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The Coast of Utopia is an epic but also intimate drama of romantics and revolutionaries in an age of emperors. The three sequential, self-contained plays, Voyage, Shipwreck and Salvage, span the lives and loves of a group of Russian friends at home and abroad in the tumultuous years between 1833 and 1866. This new fully revised edition of the trilogy contains an introduction by the author.
Shipwreck is the second part of Tom Stoppard's trilogy The Coast of Utopia. It continues the story of the anarchist Michael Bakunin, the critic Vissarion Belinsky, the writer Ivan Turgenev, and their circle, but as the action shifts from Russia to Paris in the year of European revolution, it is Alexander Herzen and his wife Natalie who come to occupy the focus. Isaiah Berlin called Herzen a writer and thinker of genius, one of the greatest of nineteenth-century Russians; and it was here, in the intoxicating anticipation and the dashed hopes of the 1848 revolution - when the loss of his political illusions were overshadowed by a series of personal calamities - that Herzen found his greatness, seeking the way forward for Russia, the just society and the good life.
Voyage is the first part of Tom Stoppard's trilogy The Coast of Utopia, an epic but also intimate drama of romantics and revolutionaries in an age of emperors. Beginning in 1833, Voyage takes up the story of the future anarchist Michael Bakunin when his stage was still Premukhino, the Bakunin family estate, and Moscow under the repressive rule of Tsar Nicolas I, and when Michael and his four sisters, like many upper-class Russians of their generation, were in the thrall of German idealistic philosophy. 'I knew there were families,' remarks his friend, the brilliant young critic Vissarion Belinsky. 'I come from a family. But I had no idea.' But family life, with its passionate ties and conflagrations, all in the cause of exalted love and idealism, is left behind for ever when Michael at the age of twenty-six sets sail for Germany, waved goodbye by his newest friend, the first self-proclaimed socialist in Russian history, Alexander Herzen: the move from pure thought to revolutionary action is on the horizon.
Voyage is the first part of Tom Stoppard's trilogy The Coast of Utopia, an epic but also intimate drama of romantics and revolutionaries in an age of emperors. Beginning in 1833, Voyage takes up the story of the future anarchist Michael Bakunin when his stage was still Premukhino, the Bakunin family estate, and Moscow under the repressive rule of Tsar Nicolas I, and when Michael and his four sisters, like many upper-class Russians of their generation, were in the thrall of German idealistic philosophy. 'I knew there were families,' remarks his friend, the brilliant young critic Vissarion Belinsky. 'I come from a family. But I had no idea.' But family life, with its passionate ties and conflagrations, all in the cause of exalted love and idealism, is left behind for ever when Michael at the age of twenty-six sets sail for Germany, waved goodbye by his newest friend, the first self-proclaimed socialist in Russian history, Alexander Herzen: the move from pure thought to revolutionary action is on the horizon.
"Voyage" is the first part of "The Coast of Utopia, " Stoppard's long-awaited and monumental trilogy that explores a group of friends who came of age under the Tsarist autocracy of Nicholas I, and for whom the term intelligentsia was coined.
A Study Guide for Tom Stoppard's "The Coast of Utopia," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Literary News For Students.This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Literary News For Students for all of your research needs.
Salvage is the final part of Tom Stoppard's trilogy The Coast of Utopia. It is 1852. Alexander Herzen, who left Russia five years earlier, has arrived in London in retreat from a series of public and private calamities. Revolution in Europe has hit the rocks. 'I have lost every illusion dear to me,' he says. 'I'm forty. The world will hear no more of me.' But émigré circles in London (including Karl Marx) are buzzing with plots and intrigues, and Herzen's money, as well as his sardonic wit, soon have an outlet among them. With the accession of Alexander II, 'the Reforming Tsar', Herzen's revived spirits are boosted by the arrival of his childhood friend Nicholas Ogarev with his wife Natalie. Their journal 'The Bell', smuggled into Russia, enters its heyday in the struggle for the emancipation of the serfs. Will it be reform from above or revolution from below? At home the 'new men' who once looked on Herzen as their inspiration are in a hurry, and in London he is once more at odds with Michael Bakunin, who has escaped from exile in Siberia. Meanwhile Natalie Ogarev finds in him her romantic ideal, and Herzen's public and private travails are far from over.
Publikace představuje specifický typ dramatické postavy, pojmenovaný „nový posel“, kterého lze chápat jako následovníka konvenčního typu postavy známé z tradičních dramat nejčastěji jako „posel“. Přítomnost posla v tradičním dramatu má určité funkce, které plní i nový posel. Toho však odlišuje fakt, že se nejedná o samostatnou postavu, ale jeho roli v současném anglicky psaném mainstreamovém dramatu přejímá některá z hlavních postav. Mezi takové postavy patří především rozliční novináři či reportéři, politici či jejich asistenti, vědci či učitelé, detektivové či policisté, historické postavy, filozofové a literární vědci atd. Publikace v konkrétních případech analyzuje dramata dvou britských dramatiků, Michaela Frayna a Toma Stopparda, a afroamerického dramatika Augusta Wilsona.
The dramatic trilogy has been flourishing for some time now in new works and revivals of older works by American, British, and European playwrights. This book analyzes recent American works by Caucasian, African American, Asian American, and Hispanic American men and women. There are five chapters beginning with Opposing Families (trilogies of, e.g., Lanford Wilson, Foote, Machado, and McCraney are examined). Carson, Rabe, and McLaughlin are among those in the Classical Reimaginings chapter while Coen, Berc, and Wolfe constitute the Medieval Reimaginings chapter. Van Itallie, Havis, Rapp, and Hwang, among others, create New Forms. LaBute, Fierstein, and Nelson, among others, create New Selves. The concluding chapter is devoted to Ruhl’s Passion Play, which spans 400 years of theatre-creating from Elizabethan England to Hitler’s Germany to the Reagan era in America.
