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Teaching in the Art Museum investigates the mission, history, theory, practice, and future prospects of museum education. In this book Rika Burnham and Elliott Kai-Kee define and articulate a new approach to gallery teaching, one that offers groups of visitors deep and meaningful experiences of interpreting art works through a process of intense, sustained looking and thoughtfully facilitated dialogue.--[book cover].
This book presents a critical analysis of the power and opportunity created in the implementation of community engaged practices within art museums, by looking at the networks connecting art museums to community organizations, artists and residents. The Art Museum Redefined places the interaction of art museums and urban neighbourhoods as the central focus of the study, to investigate how museums and artists collaborate with residents and local community groups. Rather than defining the community solely from the perspective of a museum looking out at its audience, the research examines the larger networks of art organizing and creative activism connected to the museum that are active across the neighbourhood. Taylor's research encompasses the grassroots efforts of local groups and their collaboration with museums and other art institutions that are extending their reach outside their physical walls and into the community. This focus on social engagement speaks to recent emphasis in cultural policy on cultural equity and inclusion, creative place-making and community engagement at neighbourhood and city-levels, and will be of interest to students, scholars and policy-makers alike.
In recent years, the emerging field of museum studies has seen rapid expansion in the critical study of museums and scholars started to question the institution and its functions. To contribute differentiated viewpoints to the currently evolving meta-discourse on the museum, this volume aims to investigate how the institution of the museum has been visualized and translated into different kinds of images and how these images have affected our perception of these institutions. In this interdisciplinary collection, scholars from a variety of academic backgrounds, including art history, heritage, museums studies and architectural history, explore a broad range of case studies stretching across the globe. The volume opens up debate about the epistemological and historiographical significance of a variety of different images and representations of the Art Museum, including the transformation or adaptation of the image of the art museum across periods and cultures. In this context, this volume aims to develop a new theoretical framework while proposing new methodological tools and resources for the analysis of museological representations on a global scale.
This book accompanies and celebrates the inaugural exhibition at the new Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, designed by the Japanese architect Tadao Ando. The central subject of and impetus for this building from the beginning has been art, with particular emphasis on the display of the permanent collection. Of the 153,000 square feet of space to support space that emphasizes art like few museums in the world. That the first exhibition in these pristine galleries is devoted to the collection is a testament of pride and priority. Works by approximately 150 artists, covering a wide range of movements, especially postwar Abstract Expressionism, Pop art, and Minimalism, are currently displayed over the Museum's three two-story gallery pavilions. Together they present a broad range of styles and media, from oil, acrylic, and mixed-media paintings and drawings to photography, sculpture, installation art, and video and digital imagery. In honor of the Museum's 110th anniversary, 110 of these artists have been chosen for inclusion in this publication. Each artist's work is presented in the form of a large color plate and a detailed text entry, together with footnotes and key artist information. A selection of the artists - notably Philip Guston, Anselm Kiefer, Gerhard Richter, and Robert Motherwell - are presented in the form of extended monographic essays, accompanied by up to eight works, as a reflection of their importance in the Museum's permanent collection and their wider importance in the development of postwar art.
An introduction to such mathematical concepts as patterns, composition and symmetry explains mathematical properties that can be found in art through the story of a young boy who, with his family, explores hidden and visible mathematical elements in famous masterpieces.
Rethinking Research in the Art Museum presents an original and radical perspective on how research can function as an agent of change in art museums today. The book analyses a range of art organisations and draws on numerous interviews with museum professionals to outline the limitations of existing models of museum research. Arguing for a more democratic formulation in tune with the current needs and ambitions of the art institution, Emily Pringle puts forward a framework for practitioner-led, co-produced research that redefines how knowledge is created in the museum. Recognising that museums today negotiate multiple agendas, the book outlines the value of constructing the art museum professional as a practitioner researcher and their work as a mode of practice-based research, be they educators, archivists, curators or conservators. Locating these arguments within the framework of new museology, critical pedagogy, professional and organisational studies and epistemology, the book offers insights and guidance for those interested in how art museums function and the role research plays within these complex institutions. Rethinking Research in the Art Museum provides a timely and important resource for museum professionals and scholars, students, artists and community members. It should be of particular interest to those invested in exploring how art museums can continue to make the most of their unique resources, whilst becoming more collaborative, inclusive and relevant to the twenty-first century.
Illustrated with over fifty photos, Civilizing Rituals merges contemporary debates with lively discussion and explores central issues involved in the making and displaying of art as industry and how it is presented to the community. Carol Duncan looks at how nations, institutions and private individuals present art , and how art museums are shaped by cultural, social and political determinants. Civilizing Rituals is ideal reading for students of art history and museum studies, and professionals in the field will also find much of interest here.
The basic guide to the Asian Art Museum's collections, now in its seventh printing
Aimed at museum educators, Multiculturalism in Art Museums Today seeks to marry museum and multicultural education theories. It reveals how the union of these theories yields more equitable educational practices and guides museum educators to address misrepresentation, exclusivity, accessibility, and educational inequality.
" ... the writer undertook in this studyan evaluation of the seven major art museums of Texas and their contribution to public-school education. Chapter I served as an introduction to the study. Chapter II traced the development of the art museum in American, dating back to the period of colonial settlements in New England. It also presented the history of the art museums in the five key cities of Texas: the Elisabet Ney Museum of Austin, the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Fine Arts of Houston, the Fort Worth Art Association, the Children's Museum of Forth Worth, the Witte Memorial Museum of San Antonio and the Contemporary Arts Association of Houston. In addition, the general policies and programs of the Texas museums were discussed. Chapter III evaluated the programs of the seven majoy art museums according to the standards set up by the Texas Art Education Association ... Chapter IV will present the writer's conclusions and recommendations."--Leaves 35-36.
A little boy visits an art museum for the first time in this fun, sweet picture book about first experiences and seeing things from new perspectives. Simon is having a great time at the museum with his parents. There are slippery, slidey floors! Pigeons flying around the reflecting pool! And cheesecake in the café! But they’re not really here for any of that. No, Simon has to look at art. And more art. So. Much. Art. There’s so much art that soon Simon needs to take a break and finds somewhere to sit. From his bench, he begins to notice how many different people are visiting the museum and the many different ways they react to the art they see. Some people are alone. Some are in groups. Some people smile. Some shake their heads. Some even shed a tear. And Simon is right in the center of it, watching until he’s inspired to give all the art another try. By the end of the day, he may even find a piece that can rival a slice of cheesecake!

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