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Can the political institutions of the transatlantic alliance endure the demise of the Soviet enemy? Did the Iraq crisis of 2002–3 signal the final demise of the Atlantic partnership? If so, what are the likely consequences? In this book a distinguished group of political scientists and historians from Europe and the United States tackle these questions. The book examines the causes and consequences of the crisis in Atlantic relations that accompanied the invasion of Iraq in March 2003. The authors' collective focus is not on the war itself, or how it was conducted, or even the situation in Iraq either before or after the conflict. Instead, the crisis over Iraq is the starting point for an examination of transatlantic relations and specifically the Atlantic alliance, an examination that is cross-national in scope and multi-disciplinary in approach.
A Responsible Europe? seeks to understand the EU's global role from a distinct normative perspective. It identifies moral principles that could serve as guidelines for a responsible role of the EU in global affairs, and applies these principles to selected policy areas and regional co-operation frameworks.
This book examines the role played by affect and emotions to provide a new perspective on alliances and friendly relations among states. Through a theoretical and empirical examination of the historical relationships of members of the Atlantic alliance, it underlines and explains the connections between affect, the occurrence of crises, and the repair of those crises in close allies' relationships. Using empirical data and close examinations of the decision-makers in Atlantic alliance countries during the 1956 Suez Crisis, the 1966 NATO crisis, and the 2003 Iraq crisis, Eznack constructs a new history and theory of the workings of alliances.
This book examines the evolution of European-American relations with the Middle East since 1945. Placing the current transatlantic debates on the Middle East into a broader context, this work analyses how, why, and to what extent European and US roles, interests, threat perceptions, and policy attitudes in the region have changed, relating to both the region as a whole and the two main issues analysed: Gulf Security and the Arab-Israeli Conflict. The contributors then go on to discuss the implications of these developments for Western policymaking. The volume makes four key contributions. First, it examines the subject matter from a truly transatlantic perspective, with all chapters adopting a bi- or multilateral approach, taking into account the views from both the US and individual European countries or the EC/EU collectively. Second, the book takes a long-term view, covering a series of crises and developments over the past six decades. Third, it has a systematic structure, with the predominantly chronological order of the chapters being geared towards depicting trends and evolutions with regard to the key themes of the book. Finally, the book builds bridges between historians and political scientists/analysts, as well as between experts of transatlantic relations and Middle East scholars. This book will be of great interest to students of transatlantic relations, the Middle East, US foreign policy, European politics, international history and IR in general. Daniel Möckli is a Senior Researcher at the Center for Security Studies (CSS), ETH Zurich. He is also the editor of CSS Analyses in Security Policy. Victor Mauer is Deputy Director and Head of Research of the Center for Security Studies (CSS), ETH Zurich, and Lecturer in the Department of Social Sciences and Humanities at ETH Zurich.
The future of European foreign policy is of vital significance to the developing world order. The failure of US policy in Iraq has underscored the need for Europe to play a constructive global role. Nevertheless, divisions within Europe over the Iraq war and over the future development of the European Union have raised questions about the potential for an effective European foreign policy—whether organized through EU institutions or via individual member states. This book will consider why Europe should assume global responsibilities, how they will be organized institutionally, whether they will be adequate to address pressing regional and security concerns, and how they will reflect the foreign policy interests of Europe’s major powers. It is the intention of this book to cover both thematic and country-specific issues, ranging from Europe’s responsibility as a global actor and EU-NATO relations to the specific influence of Germany, France, Italy and the United Kingdom. The contributors come from across the European Union and represent a mix of established and rising scholars. This book was published as a special issue of the Journal of European Integration.
This book offers an overview of the interface between European integration, transatlantic relations, and the 'rise of the rest' in the early 21st century. The collapse of the Soviet bloc opened up an era in which the drivers and perceived benefits of the US alliance among European countries have become more variegated and shifting. The proposition that the US remains at once an 'indispensable' and 'intolerable' nation in Europe is a key concept in the alliance, as the US remains inextricably tied to the continent through economic, military and cultural links. This work examines this complex subject area from many angles, including an analysis of the historical and cultural contexts of America’s relations with Europe, as well as a discussion of the politics of transatlantic affairs which utilises evidence gleaned from a series of case-studies. In the concluding chapters, the author assesses the likelihood that the West can entrench its global dominance in the realms of "soft" and "hard" power, and by effecting a "controlled reform" that will see multilateral structures open up to emerging powers. This book will be of great interest to students of European Politics, EU integration, transatlantic relations, US foreign policy/diplomacy, International Security and IR in general.
Thalakada argues that the principal purpose of US alliances have shifted since the end of the Cold War from containing communist expansionism (balance of power) to preserving and exercising US power (management of power).He also looks across all US alliances highlighting the trend from regionally-based to more globally-active alliances.

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