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A comprehensive visual survey of the ancient city draws on cutting-edge architectural research to reconstruct the latest beliefs about Pompeii's history, discussing such topics as the lives and deaths of its citizens, its political and religious structures, and its destruction by the eruption of AD 79.
The legions of Rome were among the greatest fighting forces in history. For almost half a millennium they secured the known world under the power of the Caesars. This pioneering account gathers together the stories of each and every imperial legion, telling the tales of their triumphs and defeats as they policed the empire and enlarged its borders. Focusing on the legions as the core of the Roman army, and chronicling their individual histories in detail, this volume builds on the thematic account of the Roman military force given by its companion The Complete Roman Army , and is vital reading for anyone who has enjoyed that book.
The resonant ruins of Pompeii are perhaps the most direct route back to the living, breathing world of the ancient Romans. Two million visitors annually now walk the paved streets which re-emerged, miraculously preserved, from their layers of volcanic ash. Yet for all the fame and unique importance of the site, there is a surprising lack of a handy archaeological guide in English to reveal and explain its public spaces and private residences. This compact and user-friendly handbook, written by an expert in the field, helpfully fills that gap. Illustrated throughout with maps, plans, diagrams and other images, Pompeii: An Archaeological Guide offers a general introduction to the doomed city followed by an authoritative summary and survey of the buildings, artefacts and paintings themselves. The result is an unrivalled picture, derived from an intimate knowledge of Roman archaeology around the Bay of Naples, of the forum, temples, brothels, bath-houses, bakeries, gymnasia, amphitheatre, necropolis and other site buildings - including perennial favourites like the House of the Faun, named after its celebrated dancing satyr.
The morning of August 24, AD 79, seemed like any other in the Roman city of Pompeii. So no one was prepared when the nearby volcano Mount Vesuvius suddenly erupted, spouting ash that buried the city and its inhabitants. The disaster left thousands dead, and Pompeii was no more than a memory for almost 1,700 years. In 1748, explorers rediscovered the port city with intact buildings and beautiful mosaics. This easy-to-read account is gripping and includes photos of the ruins.
A collection of essays exploring the different ways in which the ruined city of Pompeii has been a major source of inspiration to Western imaginations. Creative and popular, as well as scholarly approaches are covered, including an interview with the novelist Robert Harris, and the volume is fully illustrated, with several images in full colour.
COLORFUL CHARACTERS TUMBLE FROM THE PAGES AS POMPEII LIVES AGAIN. A.D. 59. Nero, a corrupt and narcissistic sadist rules the Roman Empire. Eventually, tired of the Emperor’s determination to destroy the social and political fabric of Roman life, a group of senators, praetorians and courtiers conspire to assassinate him. Pompeii is a city of secrets with a reputation for wealth, leisure and the good life. Culturally rich and oozing energy, it exudes a zest for living unmatched by Rome’s cold, corrupt magnificence. Murder and revenge will fuel support for the conspiracy, from those Pompeians with every reason to despise Nero. And Pompeii hides another secret. What is the mystery of the villa with the room of the crimson frescoes? Rome’s Empress, Poppaea, born in Pompeii, struggles to cope with Nero’s madness, her political ambitions, and her longing for a glamorous lover hidden in a villa in nearby Oplontis. Through the novel’s pages walks Praxus, a praetorian guard. His inner struggle between decency and his oath to a murderous Emperor, represents the core of goodness that remains inherent in Roman society.
You're no idiot, of course. The battle scenes in Gladiator had you on the edge of your seat and wondering where you could find more information on the rise and fall of ancient Rome. But, so far, your search has left you feeling like a blundering barbarian. Pick yourself up off the Colisseum floor! Consult 'The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Roman Empire', a fun-to-read introduction to the fascinating history, people, and culture of Ancient Rome. In this Complete Idiot's Guide, you get: -The history of the Roman Empire's rise and fall. -An idiot-proof introduction to the great epic literature of the Roman Republic. -A survey of the Romans in arts and popular culture. -Fascinating details of some of history's most nefarious emperors, including Nero, Caligula, and Commodus.
A literary tour-de-force of power, guilt and obsession - two people stalk each other through the shadowy, tangled web of the past - man and woman caught in a dangerous game of confession, each partly predator and partly prey... 'It has been almost fifteen years. I've thought about you often, mostly unkindly. But there: I have thought about you.' Nearly twenty years after Vita broke off contact with Royce, he writes to her, determined to excavate the past. He is older than her, a ghost from her university days, a former benefactor she has tried hard to forget. In his own youth, Royce spent two fateful summers working on a dig in Pompeii with a woman he would later memorialize with a scholarship - the same one that Vita eventually received. From opposite sides of the world, Royce and Vita enter into an adversarial dance: an attempt to settle old accounts. Profoundly addictive and unsettling, In the Garden of the Fugitives is a thrilling psychological examination of what happens when the lines are blurred between victim and predator, between loyalty and obsession. Praise for Ceridwen Dovey 'Strange and richly imagined, haunting and atmospheric... [Dovey] unflinchingly illuminates human nature' The New York Times onOnly the Animals 'Painfully beautiful, heartbreaking and riveting... Dovey voices the uncomfortable, she speaks the unspeakable... An ambitious book with a fable-like surface and a whole churning world beneath' Guardian onOnly the Animals
This volume explores the creation of 'written spaces' through the accretion of monumental inscriptions and non-official graffiti in the Latin-speaking West between c.200 BC and AD 300. The shift to an epigraphic culture demonstrates new mentalities regarding the use of language, the relationship between local elites and the population, and between local elites and the imperial power. The creation of both official and non-official inscriptions is one of the most recognisable facets of the Roman city. The chapters of this book consider why urban populations created these written spaces and how these spaces in turn affected those urban civilisations. They also examine how these inscriptions interacted to create written spaces that could inculcate a sense of 'Roman-ness' into urban populations whilst also acting as a means of differentiating communities from each other. The volume includes new approaches to the study of political entities, social institutions, graffiti and painting, and the differing trajectories of written spaces in the cities of Roman Africa, Italy, Spain and Gaul.
This all embracing survey of Pompeii provides the most comprehensive survey of the region available. With contributions by well-known experts in the field, this book studies not only Pompeii, but also – for the first time – the buried surrounding cities of Campania. The World of Pompeii includes the latest understanding of the region, based on the up-to-date findings of recent archaeological work. Accompanied by a CD with the most detailed map of Pompeii so far, this book is instrumental in studying the city in the ancient world and is an excellent source book for students of this fascinating and tragic geographic region.
Based on the 4-volume work originally edited by the Niccolinis and published in Naples 1854-1896.

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