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An architect s gripping account of living and working in war-torn Syria, and the role architecture plays in whether a community crumbles or comes together"
'We may be about to see a new country - indeed, two new countries, - emerging on these islands. Half a lifetime ago, I sat down to write this book as a work of history. As it's aged, it's become current affairs.' Just twenty years ago it seemed impossible that Scotland would ever get home rule, let alone full independence. Yet very soon there will be a Scottish referendum which will not only decide on this matter but which will have profound consequences for the future of all people on these islands. In The Battle for Scotland, first published in 1992, Andrew Marr provides the historical backdrop to these extraordinary events. He attempts to explain the deep sources of Scottish national feeling and the political will which has brought us to this deeply uncertain time. And in a substantial new introduction, Marr considers how we got here so suddenly, what the stakes really are and what the questions every voting Scot (and every non-voting UK citizen) will be asking themselves. Andrew Marr was born in Glasgow. He graduated from Cambridge University and has enjoyed a long career in political journalism, working for the Scotsman, the Independent , the Economist, the Express and the Observer. From 2000 to 2005 he was the BBC's Political Editor. Andrew's broadcasting includes series on contemporary thinkers for BBC 2 and Radio 4, political documentaries for Channel 4 and BBC Panorama, and Radio 4's 'Start The Week'.
This is the second book in a series of two, covering the events at sea during the German invasion of Norway in 1940, the first modern campaign in which sea, air and ground forces interacted decisively. Part one covers the events at sea off southern and western Norway where Norwegian and British forces attempted to halt the German advance out of the invasion ports as well as the stream of supplies and reinforcements across the Skagerrak. The second part focuses on the British landings in Central Norway where the Royal Navy for the first time had its mastery challenged by air superiority from land-based aircraft. Part three covers the events in and around Narvik where Norwegian, British, French and Polish naval, air and land forces were engaged in the first combined amphibious landings of WW II. Part four sums up the events during the evacuation in June, in which the first carrier task force operations of the war, including the loss of the carrier Glorious, figure prominently. As in the first volume, the narration shifts continuously between the strategic and operational issues, and the experiences of the officers and ratings living through the events. Extensive research and use of primary sources reveals the many sides of this war, some of which remain controversial to this day.
The islands of Britain have been a crossroads of gods, heroes, and kings-those of flesh as well as those of myth-for thousands of years. Successive waves of invasion brought distinctive legends, rites, and beliefs. The ancient Celts displaced earlier indigenous peoples, only to find themselves displaced in turn by the Romans, who then abandoned the islands to Germanic tribes, a people themselves nearly overcome in time by an influx of Scandinavians. With each wave of invaders came a battle for the mythic mind of the Isles as the newcomer's belief system met with the existing systems of gods, legends, and myths. In Gods, Heroes, and Kings, medievalist Christopher Fee and veteran myth scholar David Leeming unearth the layers of the British Isles' unique folkloric tradition to discover how this body of seemingly disparate tales developed. The authors find a virtual battlefield of myths in which pagan and Judeo-Christian beliefs fought for dominance, and classical, Anglo-Saxon, Germanic, and Celtic narrative threads became tangled together. The resulting body of legends became a strange but coherent hybrid, so that by the time Chaucer wrote "The Wife of Bath's Tale" in the fourteenth century, a Christian theme of redemption fought for prominence with a tripartite Celtic goddess and the Arthurian legends of Sir Gawain-itself a hybrid mythology. Without a guide, the corpus of British mythology can seem impenetrable. Taking advantage of the latest research, Fee and Leeming employ a unique comparative approach to map the origins and development of one of the richest folkloric traditions. Copiously illustrated with excerpts in translation from the original sources, Gods, Heroes, and Kings provides a fascinating and accessible new perspective on the history of British mythology.
Simma was sure she'd never see Sami again. Sef or Glyn, either. She'd left Sami standing in the middle of the street in First Right nearly a year ago, and the boys had vanished without a trace long before that, or were chased from the tunnel by the Judge. Living under the water in tunnel Tee Two, with her mom and her mom’s boyfriend, Namid, frightened Simma no end. Any moment, she felt, the walls would split and the whole of the mile-wide river would rush in and drown her. Namid said she'd outgrow it but she was nearly sixteen and this feeling of dread only deepened in her. Then Sami came, as if in a dream, and told her to run! Through a catastrophe brought on by the sabotage of the hated Judge Trapmann, Simma falls in with a crowd of survivors bent on revenge against his cannibal army. She liked a good fight, especially when it meant bringing down a bully, but Sami told her to push on, and it was up to Simma to warn the Twelve Towns. War was coming and worlds were at stake! THE BATTLE FOR NORMAL is a story of courage and discovery in an age of reconstruction, and is the third book in the Water Worlds sci-fi adventure series, chronicling the terraforming of the inner worlds of the Solar System as seen through the eyes of generations of young women. Seven books are planned for the series.
Amber can hardly believe her luck. She has a new job, great friends, no parents and has even managed to find the time to date. Incredibly, The Magic Lands are reasonably peaceful. Or are they? With Morrigan around trouble is never far away. Why does Amber seem to be having more close calls than usual? Who is the mysterious figure in black? And why is The Protector ignoring all the signs that say trouble is brewing? It's not long before Amber realizes that by ignoring her instincts, she's not only risking her own safety but also the lives and freedom of everyone in The Magic Lands.

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