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CO-PUBLISHED BY ROUTLEDGE AND THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF TEACHERS OF ENGLISH Bringing together arts-integrated approaches, literacy learning, and classroom-based research, this book explores ways upper elementary, middle, and high school teachers can engage their students physically, cognitively, and emotionally in deep reading of challenging texts. With a focus on teaching about the Holocaust and Anne Frank’s diary—part of the U.S. middle school literary canon—the authors present the concept of layering literacies as an essential means for conceptualizing how seeing the text, being the text, and feeling the text invite adolescents to learn about difficult and uncomfortable literature and subjects in relation to their contemporary lives. Offering a timely perspective on arts education advocacy, Chisholm and Whitmore demonstrate the vital need to teach through different modalities in order to strengthen students’ connections to literature, their schools, and communities. Accessible strategies are illustrated and resources are recommended for teachers to draw on as they design arts-based instruction for their students’ learning with challenging texts.
Identifies the elements of an effective reading lesson, and presents strategies teachers may use to help secondary students read and understand challenging fiction and nonfiction books.
Teaching Challenging Texts shows how to increase reading comprehension and enhance student engagement, even with the most challenging texts. Every chapter features ready-to-use, research-based lessons, replete with explicit instructions, handouts, Common Core correlations, and assessments.
Teaching the Canon in 21st Century Classrooms offers pedagogical applications and conceptualizations of canonical texts for 21st century students and classrooms through a variety of critical literacy perspectives.
Tough Talk, Tough Texts is a catalyst for reminding all of us who work with young people about the danger of throwing away the lifeblood of our students' interior worlds and our own dreams of changing the world for the better.... Tough Talk, Tough Texts insists that we offer students books that are not simply larger, bulkier Hallmark cards but that instead challenge them to consider difficult issues, pushing them to think deeply and grow. -Jimmy Santiago Baca Strategic reading, critical examination, and civil discourse aren't just for college preparedness-they are life skills. In Tough Talk, Tough Texts Cindy O'Donnell-Allen shares small-group instruction whose goal is to give kids the ability not merely to succeed academically, but to change their world. This isn't impractical idealism. Cindy shows step-by-step how to leverage challenging texts on challenging issues to maximize engagement and increase students' agency in reading and in life. Best of all, she shares all the know-how and nitty-gritty you'll need: scaffolds for whole-class and small-group discussions methods for grouping students, setting norms, and using response tools strategies that sustain independent discussions and document them multiple techniques for summative assessment reproducible resources such as handouts, assignment sheets, and scoring guides. Tough Talk, Tough Texts is about helping students grow as readers as they use texts to answer the big questions about themselves, their peers, and their world. "With careful preparation," writes Cindy O'Donnell-Allen, "students can learn to pose and discuss such questions, to listen and respond with empathy, and to implement strategies that will allow them to become more critical and strategic readers, writers, and thinkers."
This critical exploration of the theories and purposes of literacy challenges current assumptions about the discourse of schooling. Authors Margaret Anne Gallego and Sandra Hollingsworth, along with eminent scholars, delve into the lives and literacies that have traditionally been excluded from public classrooms and focus on the disenfranchisement that results from such politics. They propose an alternative set of literacies, helping non-mainstream students to learn the dominant language of power while preserving their community and personal identities. Through socio-political analyses, the contributors argue persuasively for expanding what "counts" as literacy to include visual media and technological literacy, multiple sign systems for special education students, community-based literacy and personal literacies. This practical and fresh collection is an essential resource for educators, theorists, and researchers who wish to expand the existing definitions of literacy to include multiple perspectives.
Takes on the challenge of helping students apply reading comprehension strategies in any subject. Shows how teachers can expand on their content expertise to provide instruction students need to understand specific technical and narrative texts. The book includes: examples of how teachers can model their reading process for students; ideas for supplementing and enhancing the use of required textbooks; detailed descriptions of specific strategies taught in context; stories from different high school classrooms to show how reading instruction varies according to content; samples of student work, including both struggling readers and college-bound seniors; a variety of 'comprehension constructors': guides designed to help students recognize and capture their thinking in writing while reading; guidance on assessing students; tips for balancing content and reading instruction.
