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Includes CD-Rom 'The book provides interesting and accessible information on the theory and development of Identiplay, with case studies on the accompanying CD-Rom adding further detail' - British Journal of Special Education 'This book provides parents and professionals with the answer to a simple question - How might I make a start on play? Identiplay is a launch pad to some of the best work I have seen in the area of play for children with autism' - Caroline Smith, Principal Educational Psychologist and International Trainer Children on the autistic spectrum and those with specific communication disorders often demonstrate a difficulty in learning to play and a resulting isolation from their peers. The Identiplay intervention, based on the work of Beyer and Gammeltoft, promotes the development of social skills and social understanding, imagination, exploration, flexibility and change. By learning these skills the young person can enjoy reciprocal play with an adult or peer. In this book the authors explain how to use this positive and practical intervention and provide three video clips with case histories and a PowerPoint presentation to facilitate professional training. A CD-ROM is included containing the photographs of Identiplay kits, play scripts, video clips to allow printing of all the materials. There is also advice on ways of adapting Identiplay to further extend play skills, moving away from the original format of a table-top activity, and applying the principles in a wider range of activities, such as role play, the development of leisure activities, water play and outdoor games. The theoretical basis for the programme is also explained, drawing on the authors' analysis of the function and development of play in children not on the autistic spectrum. The programme is suitable for all practitioners in educational and care settings who work with young children on the autistic spectrum or with communication difficulties, and is also appropriate for parents looking for an effective and enjoyable intervention to use with their own children.
This book discusses the deficits in the development and presentation of play behavior and social skills that are considered central characteristics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The book explains why play provides an important context for social interactions and how its absence can further exacerbate social deficits over time. It highlights the critical roles of social skills in development, and the social, cognitive, communication, and motor components of play. Chapters offer conceptually and empirically sound play and social skills interventions for children with ASD. Play activities using diverse materials and including interactions with peers and parents are designed to promote positive, effective social behaviors and encourage continued development. The book provides unique strategies that can be tailored to fit individual children’s strengths and deficits. Topics featured in this book include: Naturalistic Teaching Strategies (NaTS) for developing play and social skills. Teaching play and social skills with video modeling. Peer-mediated intervention (PMI) strategies that promote positive social interactions between children with ASD and their peers. Visual Activity Schedules and Scripts. Parent-implemented play and social skills intervention. Play and Social Skills for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder is a must-have resource for researchers, clinicians, and graduate students in clinical child and school psychology, behavioral therapy/rehabilitation, social work, public health, and related psychology, education, and behavioral health fields.
Learning through play is a well-established principle that underpins much educational practice, yet it is often overlooked in association with children with autistic spectrum disorders. This book considers the wide-ranging benefits of developing play and taking it into drama with these children. The authors demonstrate how to implement such approaches via a highly practical, structured developmental framework, within which participants may gradually learn to be creative. They also discuss the psychology and pedagogy of autism in relation to play and drama and connect them to everyday learning situations using a wealth of examples. This accessible approach to play and drama can offer a powerful, memorable, integrating way forward for children with autistic spectrum disorders - and enjoyable, fun opportunities for teaching and learning.
Teaching Autistic Children through Play Skills
This wide-ranging, well-illustrated book offers all kinds of tried and tested strategies to help young people with autistic spectrum disorders develop and learn. Designed to be a really practical guide for nursery nurses, teachers and support staff in mainstream schools, as well as parents, the guide focuses on both work and play. 'Every parent, teacher or teaching assistant who supports a child with autistic tendencies should have a copy of this book.' Fiona Jukes, Learning Support Assistant This wide-ranging, well-illustrated book offers all kinds of tried and tested strategies to help young people with autistic spectrum disorders develop and learn. Designed to be a really practical guide for nursery nurses, teachers and support staff in mainstream schools, as well as parents, the guide focuses on both work and play and includes helpful guidance on numeracy and literacy.
Preschool can be overwhelming for a child with autism. Autism affects how a child communicates, behaves, and relates to others. What do you do when a three-year-old with autism falls on the floor kicking and screaming? How do you communicate with a child who looks away and flaps his hands? What do you do with a four-year-old who watches the ceiling fan as it rotates around and around? Who can help if you suspect a child in your class has autism? Childcare providers need to know what they can do to help children with autism reach their full potential. Teaching Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder discusses autism in a straightforward way. It describes the major types of autism in ways that are very easy to understand. The first two chapters discuss the major characteristics associated with autism, decipher the jargon related to this disability, and help teachers understand the ways children with autism relate to the world. Other chapters focus on setting up a proactive preschool environment, helping children learn life skills, managing behavior, helping them communicate, encouraging children with autism to play, helping them to get along with others, and working with families. Each chapter contains specific strategies for the teacher to use in the classroom. Teaching Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder will help teachers connect with all children in meaningful ways and encourage children with autism to learn and grow.
