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A Nobel Prize–winning neuroscientist’s probing investigation of what brain disorders can tell us about human nature Eric R. Kandel, the winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his foundational research into memory storage in the brain, is one of the pioneers of modern brain science. His work continues to shape our understanding of how learning and memory work and to break down age-old barriers between the sciences and the arts. In his seminal new book, The Disordered Mind, Kandel draws on a lifetime of pathbreaking research and the work of many other leading neuroscientists to take us on an unusual tour of the brain. He confronts one of the most difficult questions we face: How does our mind, our individual sense of self, emerge from the physical matter of the brain? The brain’s 86 billion neurons communicate with one another through very precise connections. But sometimes those connections are disrupted. The brain processes that give rise to our mind can become disordered, resulting in diseases such as autism, depression, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s, addiction, and post-traumatic stress disorder. While these disruptions bring great suffering, they can also reveal the mysteries of how the brain produces our most fundamental experiences and capabilities—the very nature of what it means to be human. Studies of autism illuminate the neurological foundations of our social instincts; research into depression offers important insights on emotions and the integrity of the self; and paradigm-shifting work on addiction has led to a new understanding of the relationship between pleasure and willpower. By studying disruptions to typical brain functioning and exploring their potential treatments, we will deepen our understanding of thought, feeling, behavior, memory, and creativity. Only then can we grapple with the big question of how billions of neurons generate consciousness itself.
Schatzberg's Manual of Clinical Psychopharmacology is a meticulously researched, yet down-to-earth guide for practitioners prescribing psychotropic medications to individuals with psychiatric disorders or symptoms mandating treatment. The ninth edition offers up-to-date information on current drugs, interactions, side effects, and dosing guidelines, and retains the strengths and features that have made it a standard text for trainees and practicing clinicians. The authors also include a new chapter on important developments in laboratory-guided pharmacotherapy, including pharmacogenomic testing, neurocognitive testing, quantitative EEG, and neuroimaging. Although the book's primary purpose is to provide the reader-practitioner with basic and practical information regarding the many classes of psychiatric medications, the authors stress that understanding how to select and prescribe psychotropic medications does not obviate the basic need to comprehensively evaluate and understand psychiatric patients. Accordingly, the book draws on the authors' clinical experience, as well as on the scientific literature, resulting in an accessible, yet rigorous text. Features that have helped cement this book's reputation include: Coverage is not limited to long-standing and newly approved medications, but also includes agents that are likely to receive approval from the FDA in the near future, ensuring that the reader stays up-to-date. References are provided for key statements, and each chapter is then followed by a list of selected relevant articles and books for readers who want to go beyond the material presented, making for a leaner, more reader-friendly guide. Dozens of summary tables with key information on classes of psychotropics function as quick-reference guides, promoting learning and serving as convenient resources for overloaded clinicians. The appendix offers two kinds of suggested readings. The first, for clinicians, is invaluable to trainees, while the second, for patients and families, helps point clinicians to books aimed at a lay audience to supplement information provided to patients. Staying abreast of both new medications and promising treatment protocols is essential in this rapidly evolving field. Schatzberg's Manual of Clinical Psychopharmacology delivers authoritative information in a friendly, collegial style, ensuring that both students and practicing clinicians are equipped to provide a superior standard of care.
Autism 360 uses a hybrid and transdisciplinary methodology to identify mechanisms on how autism is prevented, diagnosed, treated and managed within personal and social constructs around the world. Adopting a lifespan approach, the book discusses lifestyle challenges and emphasizes issues relating to neurodiversity, individuality, best practices, and support of both people on the spectrum and their families. This book will help change population and individual attitudes and behaviors regarding autism. Its ultimate goal is to empower readers to become both agents of change and an integral part of the solution. Covers topics from the prevention and treatment of autism and how to live with it Adopts an integrated methods approach Features field experiences Provides valuable syntheses of scattered material Compares cross-cultural learnings Discusses the education and employment of those with autism
The Disordered Mind: An Introduction to Philosophy of Mind and Mental Illness, second edition examines and explains, from a philosophical standpoint, what mental disorder is: its reality, causes, consequences, and more. It is also an outstanding introduction to philosophy of mind from the perspective of mental disorder. Revised and updated throughout, this second edition includes new discussions of grief and psychopathy, the problems of the psychophysical basis of disorder, the nature of selfhood, and clarification of the relation between rationality and mental disorder. Each chapter explores a central question or problem about mental disorder, including: what is mental disorder and can it be distinguished from neurological disorder? what roles should reference to psychological, cultural, and social factors play in the medical/scientific understanding of mental disorder? what makes mental disorders undesirable? Are they diseases? mental disorder and the mind–body problem is mental disorder a breakdown of rationality? What is a rational mind? addiction, responsibility and compulsion ethical dilemmas posed by mental disorder, including questions of dignity and self-respect. Each topic is clearly explained and placed in a clinical and philosophical context. Mental disorders discussed include clinical depression, dissociative identity disorder, anxiety, religious delusions, and paranoia. Several non-mental neurological disorders that possess psychological symptoms are also examined, including Alzheimer’s disease, Down’s syndrome, and Tourette’s syndrome. Containing chapter summaries and suggestions for further reading at the end of each chapter, The Disordered Mind, second edition is a superb introduction to the philosophy of mental disorder for students of philosophy, psychology, psychiatry, and related mental health professions.
A thirty year old murder case and a possible wrongful conviction, Disordered Minds is the mystery thriller from crime queen Minette Walters. In 1970, Harold Stamp, a retarded twenty-year-old was convicted on disputed evidence and a retracted confession of brutally murdering his grandmother – the one person who understood and protected him. Less than three years later he is dead, driven to suicide by isolation and despair. A fate befitting a murderer, perhaps, but what if he were innocent? Thirty years on, Jonathan Hughes, an anthropologist specializing in social stereotyping, comes across the case by accident. He finds alarming disparities in the evidence and has little doubt that Stamp's conviction was a terrible miscarriage of justice. But how far is Hughes prepared to go in the search for justice? Is the forgotten story of one friendless young man compelling enough to make him leave his books and face his own demons? And with what result? If Stamp didn't murder Grace Jeffries then somebody else did . . . and sleeping dogs are best left alone . . .

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