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This accessible book will help elementary school teachers improve literacy instruction inside or outside the Common Core environment. The authors address teachers’ instructional needs by introducing key concepts from current trends in literacy education—from high-level standards to the use of 21st-century literacies. Readers then follow teachers as they successfully implement the curriculum they developed to promote high-level thinking and engagement with disciplinary content. The text focuses on three disciplinary literacy units of instruction: a science unit in a 2nd-grade classroom, a social studies (history) unit in a 4th-grade classroom, and a mathematics unit in a 6th-grade classroom. Each unit revolves around a central inquiry question and includes research-based strategies for using reading, writing, and classroom talk as tools to foster disciplinary understandings. This unique, insider’s look at how real teachers build and implement a Common Core–aligned curriculum will be an invaluable resource for teachers, schools, and districts as they move forward to align their own curricula. “I can’t imagine a more timely book . . . a set of elegant principles and some stunning examples of how teachers can use reading, writing, and talk to enhance learning in the science, social studies, and mathematics classroom.” —P. David Pearson, professor of language and literacy and human development, Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley “If you’re wondering how to integrate literacy across the content disciplines, this is the text you will want to keep and return to often.” —Diane Lapp, distinguished professor of education, San Diego State University “Inspiring, and better still, infectious!” —Donald R. Bear, Iowa State University “Provides concrete ideas for teaching students to use literacy to think like scientists, historians, and mathematicians.” —Douglas Fisher, professor of educational leadership, San Diego State University, and teacher leader, Health Sciences High and Middle College
In this practical guide, literacy experts show teachers how to use project-based inquiry to build students’ discipline-specific skills and knowledge in grades 6–12. The authors present a five-phase framework that incorporates their professional development experience working with over 3,000 teachers. By making the intuitive practices of the disciplines explicit within an inquiry process, students have opportunities to construct new knowledge by employing practices used by literary critics, scientists, historians, and mathematicians. Read, Write, Inquire responds to the current focus on disciplinary literacy across multiple sets of standards, offering a clear blueprint to help teachers meet these standards while also providing students with deep learning across the curriculum. “This unique approach encourages students to adopt sophisticated literacy practices in the same way the disciplines developed them—as a natural outgrowth of knowledge creation.” —Timothy Shanahan, distinguished professor emeritus, University of Illinois at Chicago
This practical resource will help K–5 teachers incorporate digitally supported disciplinary literacy practices into their classroom instruction. With an emphasis on reaching all learners, the authors present Planning for Elementary Digitally-supported Disciplinary Literacy (PEDDL)—a six-phase framework that introduces readers to an approach for integrating disciplinary literacy into instruction using various types of digital tools to support literacy learning. Including instructional methods and lesson plans, the text demonstrates how the tools can be incorporated into the English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies classroom. Included are core practices for disciplinary literacy learning, along with the rationale behind each, and examples of the PEDDL Framework in action. Book Features: A structured framework and lesson planning template to guide teachers in planning for digitally supported disciplinary literacy. Guidance for using the framework in the everyday curriculum, including eight completed lesson plans, two for each focus discipline. A variety of classroom activities, such as reading across texts, making real-world connections, text analysis, and using disciplinary vocabulary. Digital methods and examples for reaching and supporting all learners, including readers and writers who may struggle. Connections to national standards in English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies.
Investigating Disciplinary Literacy presents a framework for conducting professional learning cycles focused on disciplinary literacy, based on professional development and research projects that the authors have conducted with a range of districts over the past 5 years. In addition to outlining the steps of the cycle, the authors identify four "working habits" essential to initiating and sustaining DL projects: balancing content with process; creating a culture of adaptation and invention; attending equally to intermediate and DL skills; and positioning teachers and leaders as learners within projects. Written in a reader-friendly voice for a practitioner audience, the book provides practical, research-based guidance for those seeking to collaboratively explore and implement DL-related practices in context-specific, meaningful ways--Provided by publisher.
