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Since 1977 the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield has staged the snooker World Championship and in that time become one of the most beloved and iconic venues in sport. In this book the UK's leading snooker writer Hector Nunns makes his selection of the greatest matches ever played in the famous amphitheatre, featuring the heroes of the early years right through to the household names of the present day. With exclusive contributions from the players involved, and how they saw the build-up, the match itself, the agony of defeat and ecstasy of victory, and the experience of being involved in a memorable encounter on the sport's greatest stage, in what is always the biggest, best and final tournament of the season. The Crucible's Greatest Matches recalls how promoter Mike Watterson stumbled across the theatre with the help of his wife Carole and throws the spotlight on classic matches involving Ronnie O'Sullivan, Stephen Hendry, Jimmy White, the late and much-missed Alex Higgins and Paul Hunter, Cliff Thorburn, Terry Griffiths, Ken Doherty and of course the 1985 black-ball final between Dennis Taylor and Steve Davis.
From the earliest FA Cup finals in the 1870s played between teams of former public schoolboys, to twenty-first-century Champions League matches contested by teams of billionaires – with stops along the way for Leicester City’s extraordinary Premier League triumph, the Hand of God, and the 1966 World Cup – this is football history as it happened, straight from the pages of The Times. ‘The players came off arm in arm. They knew they had finally fashioned something of which to be proud.’
Considered by many to be a genius at his peak, Alex Higgins's unorthodox play and exciting style earned him the nickname 'Hurricane' and led to his immense popularity and fame. In 1972 he became the youngest winner of the World Championship, repeating his victory in emotional style in 1982. Higgins's story is so much more than just snooker. Head-butting tournament officials, threatening to shoot team-mates, getting involved with gangsters, abusing referees, affairs with glamorous women, frequent fines and lengthy bans, all contributed to Higgins slipping down the rankings as he succumbed to drink and lost his fortune. After suffering throat cancer, Alex Higgins now reflects on his turbulent life and career in his first full autobiography. The Hurricane is back - prepare to be caught up in the carnage.
The classic history of golf in America from the sport’s poet laureate Widely regarded as the definitive account of America’s love affair with the world’s greatest game, this magisterial volume is Herbert Warren Wind’s masterpiece. From John Reid, the expatriate Scotsman who imported a set of clubs and balls from St. Andrews in 1888 and built a three-hole course on a cow pasture in Yonkers, New York, to Alan Shepard’s six-iron shot on the surface of the moon, The Story of American Golf documents the iconic moments in the sport’s first century in the United States. Wind captures legendary players, including C. B. Macdonald, Bobby Jones, Byron Nelson, Babe Didrikson Zaharias, Ben Hogan, and Jack Nicklaus, in all their glory, and expertly analyzes the developments in style, equipment, and technique that created the modern game. Encyclopedic in scope and intimate in detail, The Story of American Golf is both a fitting tribute to the beautiful and fickle game that inspired a national obsession and a testament to Herbert Warren Wind’s incomparable talents as a journalist and historian.
The 1920s and 30s were key decades for the history of American social science. The success of such quantitative disciplines as economics and psychology during World War I forced social scientists to reexamine their methods and practices and to consider recasting their field as a more objective science separated from its historical foundation in social reform. The debate that ensued, fiercely conducted in books, articles, correspondence, and even presidential addresses, made its way into every aspect of social science thought of the period and is the subject of this book. Mark C. Smith first provides a historical overview of the controversy over the nature and future of the social sciences in early twentieth-century America and, then through a series of intellectual biographies, offers an intensive study of the work and lives of major figures who participated in this debate. Using an extensive range of materials, from published sources to manuscript collections, Smith examines "objectivists"—economist Wesley Mitchell and political scientist Charles Merriam—and the more "purposive thinkers"—historian Charles Beard, sociologist Robert Lynd, and political scientist and neo-Freudian Harold Lasswell. He shows how the debate over objectivity and social purpose was central to their professional and personal lives as well as to an understanding of American social science between the two world wars. These biographies bring to vivid life a contentious moment in American intellectual history and reveal its significance in the shaping of social science in this country.
A sports journalist pays tribute to great moments in New York sports history in an illustrated survey that ranks the top one hundred events that transformed American sports, from an 1823 horse race that pitted the North against the South, to Lou Gehrig's farewell speech, to the Ali-Frazier fight at the Garden, covering all of the city's storied franchises and more.

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