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Shows the evolution of the art of the video game "The Last of Us," including concept art and commentary from the creators.
Although Abraham Lincoln was among seven presidents who served during the tumultuous years between the end of the Mexican War and the end of the Reconstruction era, history has not been kind to the others: Zachary Taylor, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Andrew Johnson, and Ulysses S. Grant. In contrast, history sees Abraham Lincoln as a giant in character and deeds. During his presidency, he governed brilliantly, developed the economy, liberated four million people from slavery, reunified the nation, and helped enact the Homestead Act, among other accomplishments. He proved to be not only an outstanding commander in chief but also a skilled diplomat, economist, humanist, educator, and moralist. Lincoln achieved that and more because he was a master of the art of American power. He understood that the struggle for hearts and minds was the essence of politics in a democracy. He asserted power mostly by appealing to peopleÆs hopes rather than their fears. All along he tried to shape rather than reflect prevailing public opinions that differed from his own. To that end, he was brilliant at bridging the gap between progressives and conservatives by reining in the former and urging on the latter. His art of power ultimately reflected his unswerving devotion to the Declaration of IndependenceÆs principles and the ConstitutionÆs institutions, or as he so elegantly expressed it, ôto a government of the people, by the people, and for the people.ö
To live well one must be able to die well and vice versa. Life and death are two faces of the same coin but with a fundamental transformation when one moves from the spiritual dimension to the physical and back to the spiritual. Actually, there is but one thing: Life without beginning and without ending but with two expressions, one on the spiritual plane and the other on the material plane. Today, in the West we find a great paradox: we have made enormous progress at the material, technological level but not at the human and psychological level. One aspect of this paradox is that we do not die well! We are afraid of death, we deny it and seek to postpone it for as long as possible at an enormous human and economic cost. The spiritual tradition always had very substantial cognitive and practical contributions to make to our understanding of life, death, and life after death. The basic objective of this book is to present these contributions and help us die with more dignity and less fear. In fact, this work was written to help you live and die without fear, anxiety, guilt, blame or frustration with an appreciation and gratitude for all our human experiences which include birth, life and death.
In listening to a fine speech, well delivered, the effect seems to spring from a wonderful spontaneity; all is so natural, and so apparently facile in achievement. Lucidly logical, and now passionately moved; anon, diverting with wit, humour, or sarcasm; suddenly transporting us into the realms of fancy, the speaker is always arresting, and enchains the attention and sympathies of his entire audience.-from "Chapter IV: Fluency of Thought, Ideas, Etc. Mental Aspect in Public Speaking"If you've been searching for a "complete guide to the Preparation and Delivery of Speeches and the Development of Mind, Ideas, Vocabulary, and Expressions required by Public Speakers," here you go. Published in 1911, the advice this handy little tome offers is quite helpful... if you can find it through the author's florid prose and dictatorial attitude. From preparing mentally to give a speech and training one's memory to recall your words to such practical matters as breathing exercises and lists of vocabulary words with which to practice pronunciations, you'll learn much... and feel as if you've gotten your knuckles rapped. BONUS! Practice with the supplied speeches from the Earl of Chatham (1708-1778) on the "importance of the colonies," Benjamin Disraeli (1804-1881) on the "repeal of the corn laws," Lord Macaulay (1800-1859) on "Parliamentary reform," and others!OF INTEREST TO: fans of kitsch, public speakersAUTHOR BIO: ERNEST GUY PERTWEE was professor of elocution at City of London School, and is also the author of The Reciter's Treasury of Verse, Scenes from Dickens for Drawing-Room and Platform Acting, and other books.
"It's not easy to reveal the achievments of a woman whose job is rooted in confidentiality, therefore observations and deductions made by the author are solely his. Living with an adept psychotherapist is, in itself, an awakening experience. The nuances, the subtelties of silent exchange, will soon sharpen the layman's awarenes."
Musical theater has captivated American audiences from its early roots in burlesque stage productions and minstrel shows to the million-dollar industry it has become on Broadway today. What is it about this truly indigenous American art form that has made it so enduringly popular? How has it survived, even thrived, alongside the technology of film and the glitz and glamour of Hollywood? Will it continue to evolve and leave its mark on the twenty-first century? Bringing together exclusive and previously unpublished interviews with nineteen leading composers, lyricists, librettists, directors, choreographers, and producers from the mid-1900s to the present, this book details the careers of the individuals who shaped this popular performance art during its most prolific period. The interviewees discuss their roles in productions ranging from On the Town (1944) and Finian's Rainbow (1947) to The Producers (2001) and Bounce (2003). Readers are taken onto the stage, into the rehearsals, and behind the scenes. The nuts and bolts, the alchemy, and the occasional agonies of the collaborative process are all explored. In their discussions, the artists detail their engagements with other creative forces, including such major talents as Leonard Bernstein, Jerome Robbins, Bob Fosse, Liza Minnelli, Judy Garland, Barbra Streisand, Jule Styne, Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, Alan Jay Lerner, Zero Mostel, and Gwen Verdon. They speak candidly about their own work and that of their peers, their successes and failures, the creative process, and how a show progresses from its conception through rehearsals and tryouts to opening night. Taken together, these interviews give fresh insight into what Oscar Hammerstein called "a nightly miracle"--the creation of the American musical.
The Art of Successful living is a compilation of three of his most well-known essays – Love, Friendship and Self-Reliance. In these essays, he challenges and investigates the age-old traditions and insists on the interpretation of the ideal and the real, of the spiritual and the material.

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