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Americans now enjoy vastly more privacy than in the past. But privacy makes it difficult to know much about other people; more privacy means more strangers. "The Costs of Privacy "begins with these questions: How, in an anonymous society of strangers, is trust possible? What enables both individuals and institutional actors to trust others whom they have never met and do not know? Nock suggests an answer: that "surveillance "establishes reputations, and it is these which permit us to trust strangers. Simply put, actors are willing to trust those whose reputations justify that trust. Not only does surveillance establish reputations, but it also maintains them among strangers. Nock defines such surveillance functionally, as overt and conspicuous forms of "credentials (e.g., "credit cards, educational degrees, drivers' licenses) and/or "ordeals (e.g., "lie detector tests, drug tests, integrity tests). He shows that the use of credentials and ordeals, over time, is correlated with the number of strangers in our society. Anonymity, then, is one of the costs of greater personal privacy; surveillance is another, offsetting cost. Older methods of surveillance have long been staples of our society. The concluding chapter focuses on newer methods of surveillance, those which can record genetic and biochemical information about people. Unlike traditional bases of reputation, genetic information makes it possible to predict future physical illnesses, mental health problems, and various types of behavior. These new forms of surveillance may seem attractive because they make it possible for actors to enter into risky relationships with many more people (i.e., trust them) without ever getting to know them. In so doing, we may be altering the nature of our public life. And that, argues Nock, may be the greatest cost of privacy.
Does your organization have a good or bad reputation, and who takes responsibility for it? Whether viewed as an intangible asset or potential liability, damage to reputation can be costly. In the private sector loss of investor confidence can dent corporate value; in the public sector loss of public trust can lead to political change. How can anyone protect reputation from damage?
When we lead, particularly when we lead in ministry, we get to make a difference in this world. Our hope is to see lives changed for the better, to impact the lives of the people around us. Because our vision is filled with good intention, we often aspire to fill the role of hero. But what happens when our good intentions and our faithfulness to God's calling leaves us disliked, even targeted? What do we do when the right call disappoints the people who we mean to serve? The truth is that Jesus was not hailed as a hero by the influencers of His time. Good leadership means getting comfortable operating in a new category: Righteous Villain.
Why did the financial scandals really happen? Why are they continuing to happen? In The Death of Corporate Reputation, Yale's Jonathan Macey reveals the real, non-intuitive reason, and offers a new path forward. For over a century law firms, investment banks, accounting firms, credit rating agencies and companies seeking regular access to U.S. capital markets made large investments in their reputations. They treated customers well and sometimes endured losses in transactions or business deals in order to sustain and nurture their reputations as faithful brokers and “gate-keepers.” This has changed completely . The existing business model among leading participants in today’s capital markets no longer treats customers as valued clients whose trust must be earned and nurtured, but as one-off “counter-parties” to whom no duties are owed and no loyalty is required . The rough and tumble norms of the market-place have replaced the long-standing reputational model in U.S. finance. This book describes the transformation in American finance from the old reputational model to the existing laissez faire model and argues that the change came as a result of three factors: (1) the growth of reliance on regulation rather than reputation as the primary mechanism for protecting customers and (2) the increasing complexity of regulation, which made technical expertise rather than reputation the primary criterion on which customers choose who to do business with in today’s markets ; and (3) the rise of the “cult of personality” on Wall Street, which has led to a secular demise in the relevance of companies’ reputations and the concomitant rise of individual “rain-makers” reputation as the basis for premium pricing of financial services. This compelling book will drive the debate about the financial crisis and financial regulation for years to come -- both inside and outside the industry.
A survey showed that in the US senior CEOs spent 65 percent of their time in organized communications. The more successful the company the more time they spent: the CEO is really the senior PR officer. Whether it's investor relations, legal or environmental accountability, ethical issues, employee care or customer service, the media's spotlight will home in on any company that appears to be in breach of its corporate duty. Nobody can hide: the giants and little boys alike must actively manage their reputation. Full of real-life experiences, practical advice and the candid views of top executives, this edition shows how to: build a corporate reputation that becomes the company; avoid disasters that could close the company; win favourable media coverage; recruit the right PR people; set objectives everyone can understand; control the costs of the programme; measure the PR results; and much more.
