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Fatal Blaze? "The Bride Who Cried." That was the title of the dinner-theater murder mystery presented at Maryland's luxurious Harbourtowne resort on Valentine's Day weekend, 1998. But no tears were being shed by Kimberly Hricko at 3 a.m. when she reported a fire in the room she shared with her husband, Stephen. Rescuers found him dead, badly burned around the upper body. It seemed that he'd fallen asleep while smoking a cigar, sparking off an inferno. Staged Murder But Kimberly's efforts to play the part of an innocent widow quickly began to unravel. Sleuths learned that she had been having an affair with a man ten years her junior. She also stood to inherit $400,000 on her husband's death--and had tried to bribe a coworker to kill Stephen for $50,000. In the courtroom, prosecutors argued that Kimberly injected her sleeping spouse with a lethal dose of muscle relaxant and set the fire to cover her tracks. For a cold-blooded killer who acted without remorse, there could only be one verdict. . . Linda Rosencrance has fifteen years experience as a reporter, writing for both the Boston Globe and the Boston Herald, as well as many community papers in the Boston metropolitan area. She is the author of Murder at Morses Pond and has also written an anthology examining various crimes on college campuses. She lives in the Boston area.
When she starts her job at Sawyer Developmental Center, Janet Nelson is young, attractive, and nave. It doesnt take long for things to change. Her innocence makes her a target, and she soon receives the attention of Barton Cleese, director at Sawyer. He wants to make Janet his mistress, and he will have herbecause he always gets what he wants. In this corporate world, everyone is out for blood. Theres the assistant director, Cleeses current mistress, who is now in charge of training Janet as her replacement. There are supervisors and CEOs who will say yes to anything in exchange for a fat paycheck or a step up the ladder. Caught in a web of deceit and hostility, Janet must be on her guard on and off the job. When things take a turn for the worse, its Janet versus the Sawyer administration. She decides to take matters into her own hands, wreaking revenge on all those who have wronged her with the help of her intellect and her imagination. She knows murder is against the law, but some people need to die. Some people need to be destroyed for the good of humanity.
The author presents an in-depth account to the background, motivation and mental state of serial sexual killers.
What turns an apparently 'normal' individual into a killer? Many people who commit "rage type" murders have no history of violence. Using psychoanalytic theory and a number of case studies, this book isolates key psychological factors that appear to help explain why such acts of extreme violence occur. Starting from a psychoanalytic standpoint, Psychoanalysis, Violence and Rage-Type Murder argues for a pluralistic approach to understanding aggression, and claims that the origins of aggression have no single source or cause. Drawing broadly on psychological, criminological and psychoanalytic research the author outlines the clinical features of the act and explores the possible role that psychopathology and personality might play in the build up to murder. These observations raise a number of questions about the so-called 'normality' of the individual alongside the capacity to commit murder, and how we might understand the stability of such offenders. Psychoanalysis, Violence and Rage-Type Murder will be of great interest to psychotherapists, forensic psychotherapists, psychoanalysts, psychologists, criminologists and health care workers.
A rare expert analysis of the law and its faults. Shows how Governments have failed to grapple with defects in this area of crime and punishment. Dispels the myths that lie behind politicians' excuses for not creating a modern and just law of murder. Many people will find it hard to believe that deep within key aspects of the Law of England and Wales there lie significant defects—such is the extent to which our laws and justice system have been routinely described as 'the best in the world'. This new analysis by reform group Modernising Justice demonstrates just how wrong this view is in relation to one of the most serious all crimes. Murder remains a common law offence based on an ancient and somewhat vague definition and beset with an approach to punishment still steeped in the fallout from the abolition of the death penalty. The authors demonstrate just why change is needed. Their arguments are set out concisely and with a directness not often found in legal debates. Their ongoing correspondence with successive Ministers of Justice is reproduced to demonstrate how cautiously the Executive tends to move in an arena where law and order policies can be judged (and elections won or lost) by popular responses to this particular crime.
People are horrified when parents kill their children, yet this act occurs daily on a global basis. Endangered Children: Neonaticide, Infanticide and Filicide provides a psychological, sociological, and criminological perspective of these acts, as the authors answer the many questions that arise from these crimes. With an emphasis on neonati
Although numerous books have been separately written on mental disorders and law, there is as yet no readily accessible literature dealing with both these disciplines in a single volume in Singapore and Malaysia. This present text is therefore intended to fill this gap with two aims in mind, i.e., to address the need for a practical manual useful for ready reference to the clinician, the lawyer advising his client and also for other interested laymen, and for the reader's general information and knowledge. Each chapter is structured to provide an overview of both the psychiatric and legal aspects of the subject matter. Wherever applicable or feasible, an analysis of local cases is made and comparative evaluation attempted with materials from other countries, especially those prevailing in common law and Anglo-American jurisdictions. The local law as presented in this book applies to both Singapore and Malaysia but where there exist differences, these are highlighted in the text itself.