Lesson planning in line with the new Primary National Curriculum! Why do we teach children to read? It is not merely to decode the words. We teach them to derive meaning from the text, to comprehend it. To not just read the lines, but to read between the lines and even read beyond the lines. So how can you make teaching comprehension in primary schools effective and engaging? How are you ensuring that children are finding meaning in what they read and how do we support more able readers to learn more? What does a good 'reading' lesson look like? This book demonstrates the effective teaching of reading through exemplar lessons. It discusses what makes them good lesson plans and how they can be adapted to suit different classes and different schools. In particular, this book helps you to meet the needs of more able readers particularly in years 5 and 6, outlining ways to challenge more able pupils to support them with the level 6 tests in Year 6. It helps you to cultivate your subject knowledge and invigorate your classroom teaching through focusing on what children need to learn and how to teach it. Did you know that this book is part of the Lessons in Teaching series? WHAT IS THE LESSONS IN TEACHING SERIES? Suitable for any teacher at any stage of their career, the books in this series are packed with great ideas for teaching engaging, outstanding lessons in your primary classroom. The Companion Website accompanying the series includes extra resources including tips, lesson starters, videos and Pinterest boards. Visit www.sagepub.co.uk/lessonsinteaching Books in this series: Lessons in Teaching Grammar in Primary Schools, Lessons in Teaching Computing in Primary Schools, Lessons in Teaching Number and Place Value in Primary Schools, Lessons in Teaching Reading Comprehension in Primary Schools, Lesson in Teaching Phonics in Primary Schools
Meet instructional challenges effectively and efficiently by uncovering hidden time for meeting individual students' needs. With small groups, you'll work closely with more children each day with her how-tos on using formative assessment to create groups from common needs; differentiating for individuals, even in a group; and enhancing Tier 1 and Tier 2 instruction.
Argues that the classics should be taught to all students, not just those in honors classes.
Robert McMahon has contributed something genuinely new to the teaching of classic and contemporary literature in high schoola system of teaching English that achieves classroom control through engagement and interest in content.
One of the greatest challenges for English language arts teachers today is the call to engage students in more complex texts. Tim Gillespie, who has taught in public schools for almost four decades, has found the lenses of literary criticism a powerful tool for helping students tackle challenging literary texts. Tim breaks down the dense language of critical theory into clear, lively, and thorough explanations of many schools of critical thought--reader response, biographical, historical, psychological, archetypal, genre based, moral, philosophical, feminist, political, formalist, and postmodern. "Doing Literary Criticism" gives each theory its own chapter with a brief, teacher-friendly overview and a history of the approach, along with an in-depth discussion of its benefits and limitations. Each chapter also includes ideas for classroom practices and activities. Using stories from his own English classes--from alternative programs to advanced placement and everything in between--Tim provides a wealth of specific classroom-tested suggestions for discussion, essay and research paper topics, recommended texts, exam questions, and more. The accompanying cd offers abbreviated overviews of each theory (designed to be used as classroom handouts), examples of student work, collections of quotes to stimulate discussion and writing, an extended history of women writers, and much more. Ultimately, "Doing Literary Criticism" offers teachers a rich set of materials and tools to help their students become more confident and able readers, writers, and critical thinkers. Chapters of this book include: (1) Getting Started; (2) Reader Response Criticism; (3) Biographical Criticism; (4) Historical Criticism; (5) Psychological Criticism; (6) Archetypal Criticism; (7) Genre Criticism; (8) Moral Criticism; (9) Philosophical Criticism; (10) Feminist Criticism; (11) Political or Advocacy Criticism; (12) Formalist Criticism; and (13) Putting It All Together. References and an index are also included. [Foreword by Leila Christenbury.].