This unique book written by four world leaders in reputation research, presents the latest cutting-edge thinking on organizational improvement. It covers media management, crisis management, the use of logos and other aspects of corporate identity, and argues the case for reputation management as a way of overseeing long-term organizational strategy. It presents a new approach to managing reputation, one that relies on surveying customers and employees on their view of the corporate character and in harmonizing the values of both. This approach has been trialled in a number of organizations and here the authors demonstrate how improving reputation, merely by learning more about what a company is already doing, is worth some five per cent sales growth. The book is a vital, up to date resource for specialists in corporate communication, public relations, marketing, HRM, and business strategy as well as for all senior management. Highly illustrated with over eighty diagrams and tables, it includes up to the minute illustrative case studies and interviews with leading authorities in the field.
Reputation In Artificial Societies discusses the role of reputation in the achievement of social order. The book proposes that reputation is an agent property that results from transmission of beliefs about how the agents are evaluated with regard to a socially desirable conduct. This desirable conduct represents one or another of the solutions to the problem of social order and may consist of cooperation or altruism, reciprocity, or norm obedience. Reputation In Artificial Societies distinguishes between image (direct evaluation of others) and reputation (propagating meta­belief, indirectly acquired) and investigates their effects with regard to both natural and electronic societies. The interplay between image and reputation, the processes leading to them and the set of decisions that agents make on their basis are demonstrated with supporting data from agent­based simulations.
This book argues that national and international courts seek to enhance their reputations through the strategic exercise of judicial power. Courts often cannot enforce their judgments and must rely on reputational sanctions to ensure compliance. One way to do this is for courts to improve their reputation for generating compliance with their judgments. When the court's reputation is increased, parties will be expected to comply with its judgments and the reputational sanction on a party that fails to comply will be higher. This strategy allows national and international courts, which cannot enforce their judgments against states and executives, to improve the likelihood that their judgments will be complied with over time. This book describes the judicial tactics that courts use to shape their judgments in ways that maximize their reputational gains.
Corporate Reputation Decoded is the first book of its kind that traces the journey of Indian companies in building corporate reputation (CR). The book addresses CR in the Indian context and is in response to the growing interest of companies in this area. The book explains the process of building, maintaining and strategising for CR. It also discusses various aspects of CR—company’s stakeholders, situations demanding CR interventions, and the impact of a company’s culture, ethics and leadership on its CR. The book expounds on these using Indian cases (Tata, Infosys, HUL, Reliance, Aditya Birla Group, HDFC, among others), which enhance the understanding of CR in India as well as benchmark CR best practices in India. The book is of major significance to CR practitioners, scholars, teachers, students and C-Suite professionals who will also find the techniques proposed in the book interesting as they can assess, evaluate, adopt and adapt strategies followed by other companies for reputation enhancement.
This is an updated and revised edition of the author's successful and ground breaking book on international public relations and global reputation. Michael Morley has counselled clients of the world's largest corporations. This book shows how to achieve a global reputation and why this makes a vital contribution to the survival and success of the corporation.
How well can you answer pet owners' questions about proper diet and feeding? Canine and Feline Nutrition, 3rd Edition describes the role of nutrition and its effects upon health and wellness and the dietary management of various disorders of dogs and cats. By using the book's cutting-edge research and clinical nutrition information, you'll be able to make recommendations of appropriate pet food and proper feeding guidelines. Pet nutrition experts Linda P. Case, MS, Leighann Daristotle, DVM, PhD, Michael G. Hayek, PhD, and Melody Foess Raasch, DVM, provide complete, head-to-tail coverage and a broad scope of knowledge, so you can help dog and cat owners make sound nutrition and feeding choices to promote their pets' health to prolong their lives. Tables and boxes provide quick reference to the most important clinical information. Key points summarize essential information at a glance. A useful Nutritional Myths and Feeding Practices chapter dispels and corrects common food myths. New clinical information covers a wide range of emerging nutrition topics including the role of the omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid families in pet health and disease management. Coverage of pet food safety and pet food ingredients includes both commercially and home-prepared foods and provides answers to pet owners’ questions on these topics. Completely updated content reflects the latest findings in clinical nutrition research. Information regarding functional ingredients and dietary supplementation provides a scientifically based rationale for recommending or advising against dietary supplements. Guidelines for understanding pet food formulations and health claims differentiate between "market-speak" and actual clinical benefits for patients, with practice advice for evaluating and selecting appropriate foods.
