Download Free The Autobiography Of Geronimo Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online The Autobiography Of Geronimo and write the review.

The Astonishing Autobiography of One of the Truly Great Native American Leaders. "In the beginning the world was covered with darkness. There was no sun, no day. The perpetual night had no moon or stars." And thus begins the autobiography of Geronimo-with the history of his people. Geronimo's My Story is one of the most unusual autobiographies you will ever read. Yes, you'll learn about the life of this legendary Apache leader. Yes, you'll learn about his battles with both Mexicans and Americans. But you will also learn about the Apache culture-how they were organized, how they raised their children, how they married, their amusements, their customs, even their unwritten laws. In short, this book was Geronimo's chance to finally tell the world the Apache side of the story; and he knew it. But he refused to participate unless he could tell it his way, without anyone changing it. At first, Army officials refused permission for the project. Then, unexpectedly, an order came flashing down the line countermanding that decision. It came directly from the President of the United States.
During 1905 and 1906, Geronimo, the Apache warrior and honorary war chief, dictated his story through a native interpreter to S.M. Barrett, then superintendent of schools in Lawton, Oklahoma. As Geronimo was by then a prisoner of war, Barrett had made appeals all the way up the chain of command to President Teddy Roosevelt for persmission to record the words of the "Indian outlaw." Geronimo came to each interview knowing exactly what he wanted to cover, beginning with his telling of the Apache creation story. --From publisher's description.
The Apache war chief Geronimo's story of his life. Originally published as "Geronimo; His Own Story." Geronimo also describes Apache culture and religion, and pleads for better treatment of his people by the United States.
On September 5, 1886, the entire nation rejoiced as the news flashed from the Southwest that the Apache war leader Geronimo had surrendered to Brigadier General Nelson A. Miles. With Geronimo, at the time of his surrender, were Chief Naiche (the son of the great Cochise), sixteen other warriors, fourteen women, and six children. It had taken a force of 5,000 regular army troops and a series of false promises to "capture" the band. Yet the surrender that day was not the end of the story of the Apaches associated with Geronimo. Besides his small band, 394 of his tribesmen, including his wife and children, were rounded up, loaded into railroad cars, and shipped to Florida. For more than twenty years Geronimo’s people were kept in captivity at Fort Pickens, Florida; Mount Vernon Barracks, Alabama; and finally Fort Sill, Oklahoma. They never gave up hope of returning to their mountain home in Arizona and New Mexico, even as their numbers were reduced by starvation and disease and their children were taken from them to be sent to the Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania.
"Describes the life and times of Geronimo, the Apache warrior"--
This collection presents the incredible life stories of the legendary Native Americans such as: Geronimo, Charles Eastman, Black Hawk, King Philip, Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse. Contents: Charles Eastman: Indian Boyhood & From the Deep Woods to Civilization King Philip: War Chief of the Wampanoag People Geronimo's Story of His Life Autobiography of the Sauk Leader Black Hawk and the History of the Black Hawk War of 1832 Indian Heroes and Great Chieftains
This “meticulous and finely researched” biography tracks the Apache raider’s life from infamous renegade to permanent prisoner of war (Publishers Weekly). Notorious for his ferocity in battle and uncanny ability to elude capture, the Apache fighter Geronimo became a legend in his own time and remains an iconic figure of the nineteenth century American West. In Geronimo, renowned historian Robert M. Utley digs beneath the myths and rumors to produce an authentic and thoroughly researched portrait of the man whose unique talents and human shortcomings swept him into the fierce storms of history. Utley draws on an array of newly available sources, including firsthand accounts and military reports, as well as his geographical expertise and deep knowledge of the conflicts between whites and Native Americans. This highly accurate and vivid narrative unfolds through the alternating perspectives of whites and Apaches, arriving at a more nuanced understanding of Geronimo’s character and motivation than ever before. What was it like to be an Apache fighter-in-training? Why was Geronimo feared by whites and Apaches alike? Why did he finally surrender after remaining free for so long? The answers to these and many other questions fill the pages of this authoritative volume.
