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The basis of the fourth season of the television phenomenon starring Aidan Turner, The Angry Tide is the seventh novel in Winston Graham's hugely popular Poldark series. Cornwall, towards the end of the 18th century. Ross Poldark sits for the borough of Truro as Member of Parliament - his time divided between London and Cornwall, his heart divided about his wife, Demelza. His old feud with George Warleggan still flares - as does the illicit love between Morwenna and Drake, Demelza's brother. Before the new century dawns, George and Ross will be drawn together by a loss greater than their rivalry - and Morwenna and Drake by a tragedy that brings them hope . . . The Angry Tide is followed by the eighth book in the Poldark series, The Stranger From The Sea.
On his eleventh birthday, schoolboy Magnus Fin found out that he is half selkie – part human, part seal. Although he looks like a boy and lives on land, he can breathe underwater. When a rusty metal chest is flung ashore in a storm, Magnus Fin decides to investigate. But he injures his hand on the strange box, and his sealskin starts to show through. His teacher realises that there's something very unusual about Magnus Fin -- and rumours start to spread. Deep in the ocean, the great sea god Neptune has problems of his own. The treasures of wisdom have been stolen, and his memory and powers are fading fast. Could his missing treasure be inside the chest that's been washed ashore? Magnus Fin is the only one who can find out and restore order under the sea. But a young journalist is investigating the rumours about 'fish people'. Can Magnus Fin complete his mission before the selkie secret is revealed and his selkie family are forced to leave the bay forever? Janis Mackay also wrote the Kelpies Prize-winning Magnus Fin and the Ocean Quest, and Magnus Fin and the Moonlight Mission. This is the third book in the series.
WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY JOHN BURNSIDE When Charles Arrowby retires from his glittering career in the London theatre, he buys a remote house on the rocks by the sea. He hopes to escape from his tumultuous love affairs but unexpectedly bumps into his childhood sweetheart and sets his heart on destroying her marriage. His equilibrium is further disturbed when his friends all decide to come and keep him company and Charles finds his seaside idyll severely threatened by his obsessions.
Bella Poldark is the twelfth and final novel in Winston Graham's hugely popular Poldark series, and continues the story after the fifth TV series, which has become a television phenomenon starring Aidan Turner. The enchanting saga of Ross, Demelza and the Poldark family concludes in this, the last book in the epic series. Bella, the Poldarks’ youngest daughter, is a precociously talented singer and is encouraged to pursue a career by her old flame and by a distinguished French conductor who has more in mind than Bella’s music . . . Meanwhile, Valentine Warleggan, whose existence keeps open the old wounds of the feud between Ross and George, leads an increasingly wayward existence. And Clowance, the Poldarks’ widowed daughter, is considering remarrying to one of two rival suitors. But a cloud hangs over Cornwall, as a murderer stalks the villages looking for new victims . . . 'From the incomparable Winston Graham . . . who has everything that anyone else has, and then a whole lot more.' Guardian
Set in the last years of Elizabeth I's reign, Winston Graham's The Grove of Eagles seamlessly blends historical fact and fiction in a rich tale full of unforgettable characters. In 1588 the Spanish Armada had been defeated in the English Channel and the whole of Elizabethan England was alert for the revenge that surely had to follow. On the Cornish coast, men like John Killigrew - in charge of the castle at Pendennis - were vital to the survival of the country, and on their backs rested the trust of those defending the nation. His eldest but base-born son, Maugan, emerges in the novel, through his loneliness and his love, as a touchingly honest and believable character who is, above all things, a man of his word.
Ash is James Herbert’s most controversial novel, and will make you wonder what is fact and what is fiction. Fear will let you in. Terror will keep you there. They were miscreants with black souls, roaming the corridors and passageways. Infamous people thought long-deceased. Hiding and nurturing their evil in a basement full of secrets so shocking they would shake the world if they were ever revealed. David Ash, ghost hunter and parapsychologist, arrives at Comraich Castle – a desolate, ancient place with a dark heart – to investigate a series of disturbing events. An incorporeal power has been ignited by a long-ago curse, fed and now unleashed by the evil of those who once inhabited this supposed sanctuary – and by some who still do. Yet their hour of retribution is at hand . . .
Glenn Bowers ancestors came from England, Germany, and Scotland. They included farmers, sailors, teachers, merchants, ministers, poets and politicians. Many of them fought and died in wars. The varied themes of each chapter are common to previous generations of many American families. The storylines include the following persons: Wilhelm Bar (William Bower) came to America in 1833 with his five brothers because his parents were concerned about militarism in their native Wrrtemberg. He joined the 29th Ohio in the Civil War, as did 3 brothers, and he died in prison after being captured in their second battle. Margaret Polk Colburn was the first woman physician in Henry County, Indiana. Her husband had served with her father in Accomac, Virginia, during the Revolutionary War. Her ancestors included members of three notable Scottish clans: Maxwells, Polloks and Sempills; and her distant cousins included Confederate General and Episcopal Bishop Leonidas Polk and President James K. Polk. Margarets son, John R. Colburn, was born in North Carolina and became an abolitionist preacher in Missouri during the Civil War. His son served as an armed guard at the services. Ten year old Georg Trimmers mother and 159 other passengers on the Davy, as well as the captain and both mates, died during the 1738 voyage from Amsterdam to Philadelphia. Georg and his father Hans were among the 121 surviving passengers brought into port by the ships carpenter who had become the senior officer. Charles Wright wrote a book about the service of his regiment, the 81st Ohio, during the Civil War; he later served many years as town clerk for Oxford, Ohio, and briefly as mayor. General Israel Putnam was famous for his leadership and bravery during the French and Indian War as well as the Revolutionary War. In 1767 a pregnant Irish girl named Katie was waiting for Israel with her wedding dress when she heard of his marriage to a wealthy widow; she raised their son John in western Massachusetts. An older sister and brother of Samuel Jones were taken from their farm by Wyandot Indians in 1777; they survived separately for many years in captivity, and were both ultimately reunited with their family. Stephen Hopkins survived the 1609 shipwreck of the Sea Venture on its way to Jamestown, and then brought his family to America in 1620 on the Mayflower. The Royalls were watermen in Norfolk, England. Edmund was crushed to death between a boat and the dock in the late 1800s; several of his children emigrated to Canada and then Washington, D.C. Amos Bassett was 13 when the Civil War started; 2 of his 3 brothers who were old enough to serve died soon after they enlisted. One of his wife Matildas brothers lost his left leg in the war 8 days before it ended, and 6 days after he turned 21. Amoss first Bassett ancestor in America arrived in 1621 on the Fortune, the second ship to land at the Plymouth Colony.

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