This paper evaluates empirically four types of cost that may result from an international sovereign default: reputational costs, international trade exclusion costs, costs to the domestic economy through the financial system, and political costs to the authorities. It finds that the economic costs are generally significant but short-lived, and sometimes do not operate through conventional channels. The political consequences of a debt crisis, by contrast, seem to be particularly dire for incumbent governments and finance ministers, broadly in line with what happens in currency crises.
Recent research in business strategy suggests that corporate reputations are a valuable strategic asset for every company. Good reputations have been shown to help firms attain and sustain superior financial performance in their industry. This book outlines how high-status companies become corporate super brands, and it present managers with a framework to proactively enhance their corporation's desired reputation. While many books concentrate on advertising or corporate identity as the primary tools for reputation enhancement, this book provides a more expansive and realistic picture of what it takes to build a corporate super brand. One of its key contributions is that it emphasizes the roles of customer value and organizational culture in the reputation-building process and exposes the limitations of corporate advertising, sponsorships, and minor corporate identity change. Drawing on more than fifteen years of academic research, executive seminars, and consulting experience, Grahame Dowling suggests ways to improve the corporate reputations that different groups of stakeholders hold of your company. He also describes how to avoid many of the traps that catch unwary managers who try to improve their company's desired reputation.
In the aftermath of scandals such as those at Enron and WorldCom, there is a growing suspicion of the corporate world. For this reason it is more important than ever for firms to maintain a good reputation. In Building Reputational Capital, Kevin T. Jackson offers a practical guide to taking the high road--the only path that leads to lasting success. Based on extensive research and real-world experience, Building Reputational Capital reveals basic principles of integrity and fairness with which firms can build an enduring reputation. More than image, a firm's reputation is a form of capital often neglected in the boardroom and overlooked in conventional analyses of financial statements. Speaking directly to the work experience of real people in practical business settings, Jackson couples each principle with straightforward actions that drive management systems, and he provides tested strategies--from downsizing techniques to e-commerce tips--that cultivate the hidden power of a good reputation. He outlines the advantages of a superior reputation (simply put, people want to work for, invest in, and do business with a company or person with integrity), describes the vital role the firm's leader must play, offers ways to build and protect your reputation on the Internet (from defusing Internet rumors to creating an online community), and shows how to rescue your reputation once disaster hits. Perhaps most important, he shows how to strike the right balance of virtues like authenticity, honesty, responsibility, and stewardship of the environment, employees, and the economy. Highlighted with real-life success stories--from giants like Hewlett-Packard to small firms like Thanksgiving Coffee Company (which invests part of its revenues in the Central American villages in which its beans are grown), Building Reputational Capital offers a simple but effective guide for executives, managers, entrepreneurs, legal professionals, and corporate consultants.
Reputation branding can help you create deeper, moremeaningful and more profitable relationship and grow yourbusiness without spending a cent. In this insightfulbook, Hannah Samuel reveals why reputation, trust andintegrity are essential to creating and maintaining asustainable competitive advantage, and how branding hasbecome the new ......
In Mission: Intangible. Managing risk and reputation to create enterprise value, the author shares value-creating strategies for conquering headline risks and helping corporate executives, C-suite leaders, and business directors protect their most critical business processes. Dr. Nir Kossovsky, chief executive of Steel City Re has spent the last 30 years helping companies increase, protect, and restore their intangible asset value. Dr Kossovsky offers convincing proof that protecting a company's intangible assets is an investment in reputation resilience and value creation. By reading this book, business leaders will obtain the knowledge and insights they need to: Identify how intangible assets contribute to enterprise value Build a business case for allocating resources to protect and grow intangible asset value Manage intangible assets to create a competitive edge and reputation resilience Mitigate risks that may reduce intangible asset value Develop superior strategies for communicating value to stakeholders Dr. Kossovskys insightful methods for managing ethical compliance, quality, safety, sustainability and security will help businesses compete successfully in a dynamic global economy. Click here to read what experts are saying about Mission: Intangible. Click here for ideas on how to use Mission: Intangible in a classroom setting.

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