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One of the earliest memoirs of an American capitalist, this 1920 volume recounts an immigrant's rise from clerk to captain of industry and steel magnate. Includes Carnegie's treatise on his philanthropic views.
The enlightening memoir of the industrialist as famous for his philanthropy as for his fortune. His good friend Mark Twain dubbed him “St. Andrew.” British Prime Minister William Gladstone called him an “example” for the wealthy. Such terms seldom apply to multimillionaires. But Andrew Carnegie was no run-of-the-mill steel magnate. At age 13 and full of dreams, he sailed from his native Dunfermline, Scotland, to America. The story of his success begins with a $1.20-a-week job at a bobbin factory. By the end of his life, he had amassed an unprecedented fortune—and given away more than 90 percent of it for the good of mankind. Here, for the first time in one volume, are two impressive works by Andrew Carnegie himself: his autobiography and “The Gospel of Wealth,” a groundbreaking manifesto on the duty of the wealthy to give back to society all of their fortunes. And he practiced what he preached, erecting 1,600 libraries across the country, founding Carnegie Mellon University, building Carnegie Hall, and performing countless other acts of philanthropy because, as Carnegie wrote, “The man who dies thus rich dies disgraced.” With an Introduction by Gordon Hutner
Andrew Carnegie was a Scottish-American industrialist, business magnate, and philanthropist. He led the expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century. He later became a leading philanthropist in the United States and in the British Empire. Carnegie was born in Scotland, and emigrated to the United States with his parents in 1848. He first worked as a telegrapher, and by the 1860s had investments in railroads, railroad sleeping cars, bridges, and oil derricks. He later built Pittsburgh's Carnegie Steel Company, sold to J. P. Morgan in 1901 for $480 million, which became the U.S. Steel Corporation. After selling Carnegie Steel, he surpassed John D. Rockefeller as the richest American for the next couple of years. His 1889 article proclaiming "The Gospel of Wealth" called on the rich to use their wealth to improve society, and stimulated a wave of philanthropy. Carnegie devoted the remainder of his life to large-scale philanthropy.
Andrew Carnegie ( November 25, 1835 - August 11, 1919) was a Scottish American industrialist who led the expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century, and is often identified as one of the richest people and Americans ever. He built a leadership role as a philanthropist for the United States and the British Empire. During the last 18 years of his life, he gave away to charities, foundations, and universities about $350 million (in 2015 share of GDP, $78.6 billion) - almost 90 percent of his fortune. His 1889 article proclaiming "The Gospel of Wealth" called on the rich to use their wealth to improve society, and it stimulated a wave of philanthropy.
CHAPTER I PARENTS AND CHILDHOOD CHAPTER II DUNFERMLINE AND AMERICA CHAPTER III PITTSBURGH AND WORK CHAPTER IV COLONEL ANDERSON AND BOOKS CHAPTER V THE TELEGRAPH OFFICE CHAPTER VI RAILROAD SERVICE CHAPTER VII SUPERINTENDENT OF THE PENNSYLVANIA CHAPTER VIII CIVIL WAR PERIOD CHAPTER IX BRIDGE-BUILDING CHAPTER X THE IRON WORKS CHAPTER XI NEW YORK AS HEADQUARTERS CHAPTER XII BUSINESS NEGOTIATIONS CHAPTER XIII THE AGE OF STEEL CHAPTER XIV PARTNERS, BOOKS, AND TRAVEL CHAPTER XV COACHING TRIP AND MARRIAGE CHAPTER XVI MILLS AND THE MEN CHAPTER XVII THE HOMESTEAD STRIKE CHAPTER XVIII PROBLEMS OF LABOR CHAPTER XIX THE "GOSPEL OF WEALTH" CHAPTER XX EDUCATIONAL AND PENSION FUNDS CHAPTER XXI THE PEACE PALACE AND PITTENCRIEFF CHAPTER XXII MATHEW ARNOLD AND OTHERS CHAPTER XXIII BRITISH POLITICAL LEADERS CHAPTER XXIV GLADSTONE AND MORLEY CHAPTER XXV HERBERT SPENCER AND HIS DISCIPLE CHAPTER XXVI BLAINE AND HARRISON CHAPTER XXVII WASHINGTON DIPLOMACY CHAPTER XXVIII HAY AND McKINLEY CHAPTER XXIX MEETING THE GERMAN EMPEROR
Andrew Carnegie but commonly or kar-neg-ee; November 25, 1835 - August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American industrialist who led the enormous expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century. He built a leadership role as a philanthropist for the United States and the British Empire. During the last 18 years of his life, he gave away to charities, foundations, and universities about fortune. His 1889 article proclaiming "The Gospel of Wealth" called on the rich to use their wealth to improve society, and it stimulated a wave of philanthropy.

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