Comprehensive, timely, and relevant, this text offers an approach to discipline-specific literacy instruction that is aligned with the Common Core State Standards and the needs of teachers, students, and secondary schools across the nation. It is essential that teachers know how to provide instruction that both develops content and literacy knowledge and skills, and aims at reducing student achievement gaps. Building on the research-supported premise that discipline-specific reading instruction is key to achieving these goals, this text provides practical guidance and strategies for prospective and practicing content area teachers (and other educators) on how to prepare all students to succeed in college and the workforce. Pedagogical features in each chapter engage readers in digging deeper and in applying the ideas and strategies presented in their own contexts: Classroom Life (real 6-12 classroom scenarios and interviews with content-area teachers) Common Core State Standards Connections College, Career, and Workforce Connections Applying Discipline-Specific Literacies Think Like an Expert ("habits of thinking and learning" specific to each discipline) Digital Literacies Differentiating Instruction Reflect and Apply Questions Extending Learning Activities The Companion Website includes: Lesson plan resources Annotated links to video files Annotated links to additional resources and information Glossary/Flashcards For Instructors: All images and figures used in the text provided in an easily downloadable format For Instructors: PowerPoint lecture slides
Engage your students in scientific thinking across disciplines! Did you know that scientists spend more than half of their time reading and writing? Students who are science literate can analyze, present, and defend data – both orally and in writing. The updated edition of this bestseller offers strategies to link the new science standards with literacy expectations, and specific ideas you can put to work right away. Features include: A discussion of how to use science to develop essential 21st century skills Instructional routines that help students become better writers Useful strategies for using complex scientific texts in the classroom Tools to monitor student progress through formative assessment Tips for high-stakes test preparation
Being literate in an academic discipline means more than simply being able to read and comprehend text; it means you can think, speak, and write as a historian, scientist, mathematician, or artist. Doug Buehl strips away the one-size-fits-all approach to content area literacy and presents a much-needed instructional model for disciplinary literacy, showing how to mentor middle and high school learners to become "academic insiders" who are college and career ready. This thoroughly revised second edition of Developing Readers in the Academic Disciplines shows how to help students adjust their thinking to comprehend a range of complex texts that fall outside their reading comfort zones. This book --a natural companion to Buehl's Classroom Strategies for Interactive Learning, which has been bolstering student comprehension for almost three decades--provides the following supports for teachers: Instructional tools that adapt generic literacy practices to discipline-specific variations Strategies for frontloading instruction to activate and build background knowledge New approaches for encouraging inquiry around disciplinary texts In-depth exploration of the role of argumentation in informational text Numerous examples from science, mathematics, history and social studies, English/language arts, and related arts to show you what vibrant learning looks like in various classroom settings Developing Readers in the Academic Disciplines introduces teachers from all disciplines to new kinds of thinking and, ultimately, teaching that helps students achieve new levels of understanding.
You wouldn’t tell a heart surgeon to also do pediatrics—so why would we tell content area educators they must “do” literacy? Math, history, English and science teachers are passionate about their specialties, and that’s why authors Releah Lent and Marsha Voight designed a framework that keeps teachers’ subjects at the center of daily classroom life while also helping them pool strengths with colleagues. Based on years of successful implementation, this powerful PL cycle “drops in” seamlessly to any school setting, so teachers schoolwide take on innovative practices of reading, writing, thinking, and doing within their areas of expertise.
What do you get when a high school English teacher, a middle school literacy coach, and an elementary school teacher realize that the old adage of "every teacher is a teacher of reading" misses the bigger picture? Jacy Ippolito, Christina Dobbs, and Megin Charner-Laird have spent the last decade trying to answer that question, working with teachers across grade levels, conducting studies and analyzing research in order to build a more comprehensive instructional strategy that engages with any group of students in every content area. The answer they came to is disciplinary literacy. Combined with the RAND model for reading comprehension and the Inquiry Cycle, Ippolito, Dobbs, and Charner-Laird have produced a framework for teaching and learning that develops the skills all students need to succeed outside of school. Disciplinary Literacy doesn't ask for all teachers to be general reading teachers; it asks for all educators to empower students to adopt and eventually adapt the language, genres, and modalities prized by each discipline"¬‚¬"to give students the tools to take on professional identities. This book provides research-based frameworks, guiding questions and examples, and lots of stories from teachers who have already walked the path of Disciplinary Literacy Inquiry and Instruction"¬‚¬"it's for educators who want to take ownership of their own learning alongside like-minded colleagues, and raise the achievement of all their students.
Think you understand Disciplinary Literacy? Think again. In this important reference, content teachers and other educators explore why students need to understand how historians, novelists, mathematicians, and scientists use literacy in their respective fields. ReLeah shows how to teach students to: Evaluate and question evidence (Science) Compare sources and interpret events (History) Favor accuracy over elaboration (Math) Attune to voice and fi gurative language (ELA)
Today's standards challenge middle and high school teachers to teach their content deeply and meaningfully. This book provides an innovative coaching model for helping science, social studies, and English language arts teachers promote the reading, writing, listening, speaking, and thinking skills needed for high-level work in each discipline. Seventeen specific strategies are presented for large-group, small-group, and individual coaching, including step-by-step instructions and implementation tips. Profiles of highly effective disciplinary literacy coaches illustrate the nuts and bolts of the job and highlight ways to deal with common challenges. In a large-size format for easy photocopying, the book includes 21 reproducible forms. Purchasers get access to a Web page where they can download and print the reproducible materials.