This book describes teaching strategies and instructional adaptations which promote communication and socialization in children with autism. It offers specific strategies that capitalize on the individual strengths and learning styles of the autistic child.
This two book/DVD package presents a parent training approach that is accessible, evidence based, and highly practical. Grounded in developmental and behavioral research, the Practitioner's Guide provides step-by-step guidelines for conducting parent training individually or in groups. It takes proven techniques for promoting the social-communication skills of young children with autism (up to age 6) and breaks them into simple yet effective steps for parents to follow. The DVD, for use in the training sessions, features video clips of parents implementing the techniques with their children, as well as PowerPoint slides. The Practitioners Guide also features 30 reproducible handouts and forms. The companion Manual for Parents helps parents master the techniques and use them at home with their child during daily routines and activities. - Publisher.
This book examines early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI) programs for young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It analyzes current research on early intervention (EI) and explains the importance of accurate, timely detection of ASD in facilitating the use of EI. Chapters address five widely researched EIBI approaches: Discrete Trial Training, Pivotal Response Training, the Early Start Denver Model, Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching, and Enhanced Milieu Teaching. This in-depth study of current EIBI approaches offers a rigorous guide to earlier and more intensive interventions for children with ASD, leading to greater autonomy and improved later life outcomes for individuals. Featured topics include: Parent-implemented interventions and related issues. Evaluations of controversial interventions used with children with ASD. Factors contributing to rising ASD prevalence. Obstacles to obtaining accurate ASD diagnosis in young children. Early Intervention for Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder is an essential resource for researchers, clinicians, and graduate students in developmental, clinical child, and school psychology, behavioral therapy/rehabilitation, social work, public health, educational policy and politics, and related psychology and behavioral health fields.
A collection of essays on teaching autistic children, covering such topics as language use, social-communicative skills, and parenting stress
This is a straightforward, easy-to-understand guide to working with autistic children. It explains the major characteristics associated with autism and helps teachers and parents understand how these children relate to the world.
This manual is a user-friendly, comprehensive description of the Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD) model of autism treatment—the latest scientific information on what truly works in treating autism in an integrated, organized, consumable format. The book details effective early behavioral intervention, covering topics such as challenging behavior, visual modification, parental involvement, improving language, cognition, and social skills, and ends with a section that explains how all of the treatments can be put together in real-life service provision organizations. The CARD model is highly comprehensive and provides useful clinical information to form cutting-edge treatment programs. Describes in detail the world-renowned, state-of-the-art CARD model of treatment for children with autism spectrum disorders Provides practitioners critical guidance in how to combine the best components into comprehensive treatment programs for individuals with autism that are not only backed by research, but also the most effective, and the least intrusive Includes practical information, presented in a user-friendly, professionally-oriented format, with tables, figures, and flowcharts to help guide real-life clinical decision making
Bryna Siegel gives parents of autistic children what they need most: hope. Her first book, The World of the Autistic Child, became an instant classic, illuminating the inaccessible minds of afflicted children. Now she offers an equally insightful, thoroughly practical guide to treating the learning disabilities associated with this heartbreaking disorder. The trouble with treating autism, Siegel writes, is that it is a spectrum disorder--a combination of a number of symptoms and causes. To one extent or another, it robs the child of social bonds, language, and intimacy--but the extent varies dramatically in each case. The key is to understand each case of autism as a discrete set of learning disabilities, each of which must be treated individually. Siegel explains how to take an inventory of a child's particular disabilities, breaks down the various kinds unique to autism, discusses our current knowledge about each, and reviews the existing strategies for treating them. There is no simple cure for this multifarious disorder, she writes; instead, an individual program, with a unique array of specific treatments, must be constructed for each child. She gives practical guidance for fashioning such a program, empowering parents to take the lead in their child's treatment. At the same time, she cautions against the proliferating, but questionable, treatments hawked to afflicted families. She knows the panic to do something, anything, to help an autistic child, and she offers parents reassurance and support as well as sensible advice, combining knowledge from experience, theory and research. For parents, autism in a child is heartbreaking. But it need not be overwhelming. Bryna Siegel offers a new understanding, and a practical, thoughtful approach that will give parents new hope.
