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Two boys—a Brooklyn Jew and a Mid-western farmer—each possessing no more than a stereotype regarding one another when they meet, find themselves randomly thrust together in their first weeks of college life. As each seeks to understand what it means to grow up, they find a connection so strong, that neither religion, nor upbringing, nor the prejudices formed by their disparate childhood experiences, can get in the way of their growing friendship. For they find that they share a common humanity, a zest for life and a love of baseball, strong enough to overcome all obstacles. In so doing they build a trust for one another so powerful, it can weather not only the toughest of times but the secrets they ultimately share. That Which Brings Us Together is a saga of two families lives, whose roots date back for generations starting in the 19th century. It is a tale of a decades-long friendship, whose characters share life’s great triumphs as well as its deep, dark challenges. It is a friendship, which only ends with an untimely death. And along the way, we come face to face with the existential question of, how do you find the strength to carry on, when you think that all hope is lost—when all of life’s forces have mounted the perfect storm against you? It is a window into life’s journey—the one that we are all on together and the one that we eventually must face all alone. Living in an age where society is more and more fractured by its perceived divisions, the question is posed—would the world be a better place, if we are willing to open ourselves up to those who seem so different from us? Innocent, heart-warming, sad, often wise, and occasionally surprising, That Which Brings Us Together will leave readers longing for a different time—or committed more than ever, to getting to really know their fellow human beings.
Provides a model for queering motherhood that resists racist, neoliberal, and hetero- or homonormative ideals of “good” mothering.
This fiftieth anniversary edition of W. Gunther Plaut’s classic volume on the beginnings of the Jewish Reform Movement is updated with a new introduction by Howard A. Berman. The Rise of Reform Judaism covers the first one hundred years of the movement, from the time of the eighteenth-century Jewish Enlightenment leader Moses Mendelssohn to the conclusion of the Augsburg synod in 1871. In these pages the founders who established liberal Judaism speak for themselves through their journals and pamphlets, books and sermons, petitions and resolutions, and public arguments and disputations. Each selection includes Plaut’s brief introduction and sketch of the reformer. Important topics within Judaism are addressed in these writings: philosophy and theology, religious practice, synagogue services, and personal life, as well as controversies on the permissibility of organ music, the introduction of the sermon, the nature of circumcision, the observance of the Sabbath, the rights of women, and the authenticity of the Bible.
This volume brings together for the first time the highly influential essays, many of them classics, of one of the most prominent scholars in social philosophy and feminist theory. These essays provide a compelling view of many of the major trends in social theory over the past fifteen years—trends that Linda Nicholson herself helped to shape.The Play of Reason examines the legacies of modernity in contemporary political, social, and feminist thought and the unraveling of these legacies in postmodern times. Linda Nicholson first focuses on the tension in modern social theory between attempts to recognize change and diversity and struggles to capture such change in overarching frameworks of meaning and value. She illuminates the consequences of these conflicting tendencies in relation to Marxism, feminist theory, and classical liberal accounts of the family and the state. Nicholson then asks how theory and the resolution of difference are possible after such overarching frameworks are abandoned. She shows how a pragmatic understanding of theory answers widespread fears about relativism. The Play of Reason is a powerful demonstration of a politically engaged social theory.

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