This groundbreaking text offers a fresh perspective on how to implement children's literature into and across the curriculum in ways that are both effective and purposeful. Honed over years of experience and reflection in classroom settings and rich with real examples of teachers implementing critical pedagogy, it invites multiple ways of engaging with literature that extend beyond the genre and elements approach and also addresses potential problems or issues that teachers may confront. The book is structured around three 'mantras' that build on each other: Enjoy; Dig deeper; Take action. The practical strategies for taking a critical approach focus on issues that impact children's lives, building from students' personal experiences and cultural knowledge to using language to question the everyday world, analyze popular culture and media, understand how power relationships are socially constructed, and consider actions that can be taken to promote social justice. This book teems with pedagogical purpose. It is smart, principled, and useful. Its freshness and currency will resonate with readers and inspire their teaching. A Companion Website (www.routledge.com/cw/leland) enriches and extends the text.
It is often assumed that picturebooks are for very young readers because of their emphasis on the illustrations and their scarcity of text; however, there are increasing numbers of picturebooks where the age of the implied reader is questionable. These are picturebooks whose controversial subject matter and unconventional, often unsettling style of illustration challenge the reader, pushing them to question and probe deeper to understand what the book is about. In addition to the book challenging the reader, the reader often challenges the book in an attempt to understand what is being said. These increasingly popular picturebooks work on many different levels; they are truly polysemic and worthy of in-depth analysis. They push the reader to ask questions and in many instances are intrinsically philosophical, often dealing with fundamental life issues. Challenging and Controversial Picturebooks examines these unconventional, non-conformist picturebooks, considering what they are, their audience and their purpose. It also considers: Children’s and adults’ thoughts on these kinds of picturebooks. How challenging and unsettling wordless picturebooks can play with the mind and promote philosophical thought. What creates non-conformity and strangeness ... is it the illustrations and their style, the subject matter or a combination of both? Why certain countries create, promote and accept these picturebooks more than others. Why certain picturebooks are censored and what factors are in play when these decisions are made. The role of publishers in translating and publishing these picturebooks. Children’s creative and critical responses to strange, unsettling and often disturbing visual texts. This inspiring and thought-provoking volume explores the work of a number of highly respected, international picturebook experts and includes an exclusive interview with the legendary Klaus Flugge, Managing Director of Andersen Press, one of the few remaining independent children’s book publishers in England. It is an indispensable reference for all interested in or working with picturebooks, including researchers, students in higher and teacher education, English advisors/inspectors, literacy consultants and classroom teachers.
This book is unique in that it goes beyond individual teacher assistance to provide creative systems that work in concert with a student's literacy education. This easy-to-use reference guide provides K-8 teachers with practical strategies to motivate all students to develop their reading abilities across grade levels and content areas. Focus on what early-literacy instruction and intervention struggling students should receive and what tips parents should know to help struggling readers. With instructional practices that can be adapted for a wide range of academic interventions, this book shows educators where to start in building an action plan for student literacy achievement. It is an ideal professional development resource for team study and discussion. Benefits Gain insight into the early signs of reading struggles. Examine relevant theory and research related to literacy, including the fundamental elements of reading that need to work in balance in literacy instruction. Review questioning strategies to help students broaden their understanding when reading challenging texts. Explore graphic organizers that can engage higher-level thinking skills. Survey a toolbox of instructional practices for supporting literacy in inclusive classrooms. Study a blueprint for success for literacy programs. Contents Introduction The Struggling Reader Key Elements of Balanced Literacy Programs Effective Early Literacy Intervention Vocabulary Strategies--Helping Students Become Word Wise Graphic Organizers--Making Thinking Visible Content Strategies--Navigating Informational Text Questioning Techniques--Fostering Higher-Level Thinking Developing an Action Plan for Success Appendix: Teacher's Toolbox References and Resources Index
