Download Free The Code Book The Science Of Secrecy From Ancient Egypt To Quantum Cryptography Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online The Code Book The Science Of Secrecy From Ancient Egypt To Quantum Cryptography and write the review.

In his first book since the bestselling Fermat's Enigma, Simon Singh offers the first sweeping history of encryption, tracing its evolution and revealing the dramatic effects codes have had on wars, nations, and individual lives. From Mary, Queen of Scots, trapped by her own code, to the Navajo Code Talkers who helped the Allies win World War II, to the incredible (and incredibly simple) logisitical breakthrough that made Internet commerce secure, The Code Book tells the story of the most powerful intellectual weapon ever known: secrecy. Throughout the text are clear technical and mathematical explanations, and portraits of the remarkable personalities who wrote and broke the world's most difficult codes. Accessible, compelling, and remarkably far-reaching, this book will forever alter your view of history and what drives it. It will also make you wonder how private that e-mail you just sent really is.
Provides young adults with a review of cryptography, its evolution over time, and its purpose throughout history from the era of Julius Caesar to the modern day.
The Science of Secrecy from Ancient Egypt to Quantum Cryptography From the best-selling author of Fermat’s Last Theorem, The Code Book is a history of man’s urge to uncover the secrets of codes, from Egyptian puzzles to modern day computer encryptions.
How to make it, break it, hack it, crack it. The secret history of codes and code breaking. Simon Singh’s best-selling title The Code Book now re-issued for the young-adult market.
This book provides the basic theory, techniques, and algorithms of modern cryptography that are applicable to network and cyberspace security. It consists of the following nine main chapters: Chapter 1 provides the basic concepts and ideas of cyberspace and cyberspace security, Chapters 2 and 3 provide an introduction to mathematical and computational preliminaries, respectively. Chapters 4 discusses the basic ideas and system of secret-key cryptography, whereas Chapters 5, 6, and 7 discuss the basic ideas and systems of public-key cryptography based on integer factorization, discrete logarithms, and elliptic curves, respectively. Quantum-safe cryptography is presented in Chapter 8 and offensive cryptography, particularly cryptovirology, is covered in Chapter 9. This book can be used as a secondary text for final-year undergraduate students and first-year postgraduate students for courses in Computer, Network, and Cyberspace Security. Researchers and practitioners working in cyberspace security and network security will also find this book useful as a reference.
When Practical Unix Security was first published more than a decade ago, it became an instant classic. Crammed with information about host security, it saved many a Unix system administrator from disaster. The second edition added much-needed Internet security coverage and doubled the size of the original volume. The third edition is a comprehensive update of this very popular book - a companion for the Unix/Linux system administrator who needs to secure his or her organization's system, networks, and web presence in an increasingly hostile world.Focusing on the four most popular Unix variants today--Solaris, Mac OS X, Linux, and FreeBSD--this book contains new information on PAM (Pluggable Authentication Modules), LDAP, SMB/Samba, anti-theft technologies, embedded systems, wireless and laptop issues, forensics, intrusion detection, chroot jails, telephone scanners and firewalls, virtual and cryptographic filesystems, WebNFS, kernel security levels, outsourcing, legal issues, new Internet protocols and cryptographic algorithms, and much more.Practical Unix & Internet Security consists of six parts: Computer security basics: introduction to security problems and solutions, Unix history and lineage, and the importance of security policies as a basic element of system security. Security building blocks: fundamentals of Unix passwords, users, groups, the Unix filesystem, cryptography, physical security, and personnel security. Network security: a detailed look at modem and dialup security, TCP/IP, securing individual network services, Sun's RPC, various host and network authentication systems (e.g., NIS, NIS+, and Kerberos), NFS and other filesystems, and the importance of secure programming. Secure operations: keeping up to date in today's changing security world, backups, defending against attacks, performing integrity management, and auditing. Handling security incidents: discovering a break-in, dealing with programmed threats and denial of service attacks, and legal aspects of computer security. Appendixes: a comprehensive security checklist and a detailed bibliography of paper and electronic references for further reading and research. Packed with 1000 pages of helpful text, scripts, checklists, tips, and warnings, this third edition remains the definitive reference for Unix administrators and anyone who cares about protecting their systems and data from today's threats.
During and after the English civil wars, between 1640 and 1690, an unprecedented number of manuals teaching cryptography were published, almost all for the general public. While there are many surveys of cryptography, none pay any attention to the volume of manuals that appeared during the seventeenth century, or provide any cultural context for the appearance, design, or significance of the genre during the period. On the contrary, when the period’s cryptography writings are mentioned, they are dismissed as esoteric, impractical, and useless. Yet, as this book demonstrates, seventeenth-century cryptography manuals show us one clear beginning of the capitalization of information. In their pages, intelligence—as private message and as mental ability—becomes a central commodity in the emergence of England’s capitalist media state. Publications boasting the disclosure of secrets had long been popular, particularly for English readers with interests in the occult, but it was during these particular decades of the seventeenth century that cryptography emerged as a permanent bureaucratic function for the English government, a fashionable activity for the stylish English reader, and a respected discipline worthy of its own genre. These manuals established cryptography as a primer for intelligence, a craft able to identify and test particular mental abilities deemed "smart" and useful for England’s financial future. Through close readings of five specific primary texts that have been ignored not only in cryptography scholarship but also in early modern literary, scientific, and historical studies, this book allows us to see one origin of disciplinary division in the popular imagination and in the university, when particular broad fields—the sciences, the mechanical arts, and the liberal arts—came to be viewed as more or less profitable.

Best Books