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The Tcl language and Tk graphical toolkit are simple and powerful building blocks for custom applications. The Tcl/Tk combination is increasingly popular because it lets you produce sophisticated graphical interfaces with a few easy commands, develop and change scripts quickly, and conveniently tie together existing utilities or programming libraries.One of the attractive features of Tcl/Tk is the wide variety of commands, many offering a wealth of options. Most of the things you'd like to do have been anticipated by the language's creator, John Ousterhout, or one of the developers of Tcl/Tk's many powerful extensions. Thus, you'll find that a command or option probably exists to provide just what you need.And that's why it's valuable to have a quick reference that briefly describes every command and option in the core Tcl/Tk distribution as well as the most popular extensions. Keep this book on your desk as you write scripts, and you'll be able to find almost instantly the particular option you need.Most chapters consist of alphabetical listings. Since Tk and mega-widget packages break down commands by widget, the chapters on these topics are organized by widget along with a section of core commands where appropriate. Contents include: Core Tcl and Tk commands and Tk widgets C interface (prototypes) Expect [incr Tcl] and [incr Tk] Tix TclX BLT Oratcl, SybTcl, and Tclodbc
A handy reference guide includes easy-to-understand summaries of the basic Tcl language elements, to the Tcl and Tk commands, and to the Tk widgets, in a quick access format. Original. (Advanced).
Modeling languages have been used by system developers for decades to specify, visualize, construct, and document systems; rough sketches using stick figures and arrows and scribbled routing conditions go back still further. But the Unified Modeling Language (UML), for the first time in the history of systems engineering, gives practitioners a common language that applies to a multitude of different systems, domains, and methods or processes. It does not guarantee project success, but enables you to communicate solutions in a consistent, standardized, and tool-supported language. All indications suggest that the industry is rushing to the UML. Created by leading software engineering experts Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh, and Ivar Jacobson (now of Rational Software Corporation), and accepted as a standard by the Object Management Group (OMG) in 1997, the language has already achieved more success than any previous contenders. With a firm conceptual and pragmatic basis, it is well suited to supporting projects in modern languages like C++ and Java. And standardization lays the groundwork for tools as well as standard methods or processes. This book presents the UML, including its extension mechanisms and the Object Constraint Language (OCL), in a clear reference format. For those new to the language, a tutorial quickly brings you to the point where you can use the UML. The book is concise and precise, breaking down the information along clean lines and explaining each element of the language. Introductory chapters also convey the purpose of the UML and show its value to projects and as a means for communication. Topics include: The role of the UML in projects The object-oriented paradigm and its relation to the UML Tutorial with realistic examples An integrated approach to UML diagrams Class and Object, Use Case, Sequence, Collaboration, Statechart, Activity, Component, and Deployment Diagrams Extension Mechanisms The Object Constraint Language (OCL)
Applying RCS and SCCS tells readers how to manage complex software development projects using RCS and SCCS. It covers the main features of RCS and SCCS, and includes an overview of CVS, SPMS, and other source and project management environments. Features quick references for RCS and SCCS, and implements notes for those who need to work with them quickly.
A guide to the failings of Windows 98 explains how to customize the system so as to avoid the inconvenience of software applications that overwrite file associations, repetitive warning screens, and unused icons crowding the desktop
Exim delivers electronic mail, both local and remote. It has all the virtues of a good postman: it's easy to talk to, reliable, efficient, and eager to accommodate even the most complex special requests. It's the default mail transport agent installed on some Linux systems, runs on many versions of Unix, and is suitable for any TCP/IP network with any combination of hosts and end-user mail software. Exim is growing in popularity because it is open source, scalable, and rich in features such as the following: Compatibility with the calling interfaces and options of Sendmail (for which Exim is usually a drop-in replacement) Lookups in LDAP servers, MySQL and PostgreSQL databases, and NIS or NIS+ services Support for many kinds of address parsing, including regular expressions that are compatible with Perl 5 Sophisticated error handling Innumerable tuning parameters for improving performance and handling enormous volumes of mail Best of all, Exim is easy to configure. You never have to deal with ruleset 3 or worry that a misplaced asterisk will cause an inadvertent mail bomb. While a basic configuration is easy to read and can be created quickly, Exim's syntax and behavior do get more subtle as you enter complicated areas like virtual hosting, filtering, and automatic replies. This book is a comprehensive survey that provides quick information for people in a hurry as well as thorough coverage of more advanced material.
One of Java's most striking claims is that it provides a secure programming environment. Yet despite endless discussion, few people understand precisely what Java's claims mean and how it backs up those claims. If you're a developer, network administrator or anyone else who must understand or work with Java's security mechanisms, Java Security is the in-depth exploration you need. Java Security, 2nd Edition, focuses on the basic platform features of Java that provide security--the class loader, the bytecode verifier, and the security manager--and recent additions to Java that enhance this security model: digital signatures, security providers, and the access controller. The book covers the security model of Java 2, Version 1.3, which is significantly different from that of Java 1.1. It has extensive coverage of the two new important security APIs: JAAS (Java Authentication and Authorization Service) and JSSE (Java Secure Sockets Extension). Java Security, 2nd Edition, will give you a clear understanding of the architecture of Java's security model and how to use that model in both programming and administration. The book is intended primarily for programmers who want to write secure Java applications. However, it is also an excellent resource for system and network administrators who are interested in Java security, particularly those who are interested in assessing the risk of using Java and need to understand how the security model works in order to assess whether or not Java meets their security needs.

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