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This expanded edition continues Diop's campaign for the political and economic unification of the nations of black Africa. It concludes with a lengthy interview with Diop.
Challenging societal beliefs, this volume rethinks African and world history from an Afrocentric perspective.
This book, the first in a series of work on Africans, whose life and thought have left a major impact on the world, is devoted to the Senegalese physicist, historian and linguist, Dr. Cheikh Anta Diop, who was born in Diourbel, Senegal on December 29, 1923, and died in Dakar on February 7, 1986. No figure in the field of African civilization studies has been more highly regarded in the French and English-speaking world than Diop. In 1966 the First World Festival of Arts and Culture attributed jointly to the late W.E.B. DuBois and Dr. Cheikh Anta Diop its "Award of the Scholar who had exerted the greatest influence on Negro thought in the 20th century." The book has nearly a hundred illustrations. Great African Thinkers--Vol. 1., Chiekh Anta Diop features impressions of the man--"Conversations with Diop and Tsegaye" by Jan Carey; critiques of his major works "The Cultural Unity of Africa: the Domains of Patriarchy and of Matriarchy in Classical Antiquity" by Asa Hillard III, "The Changing Perception of Cheikh Anta Diop and his work" by James G. Spady, "Cheikh Anta Diop and the New concept of African History" by John Henrik Clarke; "The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality"--Review by A.J. Williams-Meyers; "Civilization or Barbarianism: the Legacy of Cheikh Anta Diop" by Leonard Jeffried, Jr. and "Diop on Asia: Highlights and Insights" by Runoko Rashidi; interviews "Africa's Political Unity," "Emancipation and Unity," "Negritude and the African personality" and "Ethnicity and National Consciousness" by Carlos Moore; "Dr. Chiekh Anta Diop" by Shawna Moore, "Meeting the Pharaoh" and "Further Conversation with the Pharaoh" by Charles S. Finch; the first authorized English translation of the introduction and two opening chapters from his last major work "Civilization or Barbarism: An Authentic Anthropology" by Edward G. Taylor; a selection of essays by Diop--"Origin of the Ancient Egyptians;" "Iron Metallurgy in the Ancient Egyptian Empire" a translation by Darryl Prevost; "Africa's contribution to the Exact Sciences" and a selection of lectures made during his first and only visit to the United States.
African Origins of Monotheism recasts an African knowledge of God in a new and original way. It aims to recapture concepts of God as originally reflected upon by pristine African religious thinkers. Muzorewa is seeking after the traditional African understandings of the Divine, which trace their origins back before the rise of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Monotheism, he maintains, is the ancient view of God, ubiquitous across the continent of Africa; indeed, monotheism comes "out of Africa." The book challenges the way that the idea of God has been manipulated by Eurocentric agendas, by colonizers, enslavers, and empire builders, all of whom were using God-talk to achieve their own personal ends. In African thinking, the God concept is guided by a sense of the presence of the all-pervasive and omnipresent God, which has instilled in the people a sense of respect for life at all costs. Thus, respect is not based on a commandment or on fear but on a propensity for affinity.
With this book, theologian and political observer Allan Boesak once again displays the strengths of his writings that were evident in the seventies and eighties: bringing Christian theology to bear on the political and socio-economic realities of our world. “A serious and open-hearted commentary on the African Renaissance and the spirituality of politics, but with the clarity of the deeply embedded Christian message.” – Danny Titus
This introductory survey provides a rich understanding of the African experience which, until recently, either had been omitted from the curriculum of institutions of higher learning or was distorted in written and oral literature. The book identifies the post-World War II civil rights movement in America and the independence revolution in Africa as the most decisive forces that generated interest in the study of the African/black experience. Includes four theoretical models for interpreting the black experience. The author discusses the place and role of Africa in the development of human civilization, focusing on Africa's Nile Valley civilizations and Western Sudanic empires. It probes aspects of traditional African culture, including the family, traditional political institutions and religion, and analyzes the impact on Africa and its peoples of such historical traumas as slavery, colonialism, and decolonization.
During the second half of the twentieth century, the Arab intellectual and political scene polarized between a search for totalizing doctrines—nationalist, Marxist, and religious—and radical critique. Arab thinkers were reacting to the disenchanting experience of postindependence Arab states, as well as to authoritarianism, intolerance, and failed development. They were also responding to successive defeats by Israel, humiliation, and injustice. The first book to take stock of these critical responses, this volume illuminates the relationship between cultural and political critique in the work of major Arab thinkers, and it connects Arab debates on cultural malaise, identity, and authenticity to the postcolonial issues of Latin America and Africa, revealing the shared struggles of different regions and various Arab concerns.

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