"Teaching Comprehension: The Comprehension Process Approach" is unparalleled to any other text in its coverage of how to teach comprehension to students of all ages. Renowned scholar Cathy Collins Block takes on the challenging task of providing what every student needs to know about teaching comprehension, in a concise manner. This text is packed with innovative lessons and approaches based on the latest developments in research-based practices. Designed to suit one's needs, each chapter ends with a complete lesson plan that can be implemented in classrooms with a wide range of student reading ability levels. Features Presents the "Thinking Process Approach" to comprehension instruction through highly effective, research-based lessons. Provides in-depth treatment of literal comprehension processes, inference, imagery, metacognition, and non-fictional texts. The text teaches higher-level comprehension processes based on what students need to fully understand more than ten distinct genres (Chs. 5-12). Addresses the comprehension needs of "Generation Y" students, the roles and responsibilities of teachers and students; and curriculum and instructional activities, featuring specific actions that teachers can take to capture the attention of a new generation of students. Describes new methods of empowering students throughout the text, which advance their own comprehension abilities. An entire chapter is dedicated to new assessment tools that diagnose and prescribe student's comprehension needs and accomplishments (Ch. 10). These assessment tools have been successfully tested in more than 2,000 classrooms throughout the United States and Canada. Heavy emphasis throughout the text on how to use technology to improve comprehension instruction to meet the needs of the 21st century classroom. Rather than merely listing Web site addresses, the text integrates discussion of strategies for using technology into the text. Includes selections of current, children's and adolescent literature as well as many examples of non-fiction selections covering grades K-12. Covers comprehension needs at each stage of students' intellectual development. Contains vivid graphics that thematically recur within chapters and easily guide students' reading throughout the text and demonstrate how to use graphics effectively to teach comprehension.
"The experiences provided in these 37 lessons parallel the readings and tasks recommended by the Common Core State Standards. The main difference is that our lessons put student curiosity and engagement first." -Harvey "Smokey" Daniels and Nancy Steineke In this highly anticipated follow-up to Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Reading, Harvey "Smokey" Daniels and Nancy Steineke share their powerful strategies for engaging students in challenging, meaningful reading of fiction and poetry using some of their favorite short, fresh texts-or, as they put it, "full-strength adult literature that gives us English majors a run for our interpretive money- but is still intriguing enough to keep teen readers digging and thinking." Use the 37 innovative, step-by-step, common-core-correlated lessons with the reproducible texts provided, with selections from your literature textbook, or with your own best-loved texts to teach close reading skills and deep comprehension strategies. Give students opportunities to read and synthesize across texts with the 8 thematic text set lessons provided, or use the model unit outlines for using the lessons with The Giver, To Kill a Mockingbird, and The Great Gatsby as springboards for planning your own novel studies. Better Together! Used together, Texts and Lessons for Teaching Literature and Texts and Lessons for Content-Area Reading give you all the lesson ideas you need for all text types. Save 15% when you buy them together in a Texts and Lessons Bundle.
Karen Feathers explains why infotexts often present problems, even for proficient readers.
Teaching is a tough and challenging job and society demands more from its teachers than ever before. This new edition is an essential companion for those training to teach, providing an overview of important professional issues that all future teachers need to engage with in order to succeed in the classroom. Aiming to give you the confident start you need in the classroom, this third edition is equally valuable to those training to teach in both primary and secondary education, and includes: • New chapters on: inclusion; school-based training; creativity; and digital technologies • Increased coverage of behaviour management • A new feature outlining the relevant Teachers’ Standards at the start of each chapter The accompanying website https://study.sagepub.com/denby3e, has been updated to include additional material expanding on and complementing the contents of the book. This book is essential reading for professional studies modules on both primary and secondary initial teacher education courses at both undergraduate and postgraduate level, and on university-based and school-based training courses. Neil Denby is recently retired from the School of Education and Professional Development, University of Huddersfield and now works as an independent educational consultant.

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