Geronimo was a prominent leader and medicine man from the Bedonkohe band of the Chiricahua Apache tribe. From 1850 to 1886 Geronimo joined with members of three other Chiricahua Apache bands—the Tchihende, the Tsokanende and the Nednhi—to carry out numerous raids as well as resistance to US and Mexican military campaigns in the northern Mexico states of Chihuahua and Sonora, and in the southwestern American territories of New Mexico and Arizona. Geronimo's raids and related combat actions were a part of the prolonged period of the Apache–United States conflict, which started with American settlement in Apache lands following the end of the war with Mexico in 1848. Contents: The Apaches Origin of the Apache Indians Subdivisions of the Apache Tribe Early Life Tribal Amusements, Manners, and Customs The Family The Mexicans Kas-ki-yeh Fighting under Difficulties Raids that were Successful Varying Fortunes Other Raids Heavy Fighting Geronimo's Mightiest Battle The White Men Coming of the White Men Greatest of Wrongs Removals In Prison and on the Warpath The Final Struggle Surrender of Geronimo A Prisoner of War The Old and the New Unwritten Laws of the Apaches At the World's Fair Religion Hopes for the Future
Apache warrior Geronimo was a survivor. He spent most of his life fighting soldiers who wanted to take his tribe's lands. His bravery and military skills were widely admired, even by his enemies. This respectful and accessible biography of the Native American leader tells readers about Geronimo's motivations and his dreams for his people. The colorful and inviting format, fact boxes, and historical photographs make this an invaluable book for learning about both Native American and U.S. history.
A biography of the Apache chief who led one of the last great Indian uprisings against the United States Army.
The name "Geronimo" came to Corine Sombrun insistently in a trance during her apprenticeship to a Mongolian shaman. That message and the need to understand its meaning brought her to the home of the legendary Apache leader's great-grandson, Harlyn Geronimo, himself a medicine man on the Mescalero Apache reservation in New Mexico. Together, the two of them—the French seeker and the Native American healer—would make a pilgrimage that retraced Geronimo's life while following the course of the Gila River to the place of his birth, at its source. Told in the alternating voices of its authors, In Geronimo's Footsteps is the record of that journey. At its core is an account of Geronimo's life, from his earliest days in a Chiricahua Apache family and his path as a warrior and chief to his surrender and the years spent in exile until his death, at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Recounted by his great-grandson, his story is steeped in family history and Apache lore to create a portrait of a leader intent on defending his people and their land and traditions—a mission that Harlyn continues, even as he campaigns to recover his ancestor's bones from the U.S. government. Completing Corine's circle, the book also explores the links, genetic and possibly cultural, between the Apache and the people of Mongolia.
Geronimo was a prominent leader of the Bedonkohe Apache Indians who became known for leading resistance efforts against troops in Mexico and Arizona in the late 19th century. This historical biography explores Native American history through this fascinating figure’s life. This text was written to support elementary social studies standards, encouraging readers to draw conclusions and connections about important historical topics. Geronimo’s story comes to life through historical photographs and primary sources, while sidebars and a timeline complete a comprehensive learning experience.
Presents the life and accomplishments of the Apache leader who was caught between tribal traditions and new settlers' encroachment into Apache territory.
Britton Davis's account of the controversial "Geronimo Campaign" of 1885–86 offers an important firsthand picture of the famous Chiricahua warrior and the men who finally forced his surrender. Davis knew most of the people involved in the campaign and was himself in charge of Indian scouts, some of whom helped hunt down the small band of fugitives Robert M. Utley's foreword reevaluates the account for the modern reader and establishes its his torical background.
A biography of the famous Apache warrior who fought for the right of Native Americans to live and roam freely on their homeland.
Examines the life of the Apache chief Geronimo, who led one of the last Indian uprisings.
Presents the life of the famed Apache warrior Geronimo, from his youth and the tragic massacre of his family to his vengeful actions against the unfaithful American government in retaliation for their cruelty to his people.
"Through the stories of the elders, he also learned how this way of life had changed since their capture, as many of the traditional ways of the Chiricahuas were altered or lost in the ensuing decades after Geronimo's people surrendered to the U.S. Army in 1886. Decades of incarceration followed - first in Florida, then in Alabama, and finally in Oklahoma. More than half died in hot, humid prison camps because the Chiricahuas had no inborn resistance to the virulent diseases brought to North America by Europeans. Then in 1913, with fewer than three hundred left, the Chiricahuas were released and received land allotments near their last prison site, Fort Sill, or on the Mescalero Apache Reservation where Ove arrived thirty-five years later."--BOOK JACKET.
In the late 1870s Geronimo, a medicine man, emerged as a brilliant Chiricahua leader and fiercely resisted his people's incarceration on inhospitable federal reservations. His fight for freedom, often bloody, in New Mexico, Arizona, and Mexico triggered the deployment of hundreds of United States and Mexican troops and Apache Scouts to hunt him and his people. In the end, the United States Army recalled Gatewood to Apache service, ordering him into the Sierra Madre of northern Mexico to locate Geronimo and negotiate his band's surrender.
"Since his initial appearance in the press in 1877, Geronimo has seldom been absent from public attention. This book explores the ways in which the famous Chiricahua Apache has been represented in various media, including literature, film, music, and photography. It also examines Geronimo's manipulation of his own image during his time as prisoner of war"--Provided by publisher.

Best Books