This now classic text remains a cornerstone of continuing efforts to develop inclusive peer play programs for children on the autism spectrum. The second edition has been thoroughly revised to reflect major new developments in the field of autism. Notable additions include an updated description of the Integrated Play Groups (IPG) model and related research; an examination of the nature of autism and of play from past to present, with major updates on incidence, diagnosis, and characteristics; and a comprehensive review of play interventions. Presenting vivid descriptions of three children with autism over a 10-year period (from age 5 to age 16), Play and Imagination in Children with Autism: Traces the development of the children as they overcome obstacles to enter into the play culture of their peers.Focuses on two critical years during which the children participated in a peer play group.Documents the emergence of remarkable transformations in the children’s social relations with peers and symbolic activity.Includes vignettes, dialogue, and samples of writing and drawing to bring the children’s stories to life.Lays out the implications for new directions in research and practice. Pamela J. Wolfberg is Associate Professor of special education and Director of the autism spectrum graduate program (Project Mosaic) at San Francisco State University. “Play and Imagination in Children with Autism has been the cornerstone of my professional and personal life for nearly a decade. This updated edition retains the original accessible style, explaining so clearly the pivotal role that peer play holds in the lives of individuals on the autism spectrum, while providing readers with cutting-edge developments in theory, research, and practice in the field.” —Heather McCracken, Founder/Executive Director, Friend 2 Friend Social Learning Society “Dr. Wolfberg continues to break new ground with the second edition of her book. What a pleasure for any child to get involved in one of her integrated play groups, and what a relief for parents to know that their child is both learning and having fun! This is a wonderful resource for professionals interested in creating engaging and effective social skills groups for children on the autism spectrum.” —Connie Kasari, UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies “Children with autism benefit in so many ways from social play experiences, despite the significant challenges in symbolic development. Dr. Pamela Wolfberg, a leading expert in this crucial aspect of children's development, once again guides us in a highly engaging manner in supporting social and play development for children with ASD.” —Barry M. Prizant, Director, Childhood Communication Services, Brown University “This book is a ‘must’ for anyone who wants to bring about genuine social reciprocity and imagination in children with autistic spectrum disorders. Pamela Wolfberg takes us on a journey through previously uncharted territory, documenting in rich qualitative detail how to scaffold entry into the culture of peer play.” —Adriana L. Schuler, San Francisco State University “Dr. Wolfberg has done a fine and sensitive job in characterizing the pivotal role that play skills hold in the social and linguistic world of the child with autism. Her development of Integrated Peer Play Groups, and the delineation of the autistic child as the ‘Novice Player’ and the typical child as the ‘Expert Player,’ is a very valuable heuristic tool to all who work with children with autism.” —Bryna Siegel, Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute, University of California, San Francisco
Play-Based Interventions for Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders explores the most recognized, researched, and practical methods for using play therapy with the increasing number of children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs), and shows clincians how to integrate these methods into their practices. Using a diverse array of play-based approaches, the book brings together the voices of researchers and practicing clinicians who are successfully utilizing play and play-based interventions with children and adolescents on the autism spectrum. It also examines the neurobiological underpinnings of play in children on the autism spectrum and the overall effect of play on neuro-typical and neuro-atypical development. Finally, through careful integration of theory with real-world clinical case application, each chapter also shows clinicians how to incorporate a particular treatment approach and make it a viable and effective part of their work with this challenging clinical population.
Presents strategies for helping children with autism interact with others and achieve their potential, covering such areas as back-and-forth interactions, nonverbal communication, and imitation.
This book brings together the latest research in the battle against autism. Autism is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life. The result of a neurological disorder that affects the functioning of the brain, autism and its associated behaviours have been estimated to occur in as many as 2 to 6 in 1,000 individuals. Autism is four times more prevalent in boys than girls and knows no racial, ethnic, or social boundaries. Autism is a spectrum disorder. The symptoms and characteristics of autism can present themselves in a wide variety of combinations, from mild to severe. Although autism is defined by a certain set of behaviours, children and adults can exhibit any combination of the behaviours in any degree of severity. People with autism process and respond to information in unique ways. In some cases, aggressive and/or self-injurious behaviour may be present.
This book is ideal for pre-service and in-service teachers required to implement effective evidence-based practices for children and youth with autism, particularly those who also have intellectual disabilities. It provides instructions, sample forms, and other practical tools necessary to improve students' educational outcomes. An overview discusses the educational needs of students with autism as well as key issues including etiological research, behavioral characteristics, diagnostic approaches, and program development and refinement. Subsequent chapters cover teaching methodologies, challenging behavior interventions, curriculum development, and related areas. The book is grounded in the scientifically supported premise that well-planned evidenced-based strategies, accurately implemented, can empower students and help teachers guide students to increasingly independent functioning. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Handbook of Evidence-Based Practice in Clinical Psychology, Volume 1 covers the evidence-based practices now identified for treating children and adolescents with a wide range of DSM disorders. Topics include fundamental issues, developmental disorders, behavior and habit disorders, anxiety and mood disorders, and eating disorders. Each chapter provides a comprehensive review of the evidence-based practice literature for each disorder and then covers several different treatment types for clinical implementation. Edited by the renowned Peter Sturmey and Michel Hersen and featuring contributions from experts in the field, this reference is ideal for academics, researchers, and libraries.

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