This book offers an extended analysis of writers and theatre companies in Britain since 1995, and explores them alongside recent cultural, social and political developments. Referencing well-known practitioners from modern theatre, this book is an excelle
The use of film and video is widespread in contemporary theatre. Staging the Screen explores a variety of productions, ranging from Piscator to Forced Entertainment, charting the impact of developing technologies on practices in dramaturgy and performance. Giesekam addresses critical issues raised by multi-media work and inter-media work
A comprehensive, five-volume set, Concise Major 21st-Century Writers profiles today's most outstanding and widely known writers. Clearly written in an easy-to-use format, it collects detailed biographical and bibliographical information on approximately 700 authors who are most often studied in college and high school.
A collection of six rarely performed radio plays by one of the world's foremost contemporary dramatists
In a large country house in Derbyshire in April 1809 sits Lady Thomasina Coverly, aged thirteen, and her tutor, Septimus Hodge. Through the window may be seen some of the '500 acres inclusive of lake' where Capability Brown's idealized landscape is about to give way to the 'picturesque' Gothic style: 'everything but vampires', as the garden historian Hannah Jarvis remarks to Bernard Nightingale when they stand in the same room 180 years later. Bernard has arrived to uncover the scandal which is said to have taken place when Lord Byron stayed at Sidley Park. Tom Stoppard's absorbing play takes us back and forth between the centuries and explores the nature of truth and time, the difference between the Classical and the Romantic temperament, and the disruptive influence of sex on our orbits in life - 'the attraction', as Hannah says, 'which Newton left out'.
With a writing career spanning over half a century and encompassing media as diverse as conferences, radio, journalism, fiction, theatre, film, and television, Tom Stoppard is probably the most prolific and significant living British dramatist. The critical essays in this volume celebrating Stoppard’s 75th birthday address many facets of Stoppard’s work, both the well-known, such as Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead and Shakespeare in Love, as well as the relatively critically neglected, including his novel Lord Malquist and Mr. Moon and his short stories, “The Story,” “Life, Times: Fragments,” and “Reunion.” The essays presented here analyze plays such as Arcadia, The Invention of Love, The Real Thing, and Jumpers, Stoppard’s film adaptation of J. G. Ballard’s Empire of the Sun, his television adaptation of Ford Madox Ford’s Parade’s End, and his stage adaptations of Chekhov’s plays Ivanov, The Seagull, and The Cherry Orchard, as well as his own theatrical trilogy on Russian history, The Coast of Utopia (Voyage, Shipwreck, and Salvage). Also included is an interview with Tom Stoppard on the 16 November 1982 debut of his play The Real Thing at Strand Theatre, London, and a detailed account of the Stoppard holdings in the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin. From his fascination with Shakespeare and other historical figures (and time periods) to his exploration of the connection between poetic creativity and scholarship to his predilection for word play, verbal ambiguity and use of anachronism, Stoppard’s work is at once insightful and wry, thought-provoking and entertaining, earnest and facetious. The critical essays in this volume hope to do justice to the brilliant complexity that is Tom Stoppard’s body of work.
Selected contributions to the most prestigious international event in Shakespeare studies, the Ninth World Shakespeare Congress (2011), represent major trends in the field in historical and present-day contexts. Special attention is given to the impact of Shakespeare on diverse cultures, from the Native Americans to China and Japan.
This was the first time I felt as involved in film as in working in theatre. My immersion in Parade’s End from the writing to the finishing touches took up the time I might have given to writing my own play but, perhaps to an unwarranted degree, I think of this Parade’s End as mine, such was the illusion of proprietorship over Ford’s characters and story. —Tom Stoppard, from the Introduction Tom Stoppard’s BBC / HBO dramatization of Ford Madox Ford’s masterwork takes a prominent place in the ranks of his oeuvre. Parade's End is the reinvention of a masterwork of modernist English literature produced by one of the most critically acclaimed and respected writers working today. Parade’s End is the story of Christopher Tietjens, the “last Tory,” his beautiful, disconcerting wife Sylvia, and the virginal young suffragette Valentine Wannop: an upper class love triangle before and during the Great War. Parade's End is a three-part drama, directed by the BAFTA-winning Susanna White, and featuring internationally renowned actors including Benedict Cumberbatch, Rebecca Hall, and Adelaide Clemens. This edition includes bonus scenes which were not broadcast, an introductory essay by Stoppard, and a selection of stills from the production as well as photographs taken on location.
Liubov Ranevskya, a widowed landowner returns home more or less insolvent after five years abroad. Everything appears just as she remembers it but hers is a diminishing world. The vast and beautiful cherry orchard is soon to be sold off against her mounting debts.The insistent warnings of Lopakhin, a peasant's son turned wealthy businessman, go unheeded, and more than the family estate is sacrificed:as Trofimov, the "eternal student" who hopes to inherit the future, tells her, "The whole of Russia is our orchard". Chekhov's last play (1904) is a poignant snapshot of the great, slow-rolling change that came to a head with the Russian revolution in 1917. Tom Stoppard's English version of Chekhov's The Cherry Orchard had its first New York performance at the Harvey Theater, Brooklyn in January 2009, and its first London performance at the Old Vic Theatre in May 2009.
I can't remember which side I'm supposed to be working for, and it is not in fact necessary for me to know. The Cold War is approaching its endgame and somebody in spymaster Elizabeth Hapgood's network is leaking secrets. Is her star double agent really a triple? The trap she sets becomes a hall of mirrors in which betrayal is personal and treachery a trick of the light. Tom Stoppard's Hapgood premiered at the Aldwych Theatre, London, in March 1988. It was revived at the Hampstead Theatre, London, in December 2015.

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