This consultation paper reviews the law relating to homicide in England and Wales, and sets out a number of provisional proposals in order to establish a more rational and coherent framework of legislation. Issues discussed include: the existing law and problems with it; the definition of murder and manslaughter; partial defences including provocation, diminished responsibility and duress; the fault element in murder and the concept of intention; and the doctrine of double-effect. The paper proposes the creation of a new Homicide Act (to replace the Homicide Act 1957) to establish clear definitions of murder and the partial defences to it, as well as defining manslaughter, within a graduated system of offences (the ladder principle) to reflect seriousness of offence and degrees of mitigation. For example, the offence of murder should be divided into two categories, of 'first degree murder' (with a mandatory life sentence) and 'second degree' (with a discretionary life sentence maximum). Responses to the consultation paper proposals should be received by 13.04.2006.
The felony murder doctrine is one of the most widely criticized features of American criminal law. Legal scholars almost unanimously condemn it as irrational, concluding that it imposes punishment without fault and presumes guilt without proof. Despite this, the law persists in almost every U.S. jurisdiction. Felony Murder is the first book on this controversial legal doctrine. It shows that felony murder liability rests on a simple and powerful idea: that the guilt incurred in attacking or endangering others depends on one's reasons for doing so. Inflicting harm is wrong, and doing so for a bad motive—such as robbery, rape, or arson—aggravates that wrong. In presenting this idea, Guyora Binder criticizes prevailing academic theories of criminal intent for trying to purge criminal law of moral judgment. Ultimately, Binder shows that felony murder law has been and should remain limited by its justifying aims.
Given the long-standing belief that children ought to be shielded from disturbing life events, it is surprising to see how many stories for kids involve killing. Bloody Murder is the first full-length critical study of this pervasive theme of murder in children’s literature. Through rereadings of well-known works, such as Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, the Nancy Drew Mystery Stories, and The Outsiders, Michelle Ann Abate explores how acts of homicide connect these works with an array of previously unforeseen literary, social, political, and cultural issues. Topics range from changes in the America criminal justice system, the rise of forensic science, and shifting attitudes about crime and punishment to changing cultural conceptions about the nature of evil and the different ways that murder has been popularly presented and socially interpreted. Bloody Murder adds to the body of inquiry into America's ongoing fascination with violent crime. Abate argues that when narratives for children are considered along with other representations of homicide in the United States, they not only provide a more accurate portrait of the range, depth, and variety of crime literature, they also alter existing ideas about the meaning of violence, the emotional appeal of fear, and the cultural construction of death and dying.
In recent years, there has been a surge in school shootings, workplace homicides, hate violence, and deadly terrorist attacks in the United States. This has resulted in a greater focus on homicidal behavior, its antecedents, ways to recognize warning signs of at-risk victims and offenders, and preventive measures. It has also led to increased effor
The Language of Murder Cases describes fifteen court cases for which Roger W. Shuy served as an expert language witness. Investigations and trials in murder cases are guided by the important legal terms describing the mental states of defendants: intentionality, predisposition, and voluntariness. Unfortunately, statutes and dictionaries can provide only loose definitions, largely because mental states are virtually impossible to define. The meaning of these terms, therefore, must be adduced either by inferences and assumptions, or by any available language evidence-often the best window into a speaker's mind. Fortunately, this window of evidence exists primarily in electronically recorded undercover conversations, police interviews, and legal hearings and trials, all of which are subject to linguistic analysis before and during trial. In this book, Shuy explains how vague legal terminology can be clarified by analysis of the language used by suspects, defendants, law enforcement officers, and attorneys. He examines speech events, schemas, agendas, speech acts, conversational strategies, as well as smaller language units such as syntax, lexicon, and phonology, and discusses how these can play a major role in deciding murder cases. In his analysis, Shuy draws on his personal experience testifying at fifteen fascinating murder trials, focusing on the role that language played in each. He concludes with a summary of how his analyses were regarded by the juries as they struggled with the equally vague concept of reasonable doubt.
A man murders his wife after she has admitted her infidelity; another man kills an openly gay teammate after receiving a massage; a third man, white, goes for a jog in a “bad” neighborhood, carrying a pistol, and shoots an African American teenager who had his hands in his pockets. When brought before the criminal justice system, all three men argue that they should be found “not guilty”; the first two use the defense of provocation, while the third argues he used his gun in self-defense. Drawing upon these and similar cases, Cynthia Lee shows how two well-established, traditional criminal law defenses—the doctrines of provocation and self-defense—enable majority-culture defendants to justify their acts of violence. While the reasonableness requirement, inherent in both defenses, is designed to allow community input and provide greater flexibility in legal decision-making, the requirement also allows majority-culture defendants to rely on dominant social norms, such as masculinity, heterosexuality, and race (i.e., racial stereotypes), to bolster their claims of reasonableness. At the same time, Lee examines other cases that demonstrate that the reasonableness requirement tends to exclude the perspectives of minorities, such as heterosexual women, gays and lesbians, and persons of color. Murder and the Reasonable Man not only shows how largely invisible social norms and beliefs influence the outcomes of certain criminal cases, but goes further, suggesting three tentative legal reforms to address problems of bias and undue leniency. Ultimately, Lee cautions that the true solution lies in a change in social attitudes.
Vols. 65-96 include "Central law journal's international law list."

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