"From leading authorities in both adolescent literacy and content-area teaching, this book addresses the particular challenges of literacy learning in each of the major academic disciplines. Chapters focus on how to help students successfully engage withtexts and ideas in English/literature, science, math, history, and arts classrooms. The book shows that while general strategies for reading informational texts are essential, they are not enough--students also need to learn processing strategies that are quite specific to each subject and its typical tasks or problems. Vignettes from exemplary classrooms illustrate research-based ways to build content-area knowledge while targeting essential reading and writing skills"-- Provided by publisher.
This guide will help pre- and inservice secondary teachers and their instructors to use videos as a resource to improve teaching. The book focuses on five disciplinary literacy strategies to help teachers develop high-leverage teaching practices across a range of subject areas. The text includes sample lessons, protocols, and transcripts from video discussion groups.
Well established as a clear, comprehensive course text in five prior editions, this book has now been extensively revised, with a focus on disciplinary literacy. It offers a research-based framework for helping students in grades 6-12 learn to read, write, and communicate academic content and to develop the unique literacy, language, and problem-solving skills required by the different disciplines. In an engaging, conversational style, William G. Brozo presents effective instruction and assessment practices, illustrated with extended case studies and sample forms. Special attention is given to adaptations to support diverse populations, including English language learners. (Prior edition title: Content Literacy for Today's Adolescents, Fifth Edition.) New to This Edition: *Shift in focus to disciplinary literacy as well as general content-area learning. *Chapter on culturally and linguistically diverse learners. *Incorporates a decade of research and the goals of the Common Core State Standards. *Increased attention to academic vocabulary, English language learners, the use of technology, and multiple text sources, such as graphic novels and digital texts. *Pedagogical features: chapter-opening questions plus new case studies, classroom dialogues, practical examples, sample forms, and more.
Written from a critical perspective, this volume provides teachers, teacher educators, and classroom researchers with a conceptual framework and practical methods for teaching and researching the disciplinary literacy development of English language learners (ELLs). Grounded in a nuanced critique of current social, economic, and political changes shaping public education, Gebhard offers a comprehensive framework for designing curriculum, instruction, and assessments that build on students’ linguistic and cultural resources and that are aligned with high-stakes state and national standards using the tools of systemic functional linguistics (SFL). By providing concrete examples of how teachers have used SFL in their work with students in urban schools, this book provides pre-service and in-service teachers, as well as literacy researchers and policy makers, with new insights into how they can support the disciplinary literacy development of ELLs and the professional practices of their teachers in the context of current school reforms. Key features of this book include the voices of teachers, examples of curriculum, sample analyses of student writing, and guiding questions to support readers in conducting action-oriented research in the schools where they work.
As students move into secondary school the language demands in the specialised subject areas become increasingly more abstract and complex. New Zealand curriculum statements have recognised the role of every teacher in enhancing their students’ literacy and the importance of integrating subject-specific literacy (SSL) into content-area classrooms at secondary school (Ministry of Education,(MOE), 2007). International research suggests that a disciplinary literacy (DL) approach that integrates content and language learning can help students develop these advanced literacy skills that are required in specialised secondary school subjects. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which a small group of New Zealand teachers have integrated a DL approach into their classroom practice and to identify factors that have enabled or limited them in taking a DL approach in their teaching. The research study used a qualitative research design and data were collected through eleven one-to-one semi-structured, responsive interviews with six New Zealand secondary school teachers who had been identified as having an interest in literacy. The data were analysed using Braun and Clarke’s (2006, 2012) six-phase thematic analysis process. A “disciplinary literacy lens” framework was synthesised from the literature to provide a guide to examine and analyse the data relating to classroom literacy practices. Five major themes were identified from the data in response to the research questions. A major finding from the study was that although none of the teachers were familiar with the term “disciplinary literacy”, all of them had incorporated into their teaching some practices that aligned with a DL approach. However, the focus for most of the participants was on teaching subject-specific vocabulary, reading subject texts and writing to show understanding of subject concepts with the primary purpose of ensuring that content was covered for assessment. The two teachers who had a more holistic DL approach to their teaching had undertaken their own ongoing personal professional development. The findings suggest that given a guiding DL framework such as the one developed for this research, in a professional development context, teachers could become even more ‘disciplinary’ in their approach to classroom literacy teaching.
