-first century. Essays on interracial, inspirational, and LGBTQ romance attend to the diversity of the genre, while new areas of inquiry are suggested in contextual and interdisciplinary examinations of romance authorship, readership, and publishing history, of pleasure and respectability in African American romance fiction, and of the dynamic tension between the genre and second wave feminism. As it situates romance fiction among other instances of American love culture, from Civil War diaries to Bob Dylan’s Blood on the Tracks, Romance Fiction and American Culture confirms the complexity and enduring importance of this most contested of genres.
When a literary agent is murdered, every bodice-ripping author is a suspect The nation’s most famous romance authors are often so over-the-top that they could star in their own work. Catty, eccentric, and vain, they live to make each other miserable—and Patience McKenna does all she can to stay out of their line of fire. Too smart for her own genre, she writes romance novels to pay the rent and investigates stories to stay sane. Now the romance wars are about to hit her on the home front. A few nights before the start of the annual American Writers of Romance conference, Pay comes home to find her apartment locked from the inside. When the police break down the door, they stumble onto Julie Simms, literary agent to the leading lights of romance, lying dead on the floor. When the conference convenes, Pay asks: Which of her colleagues has traded make-believe passion for real-life murder?
Originally published in 1984, Reading the Romance challenges popular (and often demeaning) myths about why romantic fiction, one of publishing's most lucrative categories, captivates millions of women readers. Among those who have disparaged romance reading are feminists, literary critics, and theorists of mass culture. They claim that romances enforce the woman reader's dependence on men and acceptance of the repressive ideology purveyed by popular culture. Radway questions such claims, arguing that critical attention "must shift from the text itself, taken in isolation, to the complex social event of reading." She examines that event, from the complicated business of publishing and distribution to the individual reader's engagement with the text. Radway's provocative approach combines reader-response criticism with anthropology and feminist psychology. Asking readers themselves to explore their reading motives, habits, and rewards, she conducted interviews in a midwestern town with forty-two romance readers whom she met through Dorothy Evans, a chain bookstore employee who has earned a reputation as an expert on romantic fiction. Evans defends her customers' choice of entertainment; reading romances, she tells Radway, is no more harmful than watching sports on television. "We read books so we won't cry" is the poignant explanation one woman offers for her reading habit. Indeed, Radway found that while the women she studied devote themselves to nurturing their families, these wives and mothers receive insufficient devotion or nurturance in return. In romances the women find not only escape from the demanding and often tiresome routines of their lives but also a hero who supplies the tenderness and admiring attention that they have learned not to expect. The heroines admired by Radway's group defy the expected stereotypes; they are strong, independent, and intelligent. That such characters often find themselves to be victims of male aggression and almost always resign themselves to accepting conventional roles in life has less to do, Radway argues, with the women readers' fantasies and choices than with their need to deal with a fear of masculine dominance. These romance readers resent not only the limited choices in their own lives but the patronizing atitude that men especially express toward their reading tastes. In fact, women read romances both to protest and to escape temporarily the narrowly defined role prescribed for them by a patriarchal culture. Paradoxically, the books that they read make conventional roles for women seem desirable. It is this complex relationship between culture, text, and woman reader that Radway urges feminists to address. Romance readers, she argues, should be encouraged to deliver their protests in the arena of actual social relations rather than to act them out in the solitude of the imagination. In a new introduction, Janice Radway places the book within the context of current scholarship and offers both an explanation and critique of the study's limitations.
Follow the wind. . .Kiss of the night wind. . .Promise me forever. . . Award-winning author Janelle Taylor brings her magnificent historicals alive with fiery passion and exciting adventure. And Sweet Savage Heart continues that bestselling tradition on the wild plains of the Dakota Territory where an arrogant rancher stakes his claim on a flame-haired beauty! Sweet Savage Heart Kidnapped when she was a child, eighteen-year-old Rana Michaels couldn't imagine any life other than her carefree existence among the Sioux. The white man Travis Kincade appeared in her camp, and the flame-haired beauty's peace was shattered forever. His emerald eyes seemed to strip away her doeskin dress; his heated touch was destined to teach her passion's secrets. But when he traded a few trinkets for her freedom, Rana vowed to slay him before returning to her people. . .even if it meant denying herself the exquisite release only he could ignite within her!
The fire of their passion sparks as Steve and Ginny reunite in London. Their years apart have taken a toll, but nothing can change the fierce emotion that burns between the two. The lovers have made a pact to look beyond the hurts of yesterday and look toward their future -- their future as a family. But the dark treacheries of the past have called Steve back to Mexico to finally put an end to some unfinished business. Determined not to lose Steve again, Ginny travels with him into the heart of the land that holds both nightmarish memories of grave peril and those of the most bittersweet joy. As they fight to overcome forces that would try to separate them once and for all, Steve and Ginny must learn to find strength in one another and trust in the power of their love.

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