"As elegantly practical as it is theoretically elegant. It is a guided tour, as one examines the tools of expert teachers as they engage students in a journey that is aptly dubbed Reading Apprenticeship?learning how to become a savvy, strategic reader under the tutelage of thoughtful, caring, and demanding teachers.? P. David Pearson, University of California, Berkeley, and founding editor of the Handbook of Reading Research. Reading for Understanding is a monumental achievement. It was a monumental achievement when it came out as a first edition in 1999, bringing years of rigorous reading research together in a framework for teaching that made sense in actual secondary school classrooms. Now, just thirteen years later, Schoenbach and Greenleaf have several randomized clinical trials and multiple on-going studies at their fingertips to demonstrate the effects of this approach for developing the reading and thinking of young people in our nation?s middle and high school classrooms, as well as in community college classrooms. Their careful work on developing disciplinary literacy among all students represents a passion for and commitment to supporting students?and their teachers?in reading for understanding, which translates to reading for enjoyment, self-awareness, learning, and for purposeful and informed action in our society. ?Elizabeth Moje, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and Associate Dean for Research, School of Education, University of Michigan Reading Apprenticeship has proven to be an inspiration to Renton Technical College faculty and students alike. They have learned together to view themselves as readers in transformative ways, as they embrace powerful techniques to increase reading comprehension. The ideas and strategies in Reading for Understanding anchor this new and broad-based energy around reading and an enthusiasm among our faculty to model effective reading strategies for our students. ?Steve Hanson, President, Renton Technical College, Renton, Washington Reading for Understanding has the finest blend I have seen of research, strategies, and classroom vignettes to deepen teacher learning and help them connect the dots between theory and practice. ?Curtis Refior, Content Area Literacy Coach, Fowlerville Community Schools, Fowlerville, Michigan A teacher-tested, research-based resource for dramatically improving reading skills Published in partnership with WestEd, this significantly updated second edition of the bestselling book contains strategies for helping students in middle school through community college gain the reading independence to master subject area textbooks and other material. Based on the Reading Apprenticeship program, which three rigorous "gold standard" research studies have shown to be effective in raising students' reading achievement Presents a clear framework for improving the reading and subject area learning of all students, including English learners, students with special needs, as well as those in honors and AP courses Provides concrete tools for classroom use and examples from a range of classrooms Presents a clear how-to for teachers implementing the subject area literacies of the Common Core Standards Reading for Understanding proves it's never too late for teachers and students to work together to boost literacy, engagement, and achievement.
ABSTRACT: This study investigated how a high school literacy coach provided coaching to support teachers' understanding and implementation of disciplinary literacy instruction. With a focus on collaborations between the literacy coach and teachers in the disciplines of social studies, math, and English, this article presents three case studies that illustrate how the coach and teachers designed instruction within and beyond the district's curricular frameworks. Findings suggest when the coach situated herself as a collaborator, rather than an expert, and positioned the teacher as the disciplinary expert, the coach and teacher were able to foreground the discipline and plan meaningful disciplinary literacy instruction. The use of open-ended questions, think-alouds, and an examination of instructional tasks from students' perspectives enabled the teachers to strengthen their disciplinary literacy instruction.
To develop strong disciplinary literacy skills, middle and high school students need to engage with diverse types of challenging texts in every content area. This book provides a blueprint for constructing literacy-rich instructional units in English language arts, science, and social studies. The authors describe how to design interconnected text sets and plan lessons that support learning and engagement before, during, and after reading. Presented are ways to build academic vocabulary and background knowledge, teach research-based comprehension strategies, and guide effective discussions and text-based writing activities. Chapters also cover how to teach students to write argumentative, informative, and narrative essays, and to conduct discipline-specific inquiry. Special features include sample text sets and 24 reproducible planning templates and other teaching tools; purchasers get access to a Web page where they can download and print the reproducible materials in a convenient 8 1/2" x 11" size.
Literacy and popular culture are intrinsically linked as forms of communication, entertainment, and education. Students are motivated to engage with popular culture through a myriad of mediums for a variety of purposes. Utilizing popular culture to bridge literacy concepts across content areas in K-12 settings offers a level playing field across student groups and grade levels. As concepts around traditional literacy education evolve and become more culturally responsive, the connections between popular culture and disciplinary literacy must be explored. Disciplinary Literacy Connections to Popular Culture in K-12 Settings is an essential publication that explores a conceptual framework around pedagogical connections to popular culture. While highlighting a broad range of topics including academic creativity, interdisciplinary storytelling, and skill development, this book is ideally designed for educators, curriculum developers, instructional designers, administrative officials, policymakers, researchers, academicians, and students.

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